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Building my first Gaming PC

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October 15, 2012 5:08:51 PM

This is going to be the very first time for me to build a computer and let alone a higher spec PC Gaming computer. My dad does a lot of electronics etc and I ain't exactly dumb. But this is brand new territory, my reasoning is that I can build a better computer myself that the prices I am getting from people to do it for me. I am talking not £100 but like £200-£300 cheaper if I done it myself.

I am not interested in Overclocking what so ever. I may decide to do this further down the line but for now it is of no interest to me. I am stuck in between two ideas, which is do I buy a motherboard, CPU, RAM bundle where it is pre-installed. Or do I buy maybe a better motherboard or RAM and do the installation myself?

I have been watching many videos and reading up and it seems that installing the CPU isn't to hard (lifting off the catch taking off the tab, making sure the yellow corner on the cpu matches where it is on the motherboard) Not having to apply thermal paste as it comes stock on the cooler that comes with the chip.

The rest however is a mystery, I have been wondering for a while and I am going to go with a i5 3570K and a GTX 670 as a standard. I have a £900 budget which won't stretch much and the case I am going for is a coolermaster CM690 II Advanced as it is on an offer and is £25 cheaper.

The rest however is a mystery to me Motherboard wise, RAM I am considering corsair vengence for a start and go 16GB if that is ample or should I tone down to just 8GB?

The rest I would like your help with

Many thanks

More about : building gaming

October 15, 2012 5:53:59 PM

One slight anomoly, is that you say you don't want to overclock CPU, but have chosen a CPU that is unlocked, specifically to permit overclocking. If that is to enable you to overclock it, in the future, that's fine. There's nothing which says you must overclock it, but you should, then, ensure the SYSTEM is capable, for the future. If you use a Z77 motherboard, like an ASRock Z77 Extreme 4, or Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H. Then, all you need, as and when, you want to overclock, is to change the stock cooler, for a better one. Those motherboards would also allow you, however unlikely, to add a second graphics card in SLi, for a surround vision system.
On the other hand, if you don't EVER want to OC processor, you could have a cheaper build, using, say, i5-3450 and a H77 mobo. The initial loss in performance, would be small, and would reduce initial costs. You would, of course, then, not be able to OC processor, or add 2nd nVidia card.
October 15, 2012 6:24:21 PM

Don't get a 3570K if you arent going to overclock. Youre spending extra money for nothing.

And installing the CPU is easy as long as you ground yourself.
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October 15, 2012 6:39:16 PM

I am going with the i5 3570K for overclocking in the future, so I'd rather have it now and then use that feature in the near future. Also I am aiming to get a 2nd GTX 670 down the line but I am talking months and not weeks or days.

The bit that I find awful to look at is the wiring and cable management. Are there manuals in the products to tell you what everything requires or where they go? I have read the motherboard tells you etc.

Also is there a good PSU out there I could buy I have been looking at some and people are like this is good and at the same time their like it makes noises etc. I found a good OCZ 750W PSU for like £80 but I am not good in this area.

Also I am aware of earthing myself and we do have the strap on one from when we had our very first family computer (The ram kept popping out).

Compared to the ASROCK motherboard what other alternatives are there that carry similar features?
October 15, 2012 6:51:45 PM

Corsair, Antec, PC Power & Cooling, and Seasonic all make great power supplies. A GOOD 750W should do the trick.

Cable management is more of an asthetic thing. If you want the inside to look good, then cable management is a must. It also can't be so bad that it restricts airflow to the components.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_56kyib-Ls

There's a video on how to do the whole thing.
October 15, 2012 8:00:43 PM

Probably best power supplies, to allow for 2nd GX 670, in UK are XFX Pro Series 750w 80 Plus Silver Modular around £93, or Corsair TX750M 80 Plus Bronze Semi-modular around £88.
For motherboard, decent budget options would be ASRock Z77 Extreme 4, or Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H. Both do all you need. For high performance, feature rich boards, there are ones like Asus P8Z77-V Pro, or Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H, although more expensive.
For RAM, if you go for 8GB (2x4GB) 1600 MHz C9 DDR3 low profile RAM, like GSKill Ares, Crucial Ballistix Sport, or Corsair CML, that'll be fine.
The full manuals, certainly from better motherboard manufacturers, are pretty comprehensive. Take the trouble to download, and read it cover to cover (quite a read, with some of them). If you understand it all, you'll be fine. If you don't, ASK, don't GUESS and you won't go far wrong.
October 17, 2012 9:08:03 AM

Finding the ASRock Z77 extreme 4 at a cheap price is hard but I might bite the bullet and go with amazon as they have it in stock, other places have it at the same price but without any stock.

I looked as well as the MSI Z77A GD65 or the Gigabyte ZZXUD3H....but amazon have the ASRock Z77 Extrene 6 for £130 so i think that might be a good deal in itself
October 17, 2012 10:05:09 AM

One last thing, I am not over locking for the first few months but I was worried about temperatures my room is quite cold and will be across winter. Il have the gigabyte 3 fan gtx 670 and am wondering if the stock intel CPU cooler will do fine for now. Most people say it is fine. It also has per applied thermal paste correct?
October 17, 2012 11:37:07 AM

You certainly will be OK with stock cooler, until you want to overclock. On the other hand, as you may well want to "experiment" fairly soon, there is a lot to be said for fitting AM cooler, from the start, and save the hassle of changing.
October 17, 2012 11:40:58 AM

malbluff said:
You certainly will be OK with stock cooler, until you want to overclock. On the other hand, as you may well want to "experiment" fairly soon, there is a lot to be said for fitting AM cooler, from the start, and save the hassle of changing.


