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Really in need of help finalising my build choices.

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October 14, 2012 11:17:43 AM

This is going to be my very first build. I started researching it after knowing more or less nothing about a week ago and this site seems to be by far the best website on the internet for anything computer related. All the parts I picked are all subject to change if anyone can lend some advice, as I sort of looked each thing up separately by looking at reviews and what other people are choosing without actually knowing if they all work well together. Also I don’t know if I have completely overdone it too or picked unnecessarily good parts which I will not have use for and could make it much cheaper. For example the motherboard and graphics card I am unsure of. So please feel free to change parts and state the reason, as the only thing I really settled on was the CPU. Also I want this to be lasting me a good three years or so without having to do much upgrading. So if it could be cheaper with the same spec that would be great, but I don’t want to skimp out and get inferior parts!

Approximate Purchase Date: Within the next month

Budget Range: Preferably below £700 ($1125 I think) as I think what I have chosen is unnecessarily expensive for what it is, but would stretch to £750.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming (preferably turning all settings up as high as possible), films, internet, the odd bit of CAD

Are you buying a monitor: Yes at some point but not including it in this.

Do you need to buy OS: Possibly. I bought windows 7 for my laptop and was hoping I can transfer the license to my new one, but if not I will need to buy one.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Preferably a UK website but not vital. Mainly been looking on ebuyer though as it has most of the parts.

Location: Birmingham, England

Parts Preferences: No preference

Overclocking: Maybe in the future, currently don’t know how so would have to read up about it.

Your Monitor Resolution: Will be looking for a 1920x1080 I think.

Additional Comments: Being able to run AutoCAD would be nice as I use it for my job, but my current laptop runs it so this will not have a problem running it. Games-wise basically will be looking to play the newest games on very high settings.

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: Haven’t had a decent enough PC to play games since the first counter strike, so would like to get back into pc gaming again as I always felt it was far superior to console gaming!

CPU: Intel Core i5 3570K 3.4GHz Socket 1155 6MB Cache (currently £177.45, I missed out on a £149 amazon deal the other day unfortunately)
http://www.ebuyer.com/349029-intel-core-i5-3570k-3-4ghz...

Motherboard: Asrock Z77 Pro4 Socket 1155 VGA DVI HDMI 7.1 Channel Audio ATX (£87.81)
http://www.ebuyer.com/398389-asrock-z77-pro4-socket-115...

Graphics: Sapphire HD 7870 GHZ OC Edition 2GB GDDR5 HDMI DVI Dual Mini DisplayPort PCI-E Graphics Card (£231.04)
http://www.ebuyer.com/349750-sapphire-hd-7870-ghz-oc-ed...

RAM: G.Skill 8GB (2x4) DDR3 1600Mhz RipjawsX Memory (£30.10)
http://www.ebuyer.com/264750-g-skill-8gb-ddr3-1600mhz-r...

CPU cooler: Coolermaster Hyper 212 Evo (£30.26) No idea about this one to be honest, do I need it/is this one ok?
http://www.ebuyer.com/297389-coolermaster-hyper-212-evo...

PSU: Corsair CX 750W PSU - 80plus Bronze Certified (£68.98)
http://www.ebuyer.com/393120-corsair-cx-series-cx750-at...

Case: Sharkoon T9 Case - White Edition (£46.66) Is this the correct size case?
http://www.ebuyer.com/262922-sharkoon-t9-case-white-edi...

Optical: Samsung SH-222BB SATA DVD Write Optical Drive | OEM (£12.99) This was literally just a case of picking anything. This will work?
http://www.ebuyer.com/342873-samsung-sh-222bb-sata-dvd-...

Hard Drive: Seagate 1TB Barracuda Internal Hard Drive (£59.93)
http://www.ebuyer.com/319639-seagate-1tb-barracuda-inte...

I wasn’t going to bother with an SSD, maybe in the future.

Total: £745.22

Ok so the bottom line is:-
-Will this all fit and work together well?
-Is there any way to make this cheaper without sacrificing performance?
-For the money is this actually a good build or could it be so much better?

I would really appreciate some feedback as I find this whole process completely confusing and is giving me a headache! Thanks, Rob.

