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Wow gaming computer

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October 16, 2012 1:40:00 AM

Hello,
Approximate Purchase Date: ASAP

Budget Range: total of 1400

System Usage from Most to Least Important: mostly gaming world of Warcraft then diablo 3 and star craft 2, basic internet searching lol.

Parts Not Required: keyboard, mouse, monitor, speakers.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts:i have been looking at memory express but i am open to suggestions

Country: Canada

Parts Preferences: i would like to do Intel Core™ i7-3770K Processor, 3.50GHz w/ 8MB Cache
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38982

Overclocking: Maybe

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

Monitor Resolution: i don't know i am going to hdmi it to a 21" tv

Additional Comments: i have looked around for about 3 weeks and i have gone to memory express. this is what he said i should get:
Zalman Z11 Plus HF1 Mid Tower Case
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX39567

Intel Core™ i7-3770K Processor, 3.50GHz w/ 8MB Cache
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38982

Asus P8Z77-V PRO w/ Dual DDR3 1600, 7.1 Audio, Gigabit Lan, WiFi, SLI / 3-Way CrossFireX
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38188

Patriot Viper 3 Series, Black Mamba Edition DDR3 8GB (2 x 4GB) PC3-12800 Dual Channel Kit
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX41036

Intel SSD 330 Series SATA III Solid State Drive Kit, 180GB
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38918

Samsung SH-224BB/BEBE 24X DVD±RW SATA, Black, OEM
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX41354

Asus GTX660 Ti DirectCU II OC Edition, Geforce GTX 660 Ti, 2GB, PCI-E w/ Dual DVI, HDMI, DisplayPort
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX41389

Gaming Series GS600 V2 Power Supply
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX40923

Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium x64 (64-bit) SP1 DVD - OEM
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX32996

the total of this was 1500 i feel like its more then i need but i don't know enouph about computers to understand were i can save money and still have a good computer for my games

More about : wow gaming computer

October 16, 2012 1:57:29 AM

The i7 is definite overkill and won't really improve your game performance over an i5. You also don't need to spend that much on the motherboard, and if you don't plan on playing anything more intensive than WoW on a single monitor, you could step the GPU down to a vanilla 660 or a 7870.

I've never used Patriot memory before, so I can't vouch for them.

Everything else looks fine.

I also notice you don't have a secondary storage HDD. Is the SSD capacity alone going to be sufficient for you?
October 16, 2012 2:03:02 AM

If you want the 3770k it's fine but you will not need hyperthreading so you're wasting 100$. The motherboard is great but might more then what you need. If you're tv is 720p, the 660ti is overkill and you might want to get something cheaper. For the ssd, i would get a 120gb ssd as a boot drive and a couple of games and a regular hdd for storage.

I would also recommend you buying from NCIX. I never had a problem with them and they have low prices or if they don't, you just pricematch with another website.
Related resources
October 16, 2012 2:10:10 AM

Erm... this entire rig is overkill, except for the SSD, which is too slow.

At best for 1080p WoW playing, you need a lower end i5 and a GTX 660ti. That's to run every setting maxxed at 60 fps.

You could be spending a LOT less money for the same exact visible performance... spending more is a waste, especially since WoW is the most intense gaming you're going to be doing.
October 16, 2012 2:14:35 AM

Used your planned rig as a baseline and made some tweaks. I think you'd be very happy with this build for $400 less:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($55.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Zalman Z11 Plus HF1 ATX Mid Tower Case ($71.34 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ CompUSA)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.11 @ Amazon)
Total: $1082.36
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)


Could still shave off some more in a few areas if needed, but I think this is a fairly balanced build that would suit your purposes better and still leave you some headroom for the future. With the money saved, you could even bump the GPU back up a few notches just for the sake of futureproofing, but if you were to do that I'd go straight for a GTX 670 or a 7970 for ~$150 more. Either of those would be able to run any game you want to throw at it for the next several years. If you're planning to just stick with less demanding titles like WoW, I'd say just pocket the cash and stick with the 660 / 7870.
October 16, 2012 2:18:00 AM

thank you for the reply's. the reason i want the i7 is so i can make the computer last 2-4 years and just upgrade as needed. if you still think its not worth it should i do a i5 with a overclock? i'm not to exspereanced with computer components so some links would help me out allot. and the 2nd hard drive i was going to add at a later date i have a 500gb external for storing the stuff i don't need right away.
October 16, 2012 2:31:34 AM

ckholt83 said:
Used your planned rig as a baseline and made some tweaks. I think you'd be very happy with this build for $400 less:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($55.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Zalman Z11 Plus HF1 ATX Mid Tower Case ($71.34 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ CompUSA)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.11 @ Amazon)
Total: $1082.36
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)


