Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Intel Haswell VS Intel Haswell-E

Tags:
  • CPUs
  • Intel
  • Intel i5
Last response: in CPUs
Share
February 28, 2013 2:42:17 PM

I was planning on upgrading to an i5 4670K in June when the haswell cpus are released, but I just read that Haswell-E chips will be out end of this year. I'm currently using an AMD Phenom II X6 1090T BE and I was just wondering if there will be a significant difference between the Haswell and Haswell-E. Should I just upgrade to Haswell in June or wait until the end of the year for Haswell-E? Thanks.

More about : intel haswell intel haswell

a c 487 à CPUs
a c 121 å Intel
February 28, 2013 4:07:42 PM

So far Haswell-E is just a rumor. The likely difference between Haswell and Haswell-E is 4 cores vs. 6 cores, more internal cache, full PCI-e 3.0 2x 16 lane support + 1x 8 lane support. Maybe even 3x 16 lane support. Just speculating...

Will Haswell-E be a better gaming CPU than Haswell? Sure... as long as you don't mind dropping the $$$$ for it.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2013 4:22:52 PM

Pretty sure it's Haswell summer '13, IB-E Q3/Q4 '13, Haswell-E who knows when.
Score
0
Related resources
February 28, 2013 4:47:59 PM

It's rumoured that Intel will be skipping IB-E and going straight to Haswell-E. But like jaguarskx said, it is all speculation. I think what I'm probably going to do is go with Haswell this summer, since I just want to get rid of my 1090T as soon as possible. Do you guys think the Haswell-E will be using the same motherboard type as Haswell? Because if so, I can upgrade to Haswell-E later on if I want to.
Score
0
a c 487 à CPUs
a c 121 å Intel
February 28, 2013 5:10:45 PM

Haswell-E will not be using socket 1150. It is not even clear if it will be socket 2011 (Sandy Bridge-E) either.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2013 5:22:43 PM

jaguarskx said:
Haswell will not be using socket 1150. It is not even clear if it will be socket 2011 (Sandy Bridge-E) either.


Source? iirc it was just a rumor, and it's since been clarified that it'll only be dual-core processors that will use BGA.
(http://www.techpowerup.com/177817/Intel-Haswell-and-Bro...)
Score
0
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2013 6:39:47 PM

Ivybridge E not Haswell E.
Score
0
February 28, 2013 6:47:46 PM

sarinaide said:
Ivybridge E not Haswell E.


Sphynx91 said:
It's rumoured that Intel will be skipping IB-E and going straight to Haswell-E.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2013 7:11:18 PM

I will tell you now IvyBridge E will come out this year... you can thank me later.
Score
0
February 28, 2013 7:11:48 PM

the power of cpus can only go so far on a socket, if they want to push more power out they'd need to make a better socket design, (this is if they've already maxed out)
Score
0
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2013 7:35:39 PM

Its all rumors
Score
0
a c 487 à CPUs
a c 121 å Intel
February 28, 2013 8:00:50 PM

xomm said:
Source? iirc it was just a rumor, and it's since been clarified that it'll only be dual-core processors that will use BGA.
(http://www.techpowerup.com/177817/Intel-Haswell-and-Bro...)


Sorry, it was a typo. It should have been "Haswell-E".

My post was in response to someone asking if Haswell-E can be used the same motherboard as a Haswell CPU.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
February 28, 2013 9:07:50 PM

Haswell-E, not for a long long time, Ivy Bridge - E is only barely listed on Intels roadmap as it is and thats not coming till Q4 2013
Score
0
a c 103 à CPUs
a b å Intel
February 28, 2013 9:19:10 PM

jaguarskx said:
just a rumor


J_E_D_70 said:
who knows


Sphynx91 said:
it is all speculation


jaguarskx said:
It is not even clear


xomm said:
just a rumor


redeemer said:
Its all rumors


That's about all there is to say at the moment.
Score
0
a b à CPUs
March 1, 2013 4:23:47 AM

IvyBridge E is definite thats all I will say.
Score
0
March 1, 2013 4:30:49 AM

Ok. Thank you all for all the info you have provided. I'll most likely be going with the Haswell in June this year since Haswell-E is apparently nowhere to be seen.
Score
0
June 2, 2013 11:04:22 AM

Sphynx91 said:
I was planning on upgrading to an i5 4670K in June when the haswell cpus are released, but I just read that Haswell-E chips will be out end of this year. I'm currently using an AMD Phenom II X6 1090T BE and I was just wondering if there will be a significant difference between the Haswell and Haswell-E. Should I just upgrade to Haswell in June or wait until the end of the year for Haswell-E? Thanks.