Yer I guess that may well be done from the start, people recommend the coolermaster hyper 212 as a good aftermarket cooler. You've been such a big help to me. I mean I got quoted a system for £1050 but I am building it for around £980 but with a better card, HDD, motherboard, memory, power supply and includes a 120gb SSD for windows to boot on.
October 17, 2012 12:16:33 PM

The 212 EVO, not the plain 212. One thing, you mention a good deal on a 690 case. Be a little careful. There are several different versions, of that case, and I have found that some sellers don't make it clear WHICH version they are offering.
October 17, 2012 12:37:07 PM

malbluff said:
The 212 EVO, not the plain 212. One thing, you mention a good deal on a 690 case. Be a little careful. There are several different versions, of that case, and I have found that some sellers don't make it clear WHICH version they are offering.


Yer I noticed this myself and have ordered the cooler master II advanced USB 3.0 ATX case which I believe is the correct version not the midi tower which I believe is smaller.
October 17, 2012 1:58:26 PM

I was thinking of one for a build, a few months ago, but found so many slightly different specs, on different sites, that I gave up. Pity, cos it's quite a good case. If you are definitely getting the Avanced, with USB3, should be OK. If struggling for mobo, the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H isn't bad, at reasonable price. (the X is important, if you want crossfire ability).
October 17, 2012 8:35:54 PM

malbluff said:
I was thinking of one for a build, a few months ago, but found so many slightly different specs, on different sites, that I gave up. Pity, cos it's quite a good case. If you are definitely getting the Avanced, with USB3, should be OK. If struggling for mobo, the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-D3H isn't bad, at reasonable price. (the X is important, if you want crossfire ability).

Well it is listed as an ATX case so it better be haha, I might down the line upgrade the CPU and SLI with two gtx 670s but I don't know yet I think I've got a pretty good rig developing here. I like the look of thevASRock and the msi z77a gd65 also the gigabyte you mentioned before.
October 19, 2012 7:29:20 PM

Well I have managed to buy a Asus Sabertooth Z77 motherboard for only £149 which should be arriving here soon.

I am a little worried that I have enough cooling. If I was just to go stock I am having a Gigabyte GTX 670 (3 fan version) and with that (non overclocking anything as of the moment. The stock cooler on the i5 3570k. The case itself has 120mm or 140mm I can't remember fans one at the top one on the front and one on the back. The PSU I will make it face down so the heat goes out the bottom.

I think that should remain cool enough in my opinion, or should I buy another fan to go on the side or something?
October 22, 2012 10:35:44 PM

Bump

I really need this to be answered :/  I am really hoping that none of the of this breaks before I have even built the machine haha. I just ordered my RAM and am now waiting for the last of the money to be put into my account until I then order my GTX 670. I wonder if one more fan would be enough.

The only thing that confused me is where do I put all these fans? can some go straight into the power supply?
October 23, 2012 12:17:45 AM

You don't need to add any fans, or take any "special measures". The built in fans are designed to easilly take care of a system, like yours, even with modest overclocking. If you should add a 2nd graphics card, or want to overclock, agressively, THEN you may need to add, or change something. If you instal everything, as it's meant to be, and run the fans from the motherboard, the system will look after temperatures, automatically. Obviously, initially, you should monitor the temperatures, to ensure everything is working correctly, but there shouldn't be any problems.
There's plenty of help, should you have any issues, and plenty of videos, on line, for guidance.
October 23, 2012 10:13:25 AM

malbluff said:
You don't need to add any fans, or take any "special measures". The built in fans are designed to easilly take care of a system, like yours, even with modest overclocking. If you should add a 2nd graphics card, or want to overclock, agressively, THEN you may need to add, or change something. If you instal everything, as it's meant to be, and run the fans from the motherboard, the system will look after temperatures, automatically. Obviously, initially, you should monitor the temperatures, to ensure everything is working correctly, but there shouldn't be any problems.
There's plenty of help, should you have any issues, and plenty of videos, on line, for guidance.


Thank you for getting back to me, I was always making sure that it should be cool enough for nothing to overheat, it is also a massive case so air flow should be going round a quite spacious system. I am glad I the stock cooler comes with pre-applied thermal paste. I have a big front and top fan and a pretty big back of the chassis fan.

My Spec is as follows:

Cooler Master CM690 II advanced

Intel i5 3570K (Using Stock Cooler)

Corsair TX750W V2 PSU

Asus Z77 Sabertooth Mobo (I know some say its an expensive gimmick but it dropped to around £169 but then I go £40 voucher off of it that I had for a while. So for £129 it was well worth it in my eyes)

Corsair Vengeance 16GB RAM

Gigabyte GTX 670 (3 fan version)

1TB WD Blue Caviar HDD

Intel 120GB SSD

Asus 24X DVD Writer

Windows 7 64 Bit OS


October 23, 2012 10:52:56 AM

That all looks fine. The only comment I would make is that Samsung 830, OCZ Vertex 4, and Crucial M4, are all regarded as better, than Intel, for SSD.
750w PSU is plenty, to allow you to add a 2nd GPU. That is the time you are likely to need to "adjust" ventilation, probably not before.
October 23, 2012 10:57:07 AM

malbluff said:
That all looks fine. The only comment I would make is that Samsung 830, OCZ Vertex 4, and Crucial M4, are all regarded as better, than Intel, for SSD.
750w PSU is plenty, to allow you to add a 2nd GPU. That is the time you are likely to need to "adjust" ventilation, probably not before.


Ok I will take a look at the others you have stated, by the way can I have the fan of the PSU pointing down at all? I didn't think you can, but I just thought I have asked. I have been reading a lot of people asking so many questions where as for myself I have been reading up everything and comparing everything from my own back.

The SSD and the GFX Card are the only thing I need to get so I am glad you mentioned them before I have considered my purchase haha :) 
!