Could still shave off some more in a few areas if needed, but I think this is a fairly balanced build that would suit your purposes better and still leave you some headroom for the future. With the money saved, you could even bump the GPU back up a few notches just for the sake of futureproofing, but if you were to do that I'd go straight for a GTX 670 or a 7970 for ~$150 more. Either of those would be able to run any game you want to throw at it for the next several years. If you're planning to just stick with less demanding titles like WoW, I'd say just pocket the cash and stick with the 660 / 7870.


now if i did this build would it run wow on ultra without any problems. and thank you for the time you put in on this build i appreciated it allot.
October 16, 2012 2:32:08 AM

ckholt83 said:

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Xigmatek GAIA SD1283 56.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($55.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Zalman Z11 Plus HF1 ATX Mid Tower Case ($71.34 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ CompUSA)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($92.11 @ Amazon)
Total: $1082.36
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

OP is from Canada, prices are not valid.
October 16, 2012 2:34:33 AM

The i7 is only better for certain kinds of usage, high end productivity type stuff. For gaming, the i5 will last you just as long.

There are tons of benchmarks out there, but here's just one as an example:
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/cpu-charts-2012/-20-...

The i5 3570k is less than 1 FPS difference compared to the i7 3770k.
October 16, 2012 2:39:01 AM

I played WoW (Cataclysm, haven't given MOP a shot yet) maxxed everything @ 192x1080 with my i3-2100 and 6850 getting 45-50fps. Your rig is WAY overkill. You should be looking at BF3 and MOH: WF for something to tax your system.
October 16, 2012 2:39:31 AM

ckholt83 said:
The i7 is only better for certain kinds of usage, high end productivity type stuff. For gaming, the i5 will last you just as long.

There are tons of benchmarks out there, but here's just one as an example:
http://www.tomshardware.com/charts/cpu-charts-2012/-20-...

The i5 3570k is less than 1 FPS difference compared to the i7 3770k.



how many mb cache should i do with the i5
October 16, 2012 2:41:36 AM

greennova420 said:
how many mb cache should i do with the i5

mb cache?
October 16, 2012 2:44:46 AM

Don't listen to people who don't play WoW.
From this page:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...
"Where we do see the potential for Sandy Bridge-E to drive additional performance is in processor-bound games like World of Warcraft or the multiplayer component of Battlefield 3."
Warcraft benefits from a faster CPU. I'm not saying get a Sandy-E, but the 3770k seems like a good compromise.
You can get a bigger/better SSD for the same money, use www.pcpartpicker.com to check prices and buy low. You can get a 256GB Samsung 830 for the price you listed (doh, you're Canadian, not sure of price comparisons, but use the site I mentioned). SSD really helps when zoning in and out of instances or jumping over to your bank toon for that mat you need.
Granted, most people are correct that a mid-range GPU won't bottleneck you if you're only playing at 1080, but you want some headroom if you're in a zerg run LFR 25 man raid and the AOE is going hard and fast.
Definitely save some money on the MB, doubt you need one that high-end.
October 16, 2012 2:48:21 AM

robertrobert said:
Don't listen to people who don't play WoW.
From this page:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...
"Where we do see the potential for Sandy Bridge-E to drive additional performance is in processor-bound games like World of Warcraft or the multiplayer component of Battlefield 3."
Warcraft benefits from a faster CPU. I'm not saying get a Sandy-E, but the 3770k seems like a good compromise.
You can get a bigger/better SSD for the same money, use www.pcpartpicker.com to check prices and buy low. You can get a 256GB Samsung 830 for the price you listed (doh, you're Canadian, not sure of price comparisons, but use the site I mentioned). SSD really helps when zoning in and out of instances or jumping over to your bank toon for that mat you need.
Granted, most people are correct that a mid-range GPU won't bottleneck you if you're only playing at 1080, but you want some headroom if you're in a zerg run LFR 25 man raid and the AOE is going hard and fast.
Definitely save some money on the MB, doubt you need one that high-end.


