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Newegg and CyberPowerPC came out to be the same...

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October 28, 2012 12:53:38 PM

Before you begin reading: I posted this thread on the homebuilt section too because I wasn't sure as which section exactly to post it in.

Hey guys! Well I was going to just go ahead and order a custom build computer from CyberPC, but than I thought, "What if I could build my own computer, and save some money!" Well... I searched Newegg and what I saw was really disappointing. The difference was only a mere $80...

Here's the CyberPowerPC Rig:


Case: * Azza Hurrican 2000 Full Tower Gaming Case with 4 Hot Swappable HDD Cage & (4) 230MM Fans

Extra Case Fan Upgrade: Maximum 120MM Case Cooling Fans for your selected case

CPU: Intel® Core™ i5-3570K 3.40 GHz 6MB Intel Smart Cache LGA1155 (All Venom OC Certified)

Venom Boost Fast And Efficient Factory Overclocking: Extreme OC (Extreme Overclock 20% or more)
Cooling Fan: Asetek 510LC Liquid Cooling System 120MM Radiator & Fan (Enhanced Cooling Performance + Extreme Silent at 20dBA) (Dual Standard 120MM Fans (Push-Pull))

Motherboard: [CrossFireX/SLI] ASRock Z77 Extreme4 Intel Z77 Chipset DDR3 ATX Mainboard w/ IRST, Lucid Virtu MVP, XFast Technologies, 7.1 HD Audio, GbLAN, 3x PCIe x16 (2 Gen3, 1 Gen2), 2x PCIe x1 & 2 PCI (All Venom OC Certified)

Memory: 8GB (4GBx2) DDR3/1866MHz Dual Channel Memory (Corsair XMS)
Video Card: AMD Radeon HD 7970 3GB 16X PCIe 3.0 Video Card (Major Brand Powered by AMD)

Power Supply Upgrade: * 850 Watts - Corsair CMPSU-850TXV2 80 Plus Power Supply - Quad SLI Ready
Hard Drive: 2TB (2TBx1) SATA-III 6.0Gb/s 64MB Cache 7200RPM HDD (Single Drive)

Optical Drive: 24X Double Layer Dual Format DVD+-R/+-RW + CD-R/RW Drive (BLACK COLOR)

LCD Monitor: 24" Widescreen 1920x1080 Sceptre E246W-1080P (23.6" Viewable)(Black Color) LED Backlight, Built-in Speaker, DVI, HDMI Input

Speakers: Creative Inspire T6160 5.1 Speakers System

Keyboard: AZZA Multimedia USB Gaming Keyboard

Mouse: AZZA Optical 1600dpi Gaming Mouse with Weight Adjustable Cartridge

Video Camera: Creative Live! Cam Socialize w/ Noise-Canceling Microphone

Operating System: None - FORMAT HARD DRIVE ONLY



This is the Newegg Rig:

ASUS DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS Black SATA 24X DVD Burner - Bulk - OEM

AZZA Hurrican 2000 CSAZ-2000 Black SECC Japanese Steel ATX Full Tower Computer Case

SAMSUNG Spinpoint F3 HD103SJ 1TB 7200 RPM SATA 3.0Gb/s 3.5" Internal Hard Drive -Bare Drive

Acer S231HLbid Black 23" 5ms HDMI LED-Backlight LCD monitor Slim Design

SAPPHIRE Vapor-X 100351VXSR Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready CrossFireX Support ...

CORSAIR HX Series HX750 750W ATX12V 2.3 / EPS12V 2.91 SLI Ready CrossFire Ready 80 PLUS GOLD Certified Modular Active PFC ...

Eagle Arion ET-AR306-BK 2.0 Compact Speaker - 50Hz to 18kHz, 50 Watts

Microsoft SIDEWINDER X4 Keyboard - Retail

ASRock Z77 Extreme4 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

Patriot Viper 3 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model PV38G160C9K

Intel Core i5-3570K Ivy Bridge 3.4GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 1155 77W Quad-Core Desktop Processor Intel HD Graphics 4000 BX80637I53570K



NOTE: The PSU is also better in the Cyberpowerpc, includes overclocking, care features. Overclocking is $50, the care features are $40 total... CypowerPC also has way better speakers, has a video-camera, and a mouse...

