Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

~600 AMD Build - Assistance + Opinions

Last response: in Systems
Share
October 17, 2012 12:17:22 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: The second I have a perfect build for my budget

Budget Range: ~600 USD.

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, Gaming, Gaming.

Are you buying a monitor: No, I have a great Dell Monitor.



Parts to Upgrade: Built from the ground up!

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg preferred, but open to any site.

Location: Ohio, USA

Parts Preferences: ATI/AMD.

Overclocking: Possibly. Hopefully.

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: Games - Dishonored, Skyrim, Borderlands 2, Crysis 2 + 3 when released, upcoming games on Medium to High settings

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: Because my computer has been outdated since before I even purchased it. I original bought an off the shelf eMachine (Yes, please laugh.) and it was never a gaming rig. Ever. I put a 256mb ATI into it to run TF2, HL2, etc. Older games for enjoyment. But it's become a hassle dealing with my older system and I'd like something to completely blow it out of the water.

I don't want a flashy computer. I really do not. I love basic cases. I'd love a basic case, white/black with great cooling and expansion.

The build I have thought up, with the low budget I have, is as follows.
Granted, I also went on a few websites for requirements on games and what not. The main site being Game-Debate.com

MSI 970A-G46 AM3+ AMD 970 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX AMD Motherboard with UEFI BIOS - $79.99

AMD FX-4170 Zambezi 4.2GHz (4.3GHz Turbo) Quad Core - $119.99
or
AMD FX-8150 Zambezi 3.6GHz Socket AM3+ 125W Eight-Core Desktop Processor - $189.99

ASUS HD7770-2GD5 Radeon HD 7770 GHz Edition 2GB 128-bit GDDR5 - $159.99

APEVIA ATX-CB700W 700W ATX12V / EPS12V SLI Ready CrossFire Ready Power Supply - OEM - $39.99

G.SKILL Ripjaws X Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866 - $87.99

Total for build (Quad Core) - 487.95 USD
Total for build (Octo Core) - 557.95 USD

This is just the basic outline I've whipped up. I'm in desperate want of suggestions, adding pieces such as a case, SSD for boot, and HDD for memory, cooling, etc.
October 17, 2012 6:58:59 PM

Apevia power supplies are complete junk, you would be wise to avoid them at all costs. And I think I would actually go with a 5800K over an FX-4170 or FX-8150. Even with the onboard video disabled on the A10, it's really an excellent CPU and capable of competing with the i3-2120 and i3-3220.

Maybe try something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD A10-5800K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($129.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($35.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock FM2A75 Pro4 ATX FM2 Motherboard ($86.97 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7770 1GB Video Card ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Antec One ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 500W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $604.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
October 17, 2012 8:07:25 PM

I was messing around with PCPartPicker and came up with this build to replace the one I had originally thought of.

Mind giving me opinion on this one? I have a harddrive I found laying around that's good enough for me. Relatively new. Friend never decided to use it and said I could have it. Big enough for what I need, 7200 RPM.

I'm honestly going to use my old optical drive from my old PC to install my copy of Win7 Home Edition, which I also found. It's great living with a guy who works at a computer store.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD FX-6200 3.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($124.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U12P SE2 54.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($39.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: MSI 970A-G46 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($78.89 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($43.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 6750 1GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($99.98 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 6750 1GB Video Card (CrossFire) ($99.98 @ NCIX US)
Case: Apex SK-393-C ATX Mid Tower Case ($24.15 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: CoolMax 500W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $531.96
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
Related resources
October 17, 2012 8:20:14 PM

The case and PSU on that build are complete junk (Coolmax PSUs are some of the industry's absolute worst). Even the onboard video on the A10 will beat two 6750's, don't expect those to get any sort of decent frame rates. :lol: 

If you've got a hard drive - take the build I posted, subtract the hard drive, and upgrade the GPU to a Radeon 7850. Disable the onboard video and you're set.
October 17, 2012 8:32:17 PM

g-unit1111 said:
...and upgrade the GPU to a Radeon 7850. Disable the onboard video and you're set.


Which 7850 would you recommend? I'm really, really new at this, if you can't tell. :ange: 
October 17, 2012 9:20:09 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Kingston XMP Blu Red Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Apex SK-393-C ATX Mid Tower Case ($24.15 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Essential 700W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($72.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $571.60
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I'd have to say the FX series are crap when it comes to games, you'll get better results buying the CPU listed and overclocking it. It also leaves you enough financial freedom to get yourself an HD 7950 or something else you might like.

The motherboard and chipset choices means that you'll have mobo support for subsequent generations of AMD CPUs to upgrade to which(hopefully)will supply much needed performance gains over a Phenom II.