I don't know if this will help you but here: http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/Haswell-E-Haswell-Broadwe...
Score
0
a c 219 à CPUs
a c 130 å Intel
June 2, 2013 11:33:56 AM

Intel is apparently falling behind in their E model processor releases. The Sandy Bridge-E has been out for some time now and the rumored last model to that line has yet to be released (3980x). Meanwhile Ivy Bridge has been out for over a year and now Haswell has just been released at this point it would not surprise me if things were to be skipped or abandoned altogether.
I have the Sandy Bridge-E and can tell you that it uses the LGA 2011 socket and the IB-E and HW-E will also use that socket. The benefit of the E processor is the added lanes of bandwith for the Pci-e slots and support for Pci-e 3.0. Your normal processor, SB , IB and HASWELL all have 16 lanes of bandwidth for the MB's Pci-e slots and unless you get a MB with an added chipset to increase those lanes you will have to run two cards at x8. The 40 lanes of bandwidth that comes with the E processor allow for two video cards to have the full x16 lanes of Pci-e bandwidth.
Score
0
June 2, 2013 12:54:08 PM

inzone said:
The Sandy Bridge-E has been out for some time now and the rumored last model to that line has yet to be released (3980x). Meanwhile Ivy Bridge has been out for over a year and now Haswell has just been released at this point it would not surprise me if things were to be skipped or abandoned altogether.
I have the Sandy Bridge-E and can tell you that it uses the LGA 2011 socket and the IB-E and HW-E will also use that socket.


I was not aware of that rumor of possible 3980X but now after researching about it, everything indicated to Q2 2013, so it would "supposedly" come out this June?
I am planing on making a new build with Sandy Bridge-E too but I still haven't decided which CPU model to pick cuz I want one thing but a good amount of people are all telling me the otherwise.
Score
0
a c 219 à CPUs
a c 130 å Intel
June 2, 2013 2:21:23 PM

When I was looking to buy the Sandy Bridge-E CPU I looked at the 3930k, 3960x and the 3970x along with the 3820 but the 3820 was quickly pushed aside because of the limited overclock. So it became a choice between the other three. After looking at the stock speeds and L caches I decided that the 3960x and 3970x were not worth $500 more, believe me I wanted to get one of those two but for $500 it just made no sense.
With the 3930k I still had a six core and 12mb level 3 cache along with the 40 lanes of bandwidth. Currently I have this CPU overclocked to 4.7ghz with very little effort and the temps are very acceptable although I am using water cooling.

The reason I wanted to go with the 3980x was because it's supposed to be anywhere from 8 to 12 cores and if that is correct then I would switch to it, but if it's another 6 core then no. I haven't heard any news at all lately so I'm starting to think that it's ben scrapped.
Score
0
June 2, 2013 3:53:54 PM

inzone said:
When I was looking to buy the Sandy Bridge-E CPU I looked at the 3930k, 3960x and the 3970x along with the 3820 but the 3820 was quickly pushed aside because of the limited overclock. So it became a choice between the other three. After looking at the stock speeds and L caches I decided that the 3960x and 3970x were not worth $500 more, believe me I wanted to get one of those two but for $500 it just made no sense.
With the 3930k I still had a six core and 12mb level 3 cache along with the 40 lanes of bandwidth. Currently I have this CPU overclocked to 4.7ghz with very little effort and the temps are very acceptable although I am using water cooling.

The reason I wanted to go with the 3980x was because it's supposed to be anywhere from 8 to 12 cores and if that is correct then I would switch to it, but if it's another 6 core then no. I haven't heard any news at all lately so I'm starting to think that it's ben scrapped.