Did I mention... Free shipping...

So why exactly do people recommend to build your own computers... from what I've observed ordering them is way cheaper!

So basically my question is, is there a reason for me to go ahead and build it myself...?

Thanks!

More about : newegg cyberpowerpc

October 28, 2012 1:22:46 PM

legendaswd said:


So why exactly do people recommend to build your own computers... from what I've observed ordering them is way cheaper!

So basically my question is, is there a reason for me to go ahead and build it myself...?

Thanks!


As for the computer being built by CyberpowerPC, MAKE SURE that you are getting the full length warranty on each component, and not as a whole computer. The MOBO, for example has a 3 year warranty if purchased independently. The PSU I think is 5 years. Some places (not sure at all about CyberpowerPC) will only give you a system warranty of a pathetic 1-2 years, and not per-component. So if you decide to have them build it for you, double check into this.

As for building it yourself, and why, the main reason I know is that people enjoy doing things with their own hands. I love doing this, and I suspect many on these forums feel the same way. The other obvious thing is that people like to precisely control what goes into their computers and why, but since you have similar configurations either way, this likely doesn't apply to you. The doing it yourself thing has its own pros and cons, pros include the experience, practice and knowledge you accumulate as you deal with each system, and their problems, should there be any. The cons include, well, possible problems that you will have to sort out, including shipping back items and having some delays in the build process. So ultimately this is up to you. If you don't mind tinkering (or rather enjoy it), and are not frustrated easily, you should try building it yourself, especially if it is your first time or 2nd time, because it is rewarding. If you have done it a dozen or so times, and you can save your self some $$ doing it yourself, then you can build it yourself too.

Given that CyberpowerPC has way better speakers, etc, you should let them do it if you need the system soon and can't afford any down-time if a build runs into problems. Otherwise, and especially if you have some spare parts to test things out with (to make troubleshooting much easier), you should do your own build(s).
October 28, 2012 1:33:25 PM

Maxx_Power said:
As for the computer being built by CyberpowerPC, MAKE SURE that you are getting the full length warranty on each component, and not as a whole computer. The MOBO, for example has a 3 year warranty if purchased independently. The PSU I think is 5 years. Some places (not sure at all about CyberpowerPC) will only give you a system warranty of a pathetic 1-2 years, and not per-component. So if you decide to have them build it for you, double check into this.

As for building it yourself, and why, the main reason I know is that people enjoy doing things with their own hands. I love doing this, and I suspect many on these forums feel the same way. The other obvious thing is that people like to precisely control what goes into their computers and why, but since you have similar configurations either way, this likely doesn't apply to you. The doing it yourself thing has its own pros and cons, pros include the experience, practice and knowledge you accumulate as you deal with each system, and their problems, should there be any. The cons include, well, possible problems that you will have to sort out, including shipping back items and having some delays in the build process. So ultimately this is up to you. If you don't mind tinkering (or rather enjoy it), and are not frustrated easily, you should try building it yourself, especially if it is your first time or 2nd time, because it is rewarding. If you have done it a dozen or so times, and you can save your self some $$ doing it yourself, then you can build it yourself too.

Given that CyberpowerPC has way better speakers, etc, you should let them do it if you need the system soon and can't afford any down-time if a build runs into problems. Otherwise, and especially if you have some spare parts to test things out with (to make troubleshooting much easier), you should do your own build(s).


Thanks for your input man! I was really hoping that I could build it myself, but I don't really see a reason as to why I should take risks. I;m not in a hurry or anything, I'm just afraid to mess something up.
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October 28, 2012 3:12:17 PM

legendaswd said:
Thanks for your input man! I was really hoping that I could build it myself, but I don't really see a reason as to why I should take risks. I;m not in a hurry or anything, I'm just afraid to mess something up.


Okay! If you have some friends who are good with computer hardware/testing, you can always setup a guided build where they can help you out. If not, you can just have it built for you, and you can always peek inside and tinker with things as you get more comfortable.