If you decide to cheap out on the case and have money to burn. I'd personally get a PSU with a slightly higher wattage rating so you can OC both the HD 7950 and Phenom II to their max potential or get a Hyper 212 aircooler for the CPU.

And honestly I'd really suggest having your computer overclocked, the gains are basically free(if you don't mess up :D ).

EDIT: edited to weed out errors.
October 17, 2012 9:37:12 PM

g-unit1111 said:
The case and PSU on that build are complete junk (Coolmax PSUs are some of the industry's absolute worst). Even the onboard video on the A10 will beat two 6750's, don't expect those to get any sort of decent frame rates. :lol: 

If you've got a hard drive - take the build I posted, subtract the hard drive, and upgrade the GPU to a Radeon 7850. Disable the onboard video and you're set.


A single 6750 will beat the A10's IGP by a large margin. Two of them in Cf would perform around the Radeon 6870 or the 6950. You don't really think that the A10's Radeon 7660D can beat two 6750s, do you? It'd need to be about as fast as the 6970, aka approximately equal to Radeon 6770 CF and the Radeon 7850 to do that.
October 17, 2012 9:38:17 PM

division_9 said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: AMD Phenom II X4 965 Black 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($89.99 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock 970 Extreme3 ATX AM3+ Motherboard ($74.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Kingston XMP Blu Red Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Apex SK-393-C ATX Mid Tower Case ($24.15 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Silverstone Strider Essential 700W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($72.49 @ Amazon)
Total: $571.60
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

I'd have to say the FX series are crap when it comes to games, you'll get better results buying the CPU listed and overclocking it. It also leaves you enough financial freedom to get yourself an HD 7950 or something else you might like.

The motherboard and chipset choices means that you'll have mobo support for subsequent generations of AMD CPUs to upgrade to which(hopefully)will supply much needed performance gains over a Phenom II.

If you decide to cheap out on the case and have money to burn. I'd personally get a PSU with a slightly higher wattage rating so you can OC both the HD 7950 and Phenom II to their max potential or get a Hyper 212 aircooler for the CPU.

And honestly I'd really suggest having your computer overclocked, the gains are basically free(if you don't mess up :D ).

EDIT: edited to weed out errors.


Not bad but that case is a complete POS, and that PSU is a bit overkill for a single GPU solution. there's better ones you could get for less than $50, like even the Cooler Master Elite 430.

Quote:
A single 6750 will beat the A10's IGP by a large margin. Two of them in Cf would perform around the Radeon 6870 or the 6950. You don't really think that the A10's Radeon 7660D can beat two 6750s, do you? It'd need to be about as fast as the 6970, aka approximately equal to Radeon 6770 CF and the Radeon 7850 to do that.


Well I wouldn't make a claim that ridiculous but the 6750 is not a card I would purchase.
October 17, 2012 9:45:42 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/kCaK



At this price point for gaming the best choice is the 965 BE you are also gonna need a cpu cooler to overclock it, hyper 212 evo.


7950, and a better case.


$598.19 after rebates.
October 17, 2012 10:20:57 PM

maxalge said:
http://pcpartpicker.com/p/kCaK



At this price point for gaming the best choice is the 965 BE you are also gonna need a cpu cooler to overclock it, hyper 212 evo.


7950, and a better case.


$598.19 after rebates.


I'd personally go for an Elite 430 ($3 difference) or a HAF 912 ($12 difference). The biggest question I have though is whether or not the 7950 would be bottlenecked by the 965 or not.
October 17, 2012 10:29:30 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Not bad but that case is a complete POS, and that PSU is a bit overkill for a single GPU solution. there's better ones you could get for less than $50, like even the Cooler Master Elite 430.

Quote:
A single 6750 will beat the A10's IGP by a large margin. Two of them in Cf would perform around the Radeon 6870 or the 6950. You don't really think that the A10's Radeon 7660D can beat two 6750s, do you? It'd need to be about as fast as the 6970, aka approximately equal to Radeon 6770 CF and the Radeon 7850 to do that.


Well I wouldn't make a claim that ridiculous but the 6750 is not a card I would purchase.


My claims are perfectly accurate. I agree that 6750s and especially 6750 CF is not ideal, but it's far superior to the 7660D no matter what memory you have.
October 17, 2012 11:50:57 PM

blazorthon said:
My claims are perfectly accurate. I agree that 6750s and especially 6750 CF is not ideal, but it's far superior to the 7660D no matter what memory you have.


Oh I must have had it confused with the 6470 - that's the card I originally got for my HTPC and that thing is a POS.

Can you show me the benchmarks on this one if there are any?
October 18, 2012 12:08:25 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Oh I must have had it confused with the 6470 - that's the card I originally got for my HTPC and that thing is a POS.