More about : finalising build choices

October 14, 2012 11:38:25 AM

If your not going to SLI I would drop the PSU down to a 600

MoBo and Case are good both have USB3.0 on them

Well rounded build you got
October 14, 2012 11:45:44 AM

Yes, all of them would fit together well.
Yes, refer to below.
It's a good build but you're over paying stuff. Refer to below.

Here's a list of your build with tags on stores that sell it the cheapest.
ebuyer doesn't really have that great retail pricing.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.94 @ Scan.co.uk)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler (£26.65 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£104.12 @ Scan.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card (£196.99 @ Novatech)
Power Supply: OCZ ZT 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply (£69.18 @ Scan.co.uk)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon T9 Case - White Edition (£46.66)
Total: £708.50
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I couldn't find the Sharkoon anywhere, so I just put that in manually. Feel free to buy it on ebuyer. And yes, everything would fit there. :) 

I'm assuming you picked 750w since you're planning on adding another 7870 in the future. The card isn't that power hungry, so a 650w would be more than enough for a 2-way 7870 Crossfire.

The above is also the reason why I changed the motherboard.

I picked the Gigabyte mainly cause they have the least complaints IMO, and Windforce X3 is a great cooler.

I put in low profile RAM so you'll have an easier time installing the CPU cooler. The large heat spreaders of the Ripjaws might conflict with the cooler's bottom. I would usually suggest a G.Skill ares, but it's a bit more expensive.

P.S-
- If you're not gonna add a 2nd GPU in the future, drop the 650w, and get a 500-550w PSU.
- In addition to the above, drop the Extreme4, and put pack the Pro4.
Related resources
October 14, 2012 11:45:50 AM

Nothing there I would hugely disagree with. Just a couple of points.
Are you thinking of adding 2nd graphics card, in crossfire? If so, would prefer slightly more expensive Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H mobo, as has better crossfire support. If not, as Emelth points out, PSU could be dropped to 600w, or even 550w.
Whilst it is more expensive, would prefer WD Caviar Black, for HDD. Better reliability, or at least, better warranty.
October 14, 2012 1:28:46 PM

excella1221 said:
Yes, all of them would fit together well.
Yes, refer to below.
It's a good build but you're over paying stuff. Refer to below.

Here's a list of your build with tags on stores that sell it the cheapest.
ebuyer doesn't really have that great retail pricing.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.94 @ Scan.co.uk)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler (£26.65 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£104.12 @ Scan.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card (£196.99 @ Novatech)
Power Supply: OCZ ZT 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V Power Supply (£69.18 @ Scan.co.uk)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon T9 Case - White Edition (£46.66)
Total: £708.50
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I couldn't find the Sharkoon anywhere, so I just put that in manually. Feel free to buy it on ebuyer. And yes, everything would fit there. :) 

I'm assuming you picked 750w since you're planning on adding another 7870 in the future. The card isn't that power hungry, so a 650w would be more than enough for a 2-way 7870 Crossfire.

The above is also the reason why I changed the motherboard.

I picked the Gigabyte mainly cause they have the least complaints IMO, and Windforce X3 is a great cooler.

I put in low profile RAM so you'll have an easier time installing the CPU cooler. The large heat spreaders of the Ripjaws might conflict with the cooler's bottom. I would usually suggest a G.Skill ares, but it's a bit more expensive.

P.S-
- If you're not gonna add a 2nd GPU in the future, drop the 650w, and get a 500-550w PSU.
- In addition to the above, drop the Extreme4, and put pack the Pro4.




Thank you all, excellent advice. Just a few of things though-
-What is the purpose of adding a second 7870? To be fair it only adds an extra £25-ish onto the total so I guess it can't hurt to prepare just incase in future i decide to do it? Since I am quite new to this I'm unsure what this does.

-Secondly the Hitachi storage you suggest has bad reviews compared to the Seagate. Would it be worth paying the extra £8 for the Seagate?

- Is there anything else that I have missed out? I have read a few people also getting surge protectors with their computers, should I be doing the same? I am not going to bother with a separate sound card, and apart from the monitor, mouse, keyboard etc is there anything else I should be looking at or is this all the parts I need?

