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How does one Install a program file on "D" drive with Windows 7 64-bit

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January 23, 2010 5:43:05 PM

How does one install a new program (Windows 7 64-bit) on the D drive????? Dell formatted the hard drive with a C and D partition, though by default everything goes to C. C is almost full, and D drive is in fact the larger of the two partitions. How does one install new programs to the D drive so as to not have C fill up?? I have Windows 7 64-bit, so doe I need two program folders on the D drive?? That is, one called "Program Files" and the other called "Programs Files (x86)"??? How do I make those folders on D?? On C Drive the folders in which programs are installed have SPECIAL permissions!!! Dell tech support will not answer this even though Dell sold me the laptop with two partitions of the hard drive. NO clue why Dell does that. Under Windows 7, the D drive is not labelled a Recovery Drive, and it is a bigger partition than the C Drive. This is lunacy!!!!!!!
January 23, 2010 6:18:01 PM

Most progams allow you to select where to install.
Usually you select "custom" during the install and then select the
drive/directory to install to.
You didn't mention the size of the C drive, but I would recommend cleaning it up. If you have data files there, move them to the D drive, making sure to change any pointers in programs that use the data.
You might also uninstall unused programs to clear up space on the C.
If possible, it's usually better to accept the default install location, the C.
Win 7 64 bit installs 32 bit apps to the X86 program file directory.
Most apps are still 32-bit.
Doesn't make a real difference in space. Just another directory to differentiate 32 and 64 bit apps.

--Vic
a b $ Windows 7
January 23, 2010 6:33:56 PM

Most programs have an option to select custom instalation which allows you to choose a different location from the default, but not all.
Even choosing a custom location some files will still need to be installed on C:
To make some space on C: uninstall any programs you don't use, Dell has no doubt loaded it up with stuff you never use.
How big are the partitions? it seems unusal to have a second partition larger then C:, usually the D: partition is a recovery partition of about 10GB.
You say it's not labelled as a recovery drive, but does it contain recovery files? or do you have a set of recovery disks.
If you don't have recovery disks, I strongly suggest you make a set before messing with this system. There should be information with your system as to how to create a backup set, if not go to the Dell site.
Related resources
January 24, 2010 8:13:54 PM

fairship said:
How does one install a new program (Windows 7 64-bit) on the D drive????? Dell formatted the hard drive with a C and D partition, though by default everything goes to C. C is almost full, and D drive is in fact the larger of the two partitions. How does one install new programs to the D drive so as to not have C fill up?? I have Windows 7 64-bit, so doe I need two program folders on the D drive?? That is, one called "Program Files" and the other called "Programs Files (x86)"??? How do I make those folders on D?? On C Drive the folders in which programs are installed have SPECIAL permissions!!! Dell tech support will not answer this even though Dell sold me the laptop with two partitions of the hard drive. NO clue why Dell does that. Under Windows 7, the D drive is not labelled a Recovery Drive, and it is a bigger partition than the C Drive. This is lunacy!!!!!!!


I have the same problem here. I called back the technician and asked him why the C drive has been partinioned. Both C & D have the same capacity. So his answer was that the D was for the data but I'm still wondering which data he is talking about . . . There is a folder appearing in the D drive entitled Works. If I load pictures they simply go in the Pictures folder that is located under the C, and it is the same if I used Microsoft Word or any other programs. They simply go in the C :(  . . . by default.

There is another point he mentioned to me. If the computer crashed it will be easier for them to see where the problem is. But still not sure of it too.

Anyway, I haven't downloaded many files yet because I simply don't understand :) . They are still on my XP.

This week I intend to go back to the store with the computer. Sometimes I just feel to put it for sale. I'm disappointed of Windows 7 and I seriously look to buy a Mac.

I bought my new computer December 5, 2009 (Windows 7 - 64).

Excuse me for my bad English I'm of French language.
a b $ Windows 7
January 24, 2010 10:09:49 PM

You could also use Win7's Disk Management tool to shrink D and expand C into the resulting space. Sometimes this will not work, in which case you can use something like GParted.
February 6, 2010 2:50:55 AM

Hi:

There is no reason except perhaps the permissions for access to that partition have been set to prevent a write. This could be just an issue with Windows.

Usually the D partition is a recovery partition and you should not write to it.
If you do even the tiniest of files will make the drive appear as full.
You could try Easeus partition manager to expand the C drive partition to one big drive if D is not the image drive. Do back everything up of course!