Can you show me the benchmarks on this one if there are any?


Hold on (6450 or 6470, yeah, two of those would be beaten by the 7660D so long as it's paired with DDR3-1333 9-9-9-24 memory or better), I'll get my links. 6770CF is easier to find than 6750 CF reviews (6770 CF is usually around a 6970 or 7850 in performance), but I'm sure that I'll find something for you.
October 18, 2012 3:20:33 AM

g-unit1111 said:
I'd personally go for an Elite 430 ($3 difference) or a HAF 912 ($12 difference). The biggest question I have though is whether or not the 7950 would be bottlenecked by the 965 or not.




It would, not too horrible if he overclocks the 965 to ~4ghz.

That's the best he gets with amd cpu sadly.


Good catch on the 430.



Another option would be a 4 core intel + 7870. Which would be a more balanced setup. But I dunno what the OP's reaction would be to switching to an intel setup.
October 19, 2012 3:53:10 PM

maxalge said:
Another option would be a 4 core intel + 7870. Which would be a more balanced setup. But I dunno what the OP's reaction would be to switching to an intel setup.


I wouldn't mind switching to an Intel setup. Quite honestly, I'd prefer Intel over AMD. I've heard that AMD is slacking off with their CPUs lately, but that was just something someone said.

I'd prefer the power of an intel over an AMD, but Intel is generally far too expensive. I could hold off and build an intel based system with nVidia GFX if I wait.

Mind giving me a decent nVidia + Intel build for say 800? If I put it off another month that's more than enough time to get 200.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: EVGA 130-SB-E685-KR ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti 1GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti 1GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 210 ATX Mid Tower Case ($43.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec Basiq Plus 550W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $633.92
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Gave it a shot to see if it was a good/decent enough build. Discuss?
October 22, 2012 2:17:35 PM

The i5-2500K is greatly superior to all AMD CPUs for gaming at stock in most games and mostly also for overclocking (The eight-core FX CPUs can be worked with to have comparable gaming performance with core configuration altering and CPU/NB frequency overclocking).

AMD or Intel CPU, I would not recommend two GTX 550 Ti cards unless you really want an SLI setup. You might notice micro-stutter with such lower end Fermi cards and much higher power consumption than a current-generation card of similar performance.

I wouldn't use an Intel CPU in a $600 gaming build, but an $800 build has enough budget leeway for the higher prices of the i5s.
October 22, 2012 4:12:17 PM

so many different build here.
am sure the OP would be quite confused.
OP your original build is quite good. the one with the fx-4170.
but a few changes i would advice in that build. here goes.
change the hd7770 to hd7850. please do that. it makes a huge difference at 1080p.
just dont get anything more expensive than 7850.
next up the the psu. please dont go for that psu. i suggest the corsair cx430 or vs450.
next the ram. no need for 16gb ram in gaming
its useless. 8gb is more than you will need.

and please dont go for A10. it might not be good option at 1080p.
as for your alternative pc partpicker list
yup the fx-6200 is pretty good at that price
so get either fx-4170 or fx-6200.
please dont do the 6750 crossfire. bad bad bad idea.
a single 7850 will easily beat two 6750.
also get a decent budget coolermaster or antec case not that one you listed. also not that psu.
get the one i recommended.
there you go... hope you didnt get too confused.
October 22, 2012 4:28:11 PM

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/l4FU

With a great 128GB Vertex 4 SSD and including MIR, this build with a GTX 660, i5-3570K, DDR3-1600 9-9-9-24 2x4GB memory kit, and a good ASRock Extreme 3 motherboard was able to pull in just under $799. Other components include a cheap LG DVD/CD burner, a Corsair CX430 PSU, a Zalman CNPS10X OPTIMA CPU Cooler (I could be wrong, but I'm pretty sure that it's better than the CM Hyper 212 Evo despite being cheaper than the CM Hyper 212 Evo), and a cheap Apex Vortex 3620 ATX mid-tower case.

With no SSD, you can focus more on the base components (better case, better power supply, better motherboard, etc.) and/or on better gaming performance (better graphics card, better CPU-cooler, etc.) or simply keep everything else more or less the same and save some money. A cheaper motherboard could also be used to put more money elsewhere, but otherwise, I wouldn't recommend going cheaper on any of the components in this build except maybe the CPU.


However, OP, this would be assuming that prices stay the same over the next month if you go the save and have $800 budget route and some new components will probably have launched then, so if you plan on waiting for a higher budget, we shouldn't give concrete recommendations at this time.

