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Non-gaming machine that's lightning fast and very reliable.

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October 21, 2012 6:32:28 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: within a month

Budget Range: 1,000 - 1,500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: surfing, email, website design, (Using dual monitors, and maybe adding a third)

Are you buying a monitor: No

Do you need to buy OS: No (using Ubuntu 12.10)

Preferred Website for Parts: newegg.com

Location: Raleigh, NC, USA

Parts Preferences: none

Overclocking: No

SLI or Crossfire: No

Your Monitor Resolutions: 1920x1080; 1680x1050

--First build (other than a barebones kit). Want to learn how computers work, and learn by building. Want a machine that will not need upgrading for about three years. Main concerns are compatibility of components and relaibility of the whole computer. Am asking for expert advice and commentary on the parts I've initially selected (below). I (think I) realize that the cpu, memory and board may be overkill, but but don't care about that.

Thanks very much!

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 512GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($399.99 @ Microcenter)
Case: Antec Three Hundred Two ATX Mid Tower Case ($54.98 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: Raidmax 500W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($44.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS424-98 DVD/CD Writer ($23.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS424-98 DVD/CD Writer ($23.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Total: $1167.91
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
October 21, 2012 7:11:28 PM

That's a good start but Raidmax PSUs are among the industry's absolute worst. Stay very far away from them. For your use I wouldn't run multiple monitors off the onboard video - get a dedicated GPU, even a low end one like the Radeon 7770 will get the job done. And I would not pay that much for an SSD, even a Vertex 4.
You also don't need that strong of a motherboard if you're not going to overclock or run a massive storage setup.

Try something like this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($142.86 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($38.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F4 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($129.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Plextor M5S Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7770 1GB Video Card ($126.97 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic S12II 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($22.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1151.74
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Switched out the storage configuration and included a better case and a far far better PSU (really, avoid Raidmax like the plague).
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October 21, 2012 7:17:43 PM

great job G-unit, he has everything covered!
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October 21, 2012 7:30:20 PM

Quote:
g-unit makes some nice adjustments but you can go ahead and order this puppy up ;D

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/kZjj
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/kZjj/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/kZjj/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($299.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($194.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: HIS Radeon HD 7750 1GB Video Card ($94.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($84.99 @ NCIX US)
Power Supply: OCZ ModXStream Pro 600W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($38.91 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS424-98 DVD/CD Writer ($23.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Optical Drive: LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray/DVD/CD Writer ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1072.82


What's the 16GB of RAM for? Most of the OPs' needs don't go beyond 2 - 3GB at the most.
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October 21, 2012 8:16:10 PM

That's a kick-ass system.
I have no idea if you'd actually need all that CPU power or especially that amount of RAM for your listed usage, but whatever.

You may wish to add a slightly better CPU HSF.
http://us.ncix.com/products/?sku=41337&vpn=RR-B10-212P-...

SSD:
I recommend the Samsung 840 256GB drive instead. That should be plenty of space, and it's probably a more RELIABLE drive (update the firmware if needed). Take the extra money and get a WD GREEN 2TB hard drive and use WD's free Acronis True Image software to make IMAGE BACKUPS of your SSD, and for extra storage etc.

*The most important thing you can do is periodically backup your SSD to a hard drive. If your SSD dies otherwise everything is simply GONE.
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October 21, 2012 9:53:51 PM

photonboy said:
That's a kick-ass system.
I have no idea if you'd actually need all that CPU power or especially that amount of RAM for your listed usage, but whatever.

You may wish to add a slightly better CPU HSF.
http://us.ncix.com/products/?sku=41337&vpn=RR-B10-212P-...

SSD:
I recommend the Samsung 840 256GB drive instead. That should be plenty of space, and it's probably a more RELIABLE drive (update the firmware if needed). Take the extra money and get a WD GREEN 2TB hard drive and use WD's free Acronis True Image software to make IMAGE BACKUPS of your SSD, and for extra storage etc.

*The most important thing you can do is periodically backup your SSD to a hard drive. If your SSD dies otherwise everything is simply GONE.


The Hyper 212 Evo has a stronger fan than the 212+ and includes better thermal compound.
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October 21, 2012 11:38:23 PM

REALLY appreciate the expertise!

Will get a better power supply.

Q. 1: If I get a separate GPU, will I be wasting money on the CPU with integrated graphics?

Q. 2: Does Intel make the same CPU WITHOUT integrated graphics?

Q. 3: Is it difficult, using Ubuntu, to configure/set up/install two hard drives, one SSD and one HDD?

Q. 4: What capabilities do I lose by getting the cheaper motherboard?

Thanks very much.

~George
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October 22, 2012 5:13:15 AM

geomcd said:
REALLY appreciate the expertise!

Will get a better power supply.

Q. 1: If I get a separate GPU, will I be wasting money on the CPU with integrated graphics?

Q. 2: Does Intel make the same CPU WITHOUT integrated graphics?

Q. 3: Is it difficult, using Ubuntu, to configure/set up/install two hard drives, one SSD and one HDD?

Q. 4: What capabilities do I lose by getting the cheaper motherboard?

Thanks very much.

~George


1. The integrated graphics are actually meant to be a diagnostic tool to help diagnose GPU problems. You don't want to forfeit that option. AMD makes a CPU - the A10-5800K that actually has a pretty decent integrated GPU in it.

2. See #1.

3. I don't know - I don't really use Ubuntu. Someone else will have to help you there.

4. Just the ability to overclock, maybe a few expandability options, that's about it.
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