Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

New build, need help with components.

Last response: in Systems
Share
October 14, 2012 2:29:05 PM

Hi,

I'm building a PC for gaming and making video's, I want to to be able to capture gameplay from my PC and possibly xbox 360.

I'm in the UK and I don't want to spend much over £1000. I've decided on a few parts already, but if you think they're not going to be compatible let me know.

GPU - Gigabyte GTX 670 Windforce 3 £317.60 (scan)
CPU - Intel i5 3.4ghz Ivy Bridge £172.20 (Amazon)
Mobo - Asus P8Z77 - I Deluxe £131.98 (Amazon)
Ram - Corsair Vengeance low profile 8gb £33.36 (officenerd.co.uk)
Case - Bitfenix prodigy black £64.99 (ebuyer)
PSU - ?
HDD - ?, I've been told two HDD's will allow me to capture game footage.
CPU cooler - ?
Windows - I expect 8 comes out soon but I don't know the price yet.

Total so far: £720.12

I'd appreciate any help finishing this build.

Many thanks,
James.

More about : build components

October 14, 2012 8:40:16 PM

Would a corsair x650 be any good as a PSU?
October 14, 2012 9:05:13 PM

The Hyper 212 Evo is a really good budget cpu cooler, as though you are not on a tight budget, there are some better ones, but none will match the performance:p rice ratio of that cooler. Also, I would suggest you not to get Windows 8. It's more like a phone type of deal. Also, only one HDD is needed, it depends what you're doing, but for the average person, 500gb is plenty. As I see you will be recording, and stuff such as that, 1 tb will be plenty. Stay away from seagate, they have lots of HDDs that tend to fail.
Related resources
October 14, 2012 9:46:26 PM

Jimbo on Fire said:
Hi,

I'm building a PC for gaming and making video's, I want to to be able to capture gameplay from my PC and possibly xbox 360.

I'm in the UK and I don't want to spend much over £1000. I've decided on a few parts already, but if you think they're not going to be compatible let me know.

GPU - Gigabyte GTX 670 Windforce 3 £317.60 (scan)
CPU - Intel i5 3.4ghz Ivy Bridge £172.20 (Amazon)
Mobo - Asus P8Z77 - I Deluxe £131.98 (Amazon)
Ram - Corsair Vengeance low profile 8gb £33.36 (officenerd.co.uk)
Case - Bitfenix prodigy black £64.99 (ebuyer)
PSU - ?
HDD - ?, I've been told two HDD's will allow me to capture game footage.
CPU cooler - ?
Windows - I expect 8 comes out soon but I don't know the price yet.

Total so far: £720.12

I'd appreciate any help finishing this build.

Many thanks,
James.


Hey. I'll review each component and give my suggestions.

Firstly, I think the GTX 670 you've selected is the best you can get in your price range. It competes evenly with the Radeon HD 7970; take your pick. The 7970 slightly outperforms the GTX 670, especially when overclocked, and is quieter and cooler, but its really your decision as to which brand you prefer, and is cheaper. Here's a benchmark comparison:

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/508?vs=598

You haven't listed which CPU you're getting, only that it is a 3.4 GHz i5. So I very strongly recommend wither the 3550, if you aren't overclocking, or the 3570-k if you will be overclocking. They are the best 2 i5 CPUs for the money.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-Generation-i5-3550-3-3GHz...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Intel-Generation-i5-3570K-3-40G...

You could again do better for the mobo; the ASRock Extreme 4 Z77 has almost all the exact same features as the ASUS, but for less money. The ASRock also has a couple nifty features, like awesome heat spreaders, and 555 boost. It does, however, have a few USB 3.0 ports less.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Z77-Extreme4-Motherboard-Suppor...

No problem with the low-profile Corsair Vengeance. It's the RAM I usually recommend.

The bitfinix is a bit of an odd choice. Actually, it's a very odd choice. Why do you want a tiny ITX case? I'd strongly suggest a good mid-tower ATX case, like the Cooler Master Storm Enforcer, for a pound more. Seriously, why the tiny case?

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Coolermaster-Storm-Enforcer-Tow...

You can use the site below to calculate your wattage rating. I would get 650 W if I were you, or 750 W if you plan on future SLI/Crossfire.

http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

You don't need two HDDs to capture footage from your PC; you just need enough space on your hard drive to store the footage. For PC recording, you should get the Western Digital Caviar Black 2 TB. You can also get 1 TB, but I recommend 2 TB since you want to record lots of footage, and to make your system future-proof.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Western-Digital-Caviar-Internal...

You may also consider getting a SSD for your OS, for lightning-fast boot speeds. Or you can upgrade to an SSD in the future, and clone your OS to your new SSD, if you want to shell out the extra money. I strongly recommend the Crucial M4. You can downgrade to 64 GB , or 32GB, also.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Crucial-CT128M4SSD2-128GB-M4-SS...