Also, if you'd rather go the $600 right now route, an Intel/Nvidia build simply isn't optimal IMO. Intel and Nvidia both have a transitional gap right at that spot between their higher end and lower end parts where you're much better off either dropping budget a little or increasing it a little to get a much better bang for your buck without making sacrifices. AMD has no such problem for both CPUs and graphics right there and is simply easier to work with at the $600 price point.
October 22, 2012 4:35:03 PM

mohit9206 said:
so many different build here.
am sure the OP would be quite confused.
OP your original build is quite good. the one with the fx-4170.
but a few changes i would advice in that build. here goes.
change the hd7770 to hd7850. please do that. it makes a huge difference at 1080p.
just dont get anything more expensive than 7850.
next up the the psu. please dont go for that psu. i suggest the corsair cx430 or vs450.
next the ram. no need for 16gb ram in gaming
its useless. 8gb is more than you will need.

and please dont go for A10. it might not be good option at 1080p.
as for your alternative pc partpicker list
yup the fx-6200 is pretty good at that price
so get either fx-4170 or fx-6200.
please dont do the 6750 crossfire. bad bad bad idea.
a single 7850 will easily beat two 6750.
also get a decent budget coolermaster or antec case not that one you listed. also not that psu.
get the one i recommended.
there you go... hope you didnt get too confused.


When you don't use the IGP, the A10-5800K is on-par with the FX-4170 in average gaming performance while being able to use significantly less power according to Tech Powerup. It's IGP is lacking, but you don't need to use its IGP. Not using its IGP gives more overclocking headroom anyway.
October 22, 2012 4:51:54 PM

Sentient232 said:
I wouldn't mind switching to an Intel setup. Quite honestly, I'd prefer Intel over AMD. I've heard that AMD is slacking off with their CPUs lately, but that was just something someone said.

I'd prefer the power of an intel over an AMD, but Intel is generally far too expensive. I could hold off and build an intel based system with nVidia GFX if I wait.

Mind giving me a decent nVidia + Intel build for say 800? If I put it off another month that's more than enough time to get 200.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ SuperBiiz)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus 76.8 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: EVGA 130-SB-E685-KR ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($44.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti 1GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 550 Ti 1GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 210 ATX Mid Tower Case ($43.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Antec Basiq Plus 550W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V Power Supply ($54.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $633.92
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Gave it a shot to see if it was a good/decent enough build. Discuss?


Dual 550TI is a horrible GPU setup - you're better off with a single 7850. The 2500K is a good CPU, but EVGA motherboards aren't. Better would be to get a 3470 and H77 - that will run around the same price.

Quote:
When you don't use the IGP, the A10-5800K is on-par with the FX-4170 in average gaming performance while being able to use significantly less power according to Tech Powerup. It's IGP is lacking, but you don't need to use its IGP. Not using its IGP gives more overclocking headroom anyway.


Yes!!! I would far rather get a 5800K over the 965BE.
October 22, 2012 5:03:07 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Dual 550TI is a horrible GPU setup - you're better off with a single 7850. The 2500K is a good CPU, but EVGA motherboards aren't. Better would be to get a 3470 and H77 - that will run around the same price.

Quote:
When you don't use the IGP, the A10-5800K is on-par with the FX-4170 in average gaming performance while being able to use significantly less power according to Tech Powerup. It's IGP is lacking, but you don't need to use its IGP. Not using its IGP gives more overclocking headroom anyway.


Yes!!! I would far rather get a 5800K over the 965BE.


Ironically, the A10-5800K, an APU, is one of AMD's best gaming CPUs :lol: 

I'd take it over any CPU, AMD and Intel, in its budget range.
October 22, 2012 6:04:18 PM

blazorthon said:
Ironically, the A10-5800K, an APU, is one of AMD's best gaming CPUs :lol: 

I'd take it over any CPU, AMD and Intel, in its budget range.

how come its the best ?
October 22, 2012 6:26:47 PM

mohit9206 said:
how come its the best ?


I said that it's one of the best, not the best. It is one of the best because it performs only a little under 3% slower than the FX-4170 on average (averaged across a variety of games) despite very similar pricing and lower power consumption. The A10-5800K also overclocks better than the FX-4170 while being more power efficient. That's kinda a big deal for the A10-5800K because it's also similarly priced to the FX-4170, less demanding for the cooler, motherboard, and PSU than the FX-4170, and the IGP just might come in handy some day.

As a CPU alone, the FX-81xx CPUs can be made superior to the A10-5800K through overclocking the CPU/NB frequency (this controls, among other things, the L3 cache frequency) and core configuration altering (disabling one core of each module to let the primary core of each module have the entire front end of its module to itself or editing the P states of one core of each module and prioritizing to have a similar effect without sacrificing as much highly threaded performance, if any at all; the latter takes more time and effort to implement). However, they are also more expensive than the A10-5800K.
!