can you sujest a mb for me please
October 16, 2012 3:08:33 AM

greennova420 said:
adn should i stick with the graphics card or should i down size on that

I would suggest a 7870. I guess it should be able to play WoW at highest setting without any difficulty and it will not die as fast as the 660ti under AA.

greennova420 said:
also should i get a spu cooler?

A spu cooler? do you mean a psu cooler or a cpu cooler?
October 16, 2012 3:13:53 AM

2260121 said:
I would suggest a 7870. I guess it should be able to play WoW at highest setting without any difficulty and it will not die as fast as the 660ti under AA.


A spu cooler? do you mean a psu cooler or a cpu cooler?


cpu
October 16, 2012 3:17:31 AM

greennova420 said:
cpu

If you're overclocking it's vital.
October 16, 2012 3:23:02 AM

I'm sure there will be an October update soon, but check this page:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...
"The Radeon HD 7870 sets a new standard for what we expect from a sub-$300 GPU. With performance comparable to the GeForce GTX 580 and kissing the heels of AMD's own Radeon HD 7950, this card represents one of the best enthusiast-oriented values we've seen in recent memory."
It seems like the 7870 is better than the 660 depending on price at the time. If you think you'll ever upgrade your monitor to something better than 1080, I'd get a 2GB card.
I got the big fancy Noctua CPU cooler since I wanted a quiet system, my system is in the living room. If noise isn't an issue and you won't be OCing, then try the stock cooler for now.
I went with the Asus P8Z77-V, not the 'Pro' version. I couldn't see anything that the Pro had that I needed for the extra $20.
October 16, 2012 3:38:32 AM

That's the model I have. The BIOS is easy to understand and tweak, make sure you upgrade the firmware, format the USB stick for flash bios upgrade to NTFS, not FAT. That took me an hour to figure out.
I haven't tried the WiFi on it, my computer is right next to the router.
CrossFire and SLI have been a mixed bag in WoW, don't depend on it. But I'm sure we'll be playing Titan in 2 years anyway, so don't sweat it.
October 16, 2012 3:39:14 AM

2260121 said:
OP is from Canada, prices are not valid.


top right corner has a drop down menu where OP can choose any country they want.
October 16, 2012 3:51:11 AM

so all i need now is a power supply i want it to be Bronze Certified. this is the one that they suggested
Gaming Series GS600 V2 Power Supply
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX40923
will this work for what i need or can i try and save some on this to any suggestions?
October 16, 2012 3:59:41 AM

and this is what i have changed so far


Zalman Z11 Plus HF1 Mid Tower Case
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX39567

Core™ i7-3770K Processor, 3.50GHz w/ 8MB Cache
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38982

Asus P8Z77-V w/ Dual DDR3 1600, 7.1 Audio, Gigabit Lan, WiFi, SLI / 3-Way CrossFireX
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38189

Patriot Viper 3 Series, Black Mamba Edition DDR3 8GB (2 x 4GB) PC3-12800 Dual Channel Kit
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX41036

Intel SSD 330 Series SATA III Solid State Drive Kit, 120GB
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX38915

Samsung SH-224BB/BEBE 24X DVD±RW SATA, Black, OEM
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX41354

Gigabyte Radeon HD 7870 OC 2GB PCI-E w/ DVI, HDMI, Dual DP
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX39701

Gaming Series GS600 V2 Power Supply
http://www.memoryexpress.com/Products/MX40923
October 16, 2012 4:03:04 AM