Thanks in advance :wahoo: 

October 14, 2012 1:38:23 PM

"Crossfire" is the term used when using 2-4 GPUs of the same type in one computer. Basically, you stack the cards to achieve even greater performance.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_CrossFireX

Where exactly are you reading these reviews? If they are consumer reviews, it's hardly reliable since most of them are just mad @ DOA units.
I would personally pick the Hitachi over a Seagate any day, since Seagate has had a history of their HDD failing in a wide margin, and they never admitted to this, they just decided to update the firmware. On that note though, I would take a Western Digital over both of them. The Caviar Black, specifically, has a 5-year warranty compared to Seagate's 3.

I don't believe you have missed anything out, other than OS. Did you buy an OEM or a retail version?
October 14, 2012 1:57:29 PM

excella1221 said:
"Crossfire" is the term used when using 2-4 GPUs of the same type in one computer. Basically, you stack the cards to achieve even greater performance.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AMD_CrossFireX

Where exactly are you reading these reviews? If they are consumer reviews, it's hardly reliable since most of them are just mad @ DOA units.
I would personally pick the Hitachi over a Seagate any day, since Seagate has had a history of their HDD failing in a wide margin, and they never admitted to this, they just decided to update the firmware. On that note though, I would take a Western Digital over both of them. The Caviar Black, specifically, has a 5-year warranty compared to Seagate's 3.

I don't believe you have missed anything out, other than OS. Did you buy an OEM or a retail version?



Oh, just searching online reviews by consumers really. Ok i'll reconsider the hitachi then. To be fair all the hard drives you look at people have given them bad reviews because people are more likely to write a review when they have a complaint. The OS I have was a download version of windows 7 I bought through microsoft online a few years ago. I have read mixed experiences of people not being able to transfer their license whereas some people have, so I was just going to leave it for now and if need be ill purchase another one at a later date.

Ok so worked out if I want future crossfire capability then it will cost me an extra £16, which is minimal in the long run I say so it makes sense to do that.

So i'll probably be ordering parts some time in the week, thanks a lot for your help. Any recommendations of any good tutorials for helping me to build it? I'm sure there are thousands out there so I'll be fine i reckon haha.
October 14, 2012 5:52:19 PM

If you're not sure about OCing you might want to consider dropping down to a locked i5 and put the savings toward a better video card:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor (£140.50 @ Ebuyer)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£62.99 @ Overclockers.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£49.98 @ Ebuyer)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (£316.55 @ Scan.co.uk)
Case: Antec Three Hundred Two ATX Mid Tower Case (£50.13 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer (£13.98 @ Novatech)
Total: £716.10
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

This will give you much better gaming performance than your build and only slightly less CAD performance. If you want to save some money you could drop the GPU down to a Radeon 7950 and save about £100.
October 14, 2012 7:33:28 PM

lighter17 said:
If you're not sure about OCing you might want to consider dropping down to a locked i5 and put the savings toward a better video card:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor (£140.50 @ Ebuyer)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£62.99 @ Overclockers.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£49.98 @ Ebuyer)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card (£316.55 @ Scan.co.uk)
Case: Antec Three Hundred Two ATX Mid Tower Case (£50.13 @ Amazon UK)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer (£13.98 @ Novatech)
Total: £716.10
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

This will give you much better gaming performance than your build and only slightly less CAD performance. If you want to save some money you could drop the GPU down to a Radeon 7950 and save about £100.


Was pretty sure I had got everything sorted until I saw this, now i'm torn whether I should get this cheaper cpu and better gpu! I'm not necessarily not going to OC, probably in the future when I've got everything up and running and I know what I am doing I will look into it. So would doing this limit the potential further down the road? Going with the previous build of the HD 7870 and the i5-3570k what sort of performance could I be expecting, and how long would it last me before I even needed to consider upgrading or buying an additional gpu to crossfire?
October 14, 2012 8:29:39 PM

Without OCing the 3570k is about 10% faster than the 3470. I doubt you'd be able to notice that difference in any applications, and certainly not in games. OCed to 4.2 GHz the 3570k is about 30% faster in multi-threaded apps (i.e. CAD) and about 20% faster in single threaded apps (i.e most games) than the 3470. I would think that the difference would be noticeable for CAD, but I doubt it would be noticeable in games (well much less of a difference than a 7970 vs 7870 ).

Trying to predict when upgrades would be necessary is a bit difficult since we don't know what new games will require and tolerance for playing with lower settings/slower frame rates varies. I would guess that a 7970 would allow you to go at least a year longer before upgrades than the 7870.