But right click on the drive and see what the properties is set at. If it is read only that is the issue. Again Dell makes the partition for the image and it may have been deleted and the drive is set for Read only...
May 20, 2010 10:59:42 AM

Le problème est DELL pas Windows 7. Pardon my French. Really your English is very good.

Dell has been partitioning their hard drives into C small (25%) and big (75%) partitions for no good reason!
It is a deplorable practice by DELL, absolutely terrible that they are dicing up Hard Drives with partitions. They make otherwise good computers bad with partitioning of this sort.

Dell's support staff when asked about this has not, up to this date given any logical or viable reason for this mess. It has nothing to do with any of the inadequate bullshit that Dell support speaks about storing data on the separate drive.

Mon ami, Il ya deux solutions. Les deux très techincal.

1) Using the Windows 7 disk (if Dell supplied one), wipe the whole hard drive and let Windows7, not Dell set up the new single drive partition. You should only do this if you are connected by wire...Ethernet to a fast internet connection so that you can get needed drivers during set up. If you have any valuable data on the drive, back it up first. This procedure will erase everything, including MS Office, and all the Dell crapware.

2) If you are familiar with Ubuntu Linux, you could boot from an Ubuntu CD and use GParted to remove the logical D drive and it's extended partition, then extend the C drive partition to the remainder of the drive's available space. Once the partition is changed and you reboot without the Ubuntu disk, then allow window to fix the disk's index at restart. Note if you have more than 3GB RAM you should use an Ubuntu-64bit CD.

I have fixed this issue for my clients (upstate NY USA) using both the above techniques, and I have to emphasize the importance of saving any data you need to another drive, backup, before you begin.

Where are you located, France? Quebec?
May 20, 2010 9:13:55 PM

Hello fairship,

It depends on the version of Windows 7 that you have. As a good rule of thumb a minimum of 30GB is recommended for Windows 7 *(possibly more for Windows Ultimate).
http://tinyurl.com/obma6q
 
If you want to run Windows 7 on your PC, here's what it requires:
1 gigahertz (GHz) or faster 32-bit (x86) or 64-bit (x64) processor
1 gigabyte (GB) RAM (32-bit) or 2 GB RAM (64-bit)
16 GB available hard disk space (32-bit) or 20 GB (64-bit)
DirectX 9 graphics device with WDDM 1.0 or higher driver
Some Additioinal information with regard to the "system reserved" Partition in Windows 7 setup:
If you do not want the 'System Reserved' partition to be created and existed, the best way is to stop Windows 7 installation process to create the partition when installing Windows 7.
In Windows 7, the feature (100 MB partition to store WinRE files) is installed on all computers if the OS is installed on hard disk with single partition scheme, or unallocated space (space which not yet been partitioned) on the hard disk drive.
Thus in order to skip or avoid the 100M partition to be automatically created during installation, here’s a few rules to follow when choosing where to install Windows 7 to:
1. Do not install Windows 7 to a hard disk that not yet been partitioned or to unallocated space (When install Windows 7 to unallocated space, no warning pop-up or confirmation is asked, and setup will straight away and directly create partition 200 MB of disk space as special partition without notification).
2. If possible, try to create all the necessary partition(s) and format the partition(s) before attempting to install Windows 7.
3. If you’re installing Windows 7 into a new hard disk, or a blank hard disk with no partition defined yet, or if you must delete all existing partitions to start afresh, chose Drive options (advanced). Delete (if applicable) unwanted partitions. Then, click New to create the single partition or multiple partitions according to your own preference.
When prompted with dialog box saying "To ensure that all Windows features work correctly, Windows might create additional partitions for system files", click on Cancel button. Optionally, to be double confirm, Format the partition before selecting it to install Windows 7
Finally, if you want to do some research; there are also some great articles, instructional videos and such to help with your Windows 7, installation, migration and upgrade decisions located at our Springboard site:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/default.aspx
Thanks again and good luck!
John M.
Microsoft Windows Client Support
a b $ Windows 7
May 20, 2010 9:46:13 PM

@ John: I'll add a couple of notes.
1) The "System Reserved" WinRE partition is sometimes 100MB instead of 200MB. (It's 100MB on my Win7 Home Premium x64 desktop; I honestly don't remember what it is on my notebook, and I don't want to start it up now just to find out! :D  )
2) IIRC, the Win7 System Repair Disk that can be created offers the same functionality as the WinRE partition. What I don't know is whether you can create a System Repair Disk if you don't have the WinRE partition. Do you know?
!