BTW, you can catch my PSU on sale for $99, don't pay what newegg is charging at the moment.
Always use pcpartpicker to know when to buy low. I saved >$100 waiting for sales.
October 16, 2012 5:14:16 AM

robertrobert said:
Don't listen to people who don't play WoW.
From this page:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...
"Where we do see the potential for Sandy Bridge-E to drive additional performance is in processor-bound games like World of Warcraft or the multiplayer component of Battlefield 3."
Warcraft benefits from a faster CPU. I'm not saying get a Sandy-E, but the 3770k seems like a good compromise.
You can get a bigger/better SSD for the same money, use www.pcpartpicker.com to check prices and buy low. You can get a 256GB Samsung 830 for the price you listed (doh, you're Canadian, not sure of price comparisons, but use the site I mentioned). SSD really helps when zoning in and out of instances or jumping over to your bank toon for that mat you need.
Granted, most people are correct that a mid-range GPU won't bottleneck you if you're only playing at 1080, but you want some headroom if you're in a zerg run LFR 25 man raid and the AOE is going hard and fast.
Definitely save some money on the MB, doubt you need one that high-end.


I'm sorry, but Robertrobert doesn't really seem to know what he's talking about. Yes, WoW is more processor dependent than most games, but that dependence is still primarily tied to single thread performance. WoW does benefit somewhat from multithreading, but NOT from HyperThreading, which is the main difference between an i7 and an i5. Here is a fairly layman's terms article that talks about it a little bit, slightly dated but still relevant: http://www.thegeeklynews.com/2011/07/the-myth-of-hyper-...

The quote you pulled from Tom's CPU guide is also wildly out of context. Did you even read the rest of the page? Let me highlight a few other significant snippets from the SAME PAGE:

"CPUs priced over $230 offer rapidly diminishing returns when it comes to game performance. As such, we have a hard time recommending anything more expensive than the Core i5-3570K"

"Our tests demonstrate fairly little difference between a $225 LGA 1155 Core i5-2500K and a $1000 LGA 2011 Core i7-3960X, even when three-way graphics card configurations are involved."

And here's the quote you used IN FULL: "Where we do see the potential for Sandy Bridge-E to drive additional performance is in processor-bound games like World of Warcraft or the multiplayer component of Battlefield 3. If you're running a three- or four-way array of graphics cards already, there's a good chance that you already own more than enough rendering muscle. An overclocked Core i7-3960X or -3930K could help the rest of your platform catch up to an insanely powerful arrangement of GPUs."

To my understanding, the OP is not planning on running a 3-way SLI of GTX 680s or 7970s.

Furthermore, the reason why the Sandy Bridge E chips have greater potential for processor-bound games like WoW is because they are monstrous beefy hex-core chips, and NOT because of HyperThreading, so your argument that an i7 is a good compromise is completely invalid.

If you were to click one page further into the article you linked (here: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...), you would also notice that the i5 3570k is in the exact same top tier of gaming CPUs as both the i7 3770k AND ALSO THE $500+ SANDY BRIDGE E 3930k you referenced, as well as the even more expensive thousand dollar 3960k.

Anything more than an i5 3570k is a waste for your purposes, save the $100 difference and drop it into your other components.

The build I put together for you is fine, you just need to find Canadian retailers for those parts if you can't order from Newegg/Amazon or whatever. 2260121 suggests NCIX.
October 16, 2012 5:45:12 AM

Here is a revised build using parts only from NCIX:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($215.99 @ NCIX US)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($27.98 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($180.30 @ NCIX US)
Memory: Kingston Blu 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($45.64 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($213.41 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Asus Radeon HD 7870 2GB Video Card ($229.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Zalman Z11 Plus HF1 ATX Mid Tower Case ($71.34 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: XFX 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ NCIX US)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($126.98 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1244.61
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

PCPartPicker only has the US variant of NCIX listed, but I assume that their inventory is the same across the border.
October 16, 2012 6:36:00 AM