October 14, 2012 9:53:57 PM

lighter17 said:
Without OCing the 3570k is about 10% faster than the 3470. I doubt you'd be able to notice that difference in any applications, and certainly not in games. OCed to 4.2 GHz the 3570k is about 30% faster in multi-threaded apps (i.e. CAD) and about 20% faster in single threaded apps (i.e most games) than the 3470. I would think that the difference would be noticeable for CAD, but I doubt it would be noticeable in games (well much less of a difference than a 7970 vs 7870 ).

Trying to predict when upgrades would be necessary is a bit difficult since we don't know what new games will require and tolerance for playing with lower settings/slower frame rates varies. I would guess that a 7970 would allow you to go at least a year longer before upgrades than the 7870.


Hmm ok. CAD is definitely on low priority as I like to keep work at work and not bring it home! I think the 7970 is a bit expensive for me, the 7950 though looks alright. How about this build?

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/kkrr
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/kkrr/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/kkrr/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor (£140.50 @ Ebuyer)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler (£26.65 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£84.92 @ Scan.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£55.46 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£254.99 @ Novatech)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply (£53.49 @ Ebuyer)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £706.64
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I have swapped out the 3570k for the 3450 saving £27, and the Extreme4 for the Pro4 saving £19. The PSU I chose the 600w because it's only an extra £3 than the 550w. As for the Video Card I have swapped out the Radeon 7870 for the 7950 3gb card.

So how does this compare? I'm getting a bit lost in it all now! Firstly is this all compatible, and will this provide me with a pretty killer computer for a good few years?

Thanks for the help I really appreciate it.
October 14, 2012 10:27:18 PM

One thing that may sound silly, but is actually worth considering, as it costs you nothing.
Drop the aftermarket cooler, but get an i5-3570K. Same price, and higher performance (you could just drop the cooler with the 3450, of course). There's nothing to say you have to overclock an unlocked processor. What that does give you, however, is overclocking, in reserve. When you find, as you inevitably will, sooner or later, that your processor is "falling behind" the latest offerings, all you have to do is stick on an aftermarket cooler, then, and give yourself a 20% boost, for £27.
October 14, 2012 10:34:57 PM

TBH even though I included the 7970 in my build the 7950 provides more bang for the buck (which is why I mentioned it as a cheaper option). The 7950 will allow you to play any current game on max settings unless you go with multiple monitors. Expecting to get a few years out of a gaming system without upgrades is a bit optimistic (unless you can live with lower settings/slower framerates).

Some issues with your build:

1. You won't need a CPU cooler with a locked CPU since you won't be overclocking. The cooler included with the CPU will be fine.

2. Similarly you don't need a Z77 motherboard if you won't be overclocking. The Asrock H77M I included in my build is £22 cheaper than the Pro4. It is somewhat limited in terms of its expansion slots however. Is there a reason you went with the Z77 Pro4?

3. Why did you go with the Gigabyte 7950 instead of the XFX 7950 I linked earlier (which is about £40 cheaper)?

4. The XFX 550W PSU is better built than the Corsair CX, it has higher efficiency and the actual power output difference only amounts to 2A on the 12V rail (about 25W). If they were the same price I would recommend the XFX, and since it's a little cheaper there's no reason to consider the Corsair.

So this is what the build would look like if you make these changes:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor (£140.50 @ Ebuyer)
Motherboard: ASRock H77M Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£62.99 @ Overclockers.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£55.46 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£214.19 @ CCL Computers)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £613.75
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
October 15, 2012 1:30:14 AM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3450 3.1GHz Quad-Core Processor (£140.50 @ Ebuyer)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£72.02 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£254.99 @ Novatech)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £661.11
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

You don't need the CPU cooler anymore since you're not overclocking.

Get this motherboard instead. You don't need a microATX motherboard, you're already cheaping out on everything else. A full will have more space between parts, room for upgrades, and more expansion slots. This is only a ~£10 difference.

I put in the Hitachi again since it's cheaper, and I still find it more reliable than Seagate.

The Gigabyte 7950 is a good investment. It has a 100MHz higher stock clock than the XFX above so there's a good stock headstart for higher OC and better cooling.
Windforce x3 is one of the best coolers around, and the 7950 is a great overclocker, you can reach 670 and 7970 stocks with ease. It would be a waste not to OC it.