That's exactly the same situation I'm going through right now, i can't seem to be able to decide between the 3930K and the 3970X.
The problem is that, unlike you, I'm not a computer expert. :C Overclocking the CPU to make it go faster is out of question for me cuz not only am I a noob, I don't want to shorten the lifespan of the CPU since I'm not exactly swiming in cash to make anual uppgrades and I only tend to replace a determinated component when it dies on me for good, like happened to my 8 year old pc, it was almost geral (motherboard, hardrive, PSU, back case fan, all dead.).
So the 3970X's base clock of 3.5 GHz right from the start would be nice, since the next uppgrade will only happen after 7 years if not a few more. Besides knowing that an amazing CPU as the 3930K has the same base clock of 3.2GHz, as my CPU from 8 years ago, it's just...not very inviting...if not to say a bit lame. :sweat: 
So I don't really know what to pick. :/ 

Indeed 3980X is either scrapped or delayed...but with future Ivy-E having 8 cores and 10 cores version (under the XEON name), a Sandy Bridge with 8 cores doesn't make much sense...unless Intel is testing the 8cores technology on an older CPU like Sandy to make sure Ivy will be flawless? :/ 
Score
0
a c 103 à CPUs
June 2, 2013 4:36:25 PM

inzone said:
Intel is apparently falling behind in their E model processor releases. The Sandy Bridge-E has been out for some time now and the rumored last model to that line has yet to be released (3980x). Meanwhile Ivy Bridge has been out for over a year and now Haswell has just been released at this point it would not surprise me if things were to be skipped or abandoned altogether.
I have the Sandy Bridge-E and can tell you that it uses the LGA 2011 socket and the IB-E and HW-E will also use that socket. The benefit of the E processor is the added lanes of bandwith for the Pci-e slots and support for Pci-e 3.0. Your normal processor, SB , IB and HASWELL all have 16 lanes of bandwidth for the MB's Pci-e slots and unless you get a MB with an added chipset to increase those lanes you will have to run two cards at x8. The 40 lanes of bandwidth that comes with the E processor allow for two video cards to have the full x16 lanes of Pci-e bandwidth.


This is not surprising. Intel has released server parts well after desktop parts for many, many years and the enthusiast "-E" parts are essentially Xeon DPs with a few differences in tuning and feature sets. 4+ socket in particular has been a joke with Intel as the Xeon MPs have increasingly lagged behind desktop parts ever since roughly the Xeons first came out. They are still using Westmere parts for the 4+ socket Xeon E7 line for crying out loud. Even Xeon DPs are lagging quite a bit now with the E5 Xeons only being Sandy Bridge parts. Xeon DPs didn't use to lag behind desktop quite that much, they typically at least were on the same generation as desktop by the time a new desktop arch was released.

My guess as to why this is the case is because Intel doesn't feel particularly pressured to do anything but a very slow roll-out of DP+ server parts. Everything is "the cloud" and "micro-servers," which means things like Atom SoCs and low-TDP "desktop socket"E3 Xeons, not high-powered LGA2011 stuff. The DP workstation market has more or less evaporated as quad-core and better CPUs have come onto the market. AMD is doing okay in the server market but they aren't lighting a big fire under Intel's butt that would make Intel take notice and modernize their outdated DP+ server chips. Enthusiast desktop parts are generally based off server parts and the enthusiast desktop market is small and continues to shrink, so no impetus for Intel to more rapidly bring the LGA2011 interface chips up to current arch either.

I would hazard a guess that IB-E would use LGA2011 since it essentially is a die shrink of SB-E. Haswell might take a new socket as the mainstream desktop SB and IB parts shared socket 1155 but Haswell needed a new one in LGA1150.
Score
0
a c 219 à CPUs
a c 130 å Intel
June 2, 2013 10:18:51 PM

Isa Santos, while I can understand your inexperience in overclocking as being a drawback to your choice of CPU I will have to say that this CPU (3930k) is so easy to overclock it's a matter of selecting a bios setting and your at 4.2ghz.
The Asus board that I have has several presets that will give you different overclocks and it's just one click and it's done. The presets are built in and tested with no ill effects towards the life of the CPU. What really shortens the life of the CPU is the added voltage and as long as it stays below 1.38v there are no life shortening effects on the CPU. So it's $500 for the difference between 3.2ghz and 3.5ghz , for me it wasn't worth it and I usually go for the top model of any component regardless of price but this made me stop and think.

Mu_Engineer I totally agree with what you say about Intel not being pushed and we can see the affects of that with their measly performance increases and tossing us scraps here and there. AMD is no longer able to offer any competition and has basicly thrown in the towel on the high end performance side. This is what happens with no competition, unlike 10 to 12 years ago when AMD had their chance and they actually were making Intel pay attention, but they blew it.
Score
0
!