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[Build Ready] Need to verify this CUSTOM GAMING PC is ready

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October 13, 2012 4:37:03 PM

I have been working hard on this $1,200 gaming pc: http://pcpartpicker.com/parts/partlist/

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.88 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($387.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 600T ATX Mid Tower Case ($133.56 @ Mac Connection)
Power Supply: CoolMax 700W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($51.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($15.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Monitor: Asus VH236H 23.0" Monitor ($139.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1300.22
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I would like this build to be as future proof as possible (adding monitors, adding a second graphics card, etc.). My main concern is being able to play games such as Starcraft 2, Civ 5, Total war games, Battlefield 3, etc. I will also be doing basic office work but not high-end photo/video editing etc.

-I am now most worried about my PSU and my Case. I originally planned on spending less than $100 on case, but I came to the realization I am putting a lot of time and money into this I mine as well had a badass case. However, the case in my list isn't the exact case I want. This is the case http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

-I am reasonable, so if I am wasting money anywhere, please tell me. I am most worried about performance and future-proofing. So, if my case is overkill please tell me. I was thinking of the Corsair 400r.

-The PSU I chose has little info on it and I don't know if it is a crappy brand. I also think I need at least 750W if I want a second GPU but I am not sure. This PSU was so cheap it was hard to pass up.

-The monitor seems good. Let me know if it is.

THANKS FOR YOUR HELP!!!!!
October 13, 2012 5:20:27 PM

Change the PSU for a proper branded quality unit from Seasonic, Antec, Corsair, PC power and cooling, OCZ, XFX. Your chosen unit is junk this reviewer found that out http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

The extreme 4 motherboard was found to use some cheap mofsets can lead to VRM overheating if you like to overclock. If that bothers you get something from ASUS or Gbyte I recommened Gigabytes ga-z77x-ud3h.

Best solution

October 13, 2012 5:38:59 PM
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Your Parts list is pretty good, and pretty much what a lot of people would pick for a gaming PC in that category.
If you were trying to save money, the places you most likely would see some saving by waiting would be:
SSD (not that *specific* model, but a decent one - look to spend about $60-70 for a decent one - Vertex 4, Agility 4, some others similar models go on sale regularly - check slickdeals.net)
Power Supply: I agree no reason to choose that one specifically - either buy a quality name as the other poster said, or buy an OCZ or similar 80+ when they go on sale - should be able to get what you need for probably $10 less (550 Watts +)
Case: Very personal choice. You can get one that would work and give decent acoustics for <$50 (ie something like: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...). On the other hand they just keep getting better the more expensive you go. I personally have a Corsair 500R, a Source 210 Elite and 2 Antec 300s - the Corsair 500R is by far the easiest case to work with, but the ultimate build thermals are pretty similar (*with all fans filled up with decent fans - you have to pretty much ignore case reviews on thermals because cheaper cases = fewer fans by default = worse thermals).

Your monitor is fine, the cheapest real "upgrade" from a decent 1080P would be a 27" 2560x1660 IPS from Korea on Ebay. $300, chance of issues, but beautiful.
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October 13, 2012 5:42:55 PM

Nice build. I agree change the PSU.
October 13, 2012 5:48:24 PM

You can save yourself some trouble in installing the CPU cooler if you get low profile RAM as well such as the G.Skill Ares and Corsair Vengeance LP.
October 13, 2012 5:49:43 PM

jacobsta811 said:
Your Parts list is pretty good, and pretty much what a lot of people would pick for a gaming PC in that category.
If you were trying to save money, the places you most likely would see some saving by waiting would be:
SSD (not that *specific* model, but a decent one - look to spend about $60-70 for a decent one - Vertex 4, Agility 4, some others similar models go on sale regularly - check slickdeals.net)
Power Supply: I agree no reason to choose that one specifically - either buy a quality name as the other poster said, or buy an OCZ or similar 80+ when they go on sale - should be able to get what you need for probably $10 less (550 Watts +)
Case: Very personal choice. You can get one that would work and give decent acoustics for <$50 (ie something like: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...). On the other hand they just keep getting better the more expensive you go. I personally have a Corsair 500R, a Source 210 Elite and 2 Antec 300s - the Corsair 500R is by far the easiest case to work with, but the ultimate build thermals are pretty similar (*with all fans filled up with decent fans - you have to pretty much ignore case reviews on thermals because cheaper cases = fewer fans by default = worse thermals).