I agree the XFX PSU would be a better buy.
October 15, 2012 3:53:34 AM

excella1221 said:
The Gigabyte 7950 is a good investment. It has a 100MHz higher stock clock than the XFX above so there's a good stock headstart for higher OC and better cooling.
Windforce x3 is one of the best coolers around, and the 7950 is a great overclocker, you can reach 670 and 7970 stocks with ease. It would be a waste not to OC it.


If there was only a £10 difference I could understand going with Gigabyte, but £40? I'm not seeing it.

The thing is that the two advantages that you mention aren't both going to be seen. If he doesn't go with a user overclock then the factory overclock gives about 10% more performance, but the better cooling is wasted. If he does overclock then the factory overclock is wasted (from everything I've seen factory overclock models don't achieve higher user overclocks than stock speed cards).
October 15, 2012 4:07:01 AM

"not going to be seen" is a bit of an exaggeration, people go through great lengths to OC GPUs as much as they can since it directly affects FPS.

From what I know, factory overclocked GPUs have a better design in terms of temps, and makes the factory-OC'd speed somewhat a stock. Gigabyte is also famous for being favorable to enthusiast overclockers and their units are designed especially for this.

Though I agree £40 is alot, he's already went way below his original budget, and the Gigabyte is a good investment for futureproofing when the GPU starts showing weakness and the OC option comes into play.
October 15, 2012 9:15:40 AM

excella1221 said:
"not going to be seen" is a bit of an exaggeration, people go through great lengths to OC GPUs as much as they can since it directly affects FPS.

From what I know, factory overclocked GPUs have a better design in terms of temps, and makes the factory-OC'd speed somewhat a stock. Gigabyte is also famous for being favorable to enthusiast overclockers and their units are designed especially for this.

Though I agree £40 is alot, he's already went way below his original budget, and the Gigabyte is a good investment for futureproofing when the GPU starts showing weakness and the OC option comes into play.


Going with the build you suggested which comes to £661, would it be worth it to swap out the i5-3450 with the i5-3570k? This will bring the total to £688 which is still below my budget, or would this just be a pointless buy? Going with the ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard you suggest would that still support some sort of OC'ing a few years down the line if need be? If it does then I don't mind spending the extra £20 or so going for the 3570k if it's actually going to be worth it.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knKD
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knKD/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knKD/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.94 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£71.96 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£254.99 @ Novatech)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £688.49
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
October 15, 2012 9:31:09 AM

Just thought aswell, the windows 7 I currently have on my laptop is not the 64 bit version, so I presume I will have to buy an operating system too now so i've added that on.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knNa
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knNa/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knNa/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.94 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£71.96 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£254.99 @ Novatech)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) (£71.64 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £760.13
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
October 15, 2012 9:43:10 AM

As I mentioned, before, it does make some sense, even if you don't want to OC processor, NOW, to have an unlocked "K" processor, so you can just add an aftermarket cooler, and overclock, in the future, to give your system a "new lease of life". That only works, however, if you use a Z77 mobo. Linking an i5-3570K, with a H77 mobo, doesn't allow you to do that. If you are going with H77 mobo, there's no advantage to a "K", and you might as well stick with, say, i5-3450, or 3550.
October 15, 2012 10:26:50 AM

excella1221 said:
No. The H77 cannot overclock.
If you are now considering overclocking but you don't need SLI/CF support, get this.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

EDIT: With the OS, we are now back to being overbudget. :lol: 

You might want to consider the £40 cheaper XFX now. :p 


Oook, right. If I go for the cheaper XFX and a Z77 mb it evens out a bit in the price.

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knP0
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knP0/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/knP0/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.94 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£84.92 @ Scan.co.uk)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£214.19 @ CCL Computers)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) (£71.64 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £732.29
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

So i'm getting the PC with operating system for under £750 which is good. With this motherboard, cpu and graphics card there will be some room in the future for pushing the computer a bit more I am hoping if need be? Plus this motherboard supports crossfire I think. How does this look?
October 15, 2012 10:37:05 AM

Yes, it's overclock ready and PSU is more than enough to support that.
Before you OC though, do not forget to buy a CPU cooler. The stock cooler that comes with the CPU sucks.