As I said, don't listen to a tech geek, listen to a player. If you're running in a 25 man raid with addons galore and FRAPS in the background, you'll benefit from the i7.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/best-gaming-cpu-cor...
"What’s interesting here is that StarCraft 2 seems to differentiate between architecture and cache more so than core count. This isn't too far from what we found in World Of Warcraft: Cataclysm--Tom's Performance Guide"
This kind of negates his argument.
http://www.techspot.com/review/305-starcraft2-performan...
"When it comes to picking the right CPU for this game things become a little trickier. Generally when testing first person shooters we find that a budget quad-core processor will deliver similar performance than a more expensive high-end model, such as the Core i7 920. However real-time strategy games are often more demanding on the CPU side and StarCraft II is no exception."
So many people who play the latest FPS don't realize how bloated and not optimized WoW is. Blizzard should be commended for making a 7 year old engine look as good as it does, but it comes with lots of overhead.
Also from that article:
"The extra threads of the Core i7 920 processor are no advantage when compared to the Core i5 750 in this game, but the additional memory capacity and bandwidth is. The Core i7 920 was 11% faster when comparing the clock for clock data at 3.70GHz which is quite significant."
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/world-of-warcraft-c...
"And how about processors? After all, games are impacted most forcefully by the power of your GPU. WoW, it appears, bucks that trend to a large degree. Without question, we see the best performance on Intel CPUs with remarkable scaling from 100 FPS down to 60ish frames per second with a GeForce GTX 480 at 1680x1050 (Ultra quality) as you shed clock rate, cores, and cache. We've said it before and we'll say it again: when it comes to gaming, balance is everything. Don't buy a high-end graphics card if you're using a mid-ranged processor; you'll simply handicap the GPU, failing to realize its potential. In this case, an overclocked Core i5 serves up reasonable performance, but a Core i7 is undoubtedly the gold standard if you're rocking a fancy graphics card."
Do you want the gold standard? Do you want an improvement that is quite significant?
Given that you're powering a 21" TV (is it even a monitor?) I would argue a 7870 is an insanely powerful GPU. So, yes, the i7 will benefit you.
If it's in your budget and you want the performance, get it. If you want to save money, the build ckholt listed is fine.
I'll say it again, "undoubtedly". So don't doubt it.
October 16, 2012 3:09:43 PM

So you're telling the OP to negate what the "tech geeks" said and go with someone who plays the game? Sounds legit. Now I'm telling the OP that I'm playing the MOP starter kit on my i3-2100, 8gb, Radeon 6850 with everything maxed out and I haven't seen my FPS drop below 60 @ 1920x1080. Now if my quaint little system is pushing out a constant 60 FPS, I think the OP is good with whatever they go with. Granted, I'm sure if I were to hop into some 10 / 25 mans, there would be some concern. But my rig is bottom of the ladder, an $200 i5-2500K smokes my rig.

Remember too, there is no difference between 60, 70, or 100 FPS.

Just for S&G's here's the WoW: MoP system requirements.
Minimum Specifications

Dual core CPU @ 1.4 Ghz.
2GB RAM (or 1GB for Windows XP)
Radeon X1800 Pro
GeForce FX 6800
25gb HDD space
1024x768 minimum resolution

Recommended Specifications

Intel Core 2 Duo 2.2 GHz or AMD Athlon 64 X2
4GB RAM
64bit Windows 7
Nvidia 8800GT
AMD 4830 512MB

We all know that these are just a guideline and really have no bearing. But I find it interesting that the "recommended" CPU is a Core 2 Duo but the OP needs the brute force of an unlocked i7...sounds legit.
October 16, 2012 3:25:48 PM

My .02 cents here. Do Not get an AMD card for WoW. Stick to Nvidia if WoW is your main focus. There are a ton of people having issues specifically with AMD and crashing :) .

Don't feel like reiterating / posting forum links and tom links like i did for another thread the last day or so. SO do your own research and google it :) .

October 16, 2012 4:39:39 PM

I agree with ^ about AMD cards. Besides, NVIDIA meshes w/ Intel better than AMD.

Also, if you plan on playing some RTS games, like it seems, you will want to spend money in video, cause lots of different things moving on 1 screen REALLY taxes ur video. I would say a 660 Ti would be enough, but 670 would definitely last a little longer.

They are right though, the i5 will last just as long as the i7 gaming wise. the main difference between the two is hyper threading, giving you 8 "cores" instead of just 4, but games don't really use multi-threading enough to utilize the extra cores, so u want a faster speed processor, and i5's run cooler than i7's, meaning u can OC them better
October 16, 2012 4:44:32 PM

PC builders pro tip:

Don't skimp on GPU at build, but leave ur PC SLI capable.
Then a year down the road you can SLI and gain 80% performance on the cheap.
!