Your monitor is fine, the cheapest real "upgrade" from a decent 1080P would be a 27" 2560x1660 IPS from Korea on Ebay. $300, chance of issues, but beautiful.


Thanks for the insight. I probably will stick with the monitor for now since it seems like a very good price. Do you think I am spending too much on the case? I am just worried if I get a $50 case I will regret it, but I truly don't know how much of a difference there will be.
October 13, 2012 5:56:04 PM

excella1221 said:
You can save yourself some trouble in installing the CPU cooler if you get low profile RAM as well such as the G.Skill Ares and Corsair Vengeance LP.


I'm sorry, I don't really understand what you mean. How will chaning my RAM affect installing my CPU cooler?
October 13, 2012 5:58:30 PM

The low profiles ones get rid of the tall unnecessary heat spreaders, so it won't conflict with the CPU cooler's bottom.
October 13, 2012 6:00:03 PM

Well, lets see the real differences tend to be:
More expensive cases are bigger
They have more spots to mount fans, and the ability to mount water cooler radiators internally
They have more "features" like removable drive cages, toolless mounting for hard drives & CD drives, mounting for 2.5" SSD
Often more front external ports like USB ports, ESATA, etc
Better cable routing

With your built, the real difference I would see between a more expensive case and say, the Source 210 Elite:
Your graphics card might stick into the drive cages, so you wouldn't be able to mount a hard drive in two of them. (Still room for probably 4 or 5 hard drives)
No mounting for a 2.5" SSD, so you'd have to have a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter plate. Some SSD come with them or you can probably spend $5 on one somewhere.
Need to buy 4 120mm fans to fill out the case (although usually you need at least 2 or 3 to fill out a more expensive case, as well)
Need to screw more things in.
Only one USB 3.0 port and one USB 2.0 port on front (vs often 2 of each on expensive cases).
Less room, but enough to fit everything you have listed no problem.
October 13, 2012 6:42:55 PM

jacobsta811 said:
Well, lets see the real differences tend to be:
More expensive cases are bigger
They have more spots to mount fans, and the ability to mount water cooler radiators internally
They have more "features" like removable drive cages, toolless mounting for hard drives & CD drives, mounting for 2.5" SSD
Often more front external ports like USB ports, ESATA, etc
Better cable routing

With your built, the real difference I would see between a more expensive case and say, the Source 210 Elite:
Your graphics card might stick into the drive cages, so you wouldn't be able to mount a hard drive in two of them. (Still room for probably 4 or 5 hard drives)
No mounting for a 2.5" SSD, so you'd have to have a 2.5" to 3.5" adapter plate. Some SSD come with them or you can probably spend $5 on one somewhere.
Need to buy 4 120mm fans to fill out the case (although usually you need at least 2 or 3 to fill out a more expensive case, as well)
Need to screw more things in.
Only one USB 3.0 port and one USB 2.0 port on front (vs often 2 of each on expensive cases).
Less room, but enough to fit everything you have listed no problem.


So, you think it would be wise to downgrade?
October 13, 2012 6:53:19 PM

Best answer selected by beegeepee.
October 13, 2012 7:06:30 PM

Depends how much $75 means to you. You won't notice the difference in day to day usage once the system is built, almost certainly. It isn't really a question of "wise" or not - if your goal is performance per $ a cheaper case is better, if your goal is maximum upgradeability/expandability or ease of building the computer in the first place, a more expensive case is better.
!