No, that z77 can't SLI/Crossfire. You need to make up your mind, hun. :lol: 

You can get this instead
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B007P709YI/?tag=pcp0f-21

It's overclockable and cheaper. Not much difference with the z77 Pro4.
October 15, 2012 11:11:49 AM

I think it's getting a bit "confused" over SLi and crossfire.
The ASRock "Pro" boards do not support SLi, but that's not an issue, if using a Radeon card.
The "Pro" boards DO support crossfire, but not with second lane running at x8, only x4.
In order to get OPTIMUM support for crossfire (and for that matter, SLi) you need to go to one of the "Extreme" boards.
HOWEVER, as crossfire is only a vague "perhaps", for the future, it really isn't worth spending a lot more, for optimum support. You'd just as well go for something like the Pro 3, or 4. If you want to add a 2nd card, it will WORK.
October 15, 2012 11:22:12 AM

Yes, +1 to malfbluff.
Technically speaking- with the presence of a PCI-E 2.0 slot, SLI/Crossfire IS a possibility, but there would be little point to it since it's a x4, and it will just bottleneck the 2nd card.

Hell, even Newegg seems to have decided not to mention in the motherboard's features that it can support SLI/Crossfire. :lol: 
October 15, 2012 11:41:04 AM

excella1221 said:
Yes, it's overclock ready and PSU is more than enough to support that.
Before you OC though, do not forget to buy a CPU cooler. The stock cooler that comes with the CPU sucks.

No, that z77 can't SLI/Crossfire. You need to make up your mind, hun. :lol: 

You can get this instead
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B007P709YI/?tag=pcp0f-21

It's overclockable and cheaper. Not much difference with the z77 Pro4.


Ok I understand now i think! So forget about crossfire, i'll just stick with one which will allow OC'ing. Which MB should i choose for this purpose then, the Z77 Pro4, extreme3, or the Z75 pro3 which you mentioned earlier?

Sorry you're probably getting bored of this going round in circles, but it's helping me out quite a bit :) 
October 15, 2012 11:44:52 AM

The z75 Pro3 would be most efficient for your needs. ^^
October 15, 2012 12:01:53 PM

Yes, no real point in spending more, now, on a mobo. By the time a HD7950 begins to "show its age", ie unable to keep up with new games, there will probably be a much better option, than crossfire, to update.
October 15, 2012 1:13:49 PM

Amazing, thanks for all the help :D  . Settled on...

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/ko9i
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/ko9i/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/uk/p/ko9i/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor (£167.94 @ Scan.co.uk)
Motherboard: ASRock Z75 Pro3 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard (£75.62 @ Amazon UK)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory (£31.99 @ Scan.co.uk)
Storage: Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£52.99 @ CCL Computers)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card (£214.19 @ CCL Computers)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply (£49.98 @ Novatech)
Optical Drive: Sony DDU1681S-0B DVD/CD Drive (£11.98 @ Scan.co.uk)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) (£71.64 @ Scan.co.uk)
Other: Sharkoon White Case (£46.66)
Total: £722.99
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

October 15, 2012 2:22:28 PM

Looks pretty good now. One very minor point. I have heard that there can be reliability issues, with some Sony optical drives. To be honest, I have no personal experience, with them, or even WHICH drives. As a result, I tend to recommend LG, or Lite-On, for optical drives, which seem to be generally reliable.
October 23, 2012 8:52:36 PM

Ok one last problem, I don't think I have all the cables needed. Got to the stage of connecting the hard drive and optical drive up, and I have the power connection from the power supply, but don't have anything to connect to the data slot of both.

On the Sony DDU1681S-0B 18x DVD-Rom the slot says Sata data, so I am guessing I need to get a sata cable from that to my motherboard. Will any old sata cable do-as you can pick them up really cheap on amazon.

And on the Hitachi Deskstar 7K1000.D hard drive I have the power supply cable fitted, but there are two spare slots which im guessing is for the data cable. There is a slot right up against the power supply cable slot which looks the same as the one on the optical drive which im guessing is what I need- a sata cable again. Or next to that slot is one with two pins which I have no idea what that is for.

Would have thought the motherboard would have come with sata cables, which is a shame because I would have had it all sorted tonight otherwise.
!