The best way to capture Xbox footage is with the Blacmagic Pro - a PCI card that you plug into your PC, and plug the cables from your Xbox into. It's quite expensive on Amazon, and there are probably much cheaper ways to do this, but I'm not much of an expert on footage-capturing from consoles. here's the link to the Blackmagic Pro anyway.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blackmagic-Intensity-Pro-adapte...

If you're not overclocking, then either stick with the stock fan or get a small upgrade to a fan like the Cooler Master TX3 EVO. It's a great fan for non-overclocked CPUs. If you ARE overclocking, I recommend the Corsair H60 or H80 water-cooling units. They are excellent for cooling overclocked, CPUs.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Cooler-Master-Hyper-TX3-Tower/d...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Corsair-CWCH60-Water-Cooler/dp/...

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Corsair-CWCH80-Series-Performan...

Get Windows 7, a package with the banner "Upgrade to Windows 8 for $15" on the top. It's their special promotional offer, you can upgrade to 8 when it comes out for only $15 (not sure how many pounds; around 11?).

That about wraps it up. Let me know if you need more help, for things like monitors, speakers, or case fans.







October 14, 2012 10:37:10 PM

I wasn't aware that one storage unit could still be used to capture game footage, maybe it would be an idea to use an SSD for running the os in that case.

I think I'll go with the 670 as I read on another forum that Nvidia hardware has better compatibility with some of the game capture software.

I did originally consider a build in that very case, but after reading some reviews of the prodigy and considering if I'd actually ever use more than a discreet graphics card on the motherboard, I thought a ITX build would be fine. I live in a 1 bedroom and portability would be a big plus for switching rooms when my gf gets the hump with it.

As for overclocking I have absolutely now experience whatsoever, but I would like to find out how to do it and give it a go on this machine. I don't know how realistic a time frame it takes for a novice to learn enough to overclock a PC.

I've been meaning to build this for over a month but I've kept changing my mind, I've promised myself I'll order it this week.

Thanks guy's,

James.
October 14, 2012 11:31:00 PM

Sorry, I have another question. Do people tend to upgrade to sli rather than just swapping out their graphics card?

So for example, if i decided to upgrade in 3 years or so would buying another 670 be cheaper and more powerful than just getting whatever the new card tech is? Also can you run two different cards together?

Thanks,
James
October 15, 2012 2:37:30 AM

Just read your other (ditto) thread on pcgamer. Haven't yet found any reason as to why you'd need 2 HDDs in order to record footage; as long as you have the space, you can record footage to the drive you are playing games on, hence the 2 TB.

No problems with the 670, then. Go for it.

An ITX build may seem useful, but its tiny factor will hinder upgrades in the long run. Plus, its not much smaller then a mid-tower. Upgrading from an ITX case will severely limit your mobo options. If you get a mid-tower, you can still hold a mini-ATX, but a tiny case can never hold a larger mobo. For upgradability alone, I very, very strongly recommend you get a proper mid-tower case. Seriously mate. It will help you greatly in the long run.

Portability will be the same either way; unplug a couple cables, put the case in a suitcase, transport, plug back in. Its not going to be as portable as a laptop, ever.

I repeat, yet again; go for the mid-tower.

Here are a couple links to basic overclocking guides. Start with understanding overclocking CPUs; the theory is the same for GPUs.

To put it simply, "clocks" refers to the number of processes a component, like the processor or the graphics card, performs in a certain time frame. "Clocking" refers to the number of cycles, in GHz, giga hertz.

Normal Clocking = Normal Cycles = Normal Performance = Normal Lifespan

Under Clocking = Less Cycles = Less Performance = Longer Lifespan

Over Clocking = More Cycles = More Performance = Shorter Lifespan

That's about it. The difference in lifespan isn't insanely high, like a year or something, unless you overclock waay to much. Same goes for underclocking.

Here are those guides:

http://www.anandtech.com/show/5763/undervolting-and-ove...

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/ivy-bridge-overcloc...

The most important thing about overclocking is knowing your limits, and not crossing them. Otherwise, you should be fine.




October 15, 2012 8:11:10 PM

Jimbo on Fire said:
Sorry, I have another question. Do people tend to upgrade to sli rather than just swapping out their graphics card?

So for example, if i decided to upgrade in 3 years or so would buying another 670 be cheaper and more powerful than just getting whatever the new card tech is? Also can you run two different cards together?

Thanks,
James


It really depends on you. The only real downside to SLI/Crossfire is (a) it uses up a slot in your case (not a problem with a decent case and (b) it will produce a little over twice the heat of THAT single card. The heat is the only real issue, and that can be taken care of with a proper ventilation system easily.

HOWEVER, also note that high-end cards that perform as good as two mid-end cards usually generate a TON of heat, and use a lot of electricity ANYWAY; two cards don't always generate more heat, and vice versa.

At the end of the day, compare the specs of two cards, and that of a card you may wish to buy in the far future. If the card you're buying is already mid-high-end, then chances are its better to get another one and save money with your first card, and then, after 10 years or so, upgrade to a new system. I'm getting the HD 7870, and I will upgrade to Crossfire, not buy a new card.
!