October 28, 2012 3:25:01 PM

Enthusiasts build their own Rigs to optimize and personalize them, and because they love doing it. If you're just into using the system - rather than supporting it or maintaining it - purchasing a pre-built system like that can be just as cost-effective.
October 28, 2012 3:38:03 PM

Maxx_Power said:
Okay! If you have some friends who are good with computer hardware/testing, you can always setup a guided build where they can help you out. If not, you can just have it built for you, and you can always peek inside and tinker with things as you get more comfortable.


Yeah... I posted this a few hours ago... Now, however, I actually wanna build it haha!

How hard will it be? And is there a guide I can follow somewhere, or do the parts come with some easy step-by-step manual? Also, with the parts I listed, if put together correctly, it should work right, I mean, I'm not missing any parts right...?

And also, I made this thread about a few GPU choices, if you guys can help me out, I'd really appreciate it!:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/375586-33-which-7970

Thanks for the replies so far guys
October 28, 2012 3:48:13 PM

legendaswd said:
Yeah... I posted this a few hours ago... Now, however, I actually wanna build it haha!

How hard will it be? And is there a guide I can follow somewhere, or do the parts come with some easy step-by-step manual? Also, with the parts I listed, if put together correctly, it should work right, I mean, I'm not missing any parts right...?

And also, I made this thread about a few GPU choices, if you guys can help me out, I'd really appreciate it!:

http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/375586-33-which-7970

Thanks for the replies so far guys


These days, it is easy to build a PC, not like the old days. Here are some guides:

http://www.buildeasypc.com/

http://lifehacker.com/5828747/how-to-build-a-computer-from-scratch-the-complete-guide

Give them a read, and see if this is reasonable but not too challenging for you (you do need a good level of fine motor skills). You should already have all the tools necessary (screw driver...).

The software install part, BIOS settings to maximize performance of RAM/CPU/etc might be the time consuming part once you finish the hardware assembly.
October 28, 2012 3:50:45 PM

Maxx_Power said:
These days, it is easy to build a PC, not like the old days. Here are some guides:

http://www.buildeasypc.com/

http://lifehacker.com/5828747/how-to-build-a-computer-from-scratch-the-complete-guide

Give them a read, and see if this is reasonable but not too challenging for you (you do need a good level of fine motor skills). You should already have all the tools necessary (screw driver...).

The software install part, BIOS settings to maximize performance of RAM/CPU/etc might be the time consuming part once you finish the hardware assembly.


Thanksss! The only question I have left is: the parts required for a computer to work are all listed up there right...? There's no hidden cards that I need to know about?

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October 28, 2012 3:52:06 PM
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As for your GPU choices, anything 7970 Ghz edition that's cheap should be good. The cheapest 7970's on Newegg as you linked to are not Ghz editions, and thus are a bit cheaper.

It sounds like you'll have a lot of airflow in the case with your 230mm fans in the Azza case, in that "case", pick one with non-reference design 7970 will likely minimize your temperatures, as they recirculate air in the case unlike reference designs which dumps hot air out the back. So if you have a good airflow in the case, especially in the GPU area, this is not an issue.
October 28, 2012 3:54:47 PM

legendaswd said:
Thanksss! The only question I have left is: the parts required for a computer to work are all listed up there right...? There's no hidden cards that I need to know about?


I didn't see a Heatsink/Fan combo (aftermarket) for your Newegg build (maybe I missed it), but if you plan on OCing, you should invest in a good Heatsink/Fan cooler.

That's all spotted.

You may NOT want those crappy computer speakers that is in the Newegg config... Try headphones if you can bear them, if not, invest in something more decent.
October 28, 2012 3:57:38 PM

Maxx_Power said:
As for your GPU choices, anything 7970 Ghz edition that's cheap should be good. The cheapest 7970's on Newegg as you linked to are not Ghz editions, and thus are a bit cheaper.

It sounds like you'll have a lot of airflow in the case with your 230mm fans in the Azza case, in that "case", pick one with non-reference design 7970 will likely minimize your temperatures, as they recirculate air in the case unlike reference designs which dumps hot air out the back. So if you have a good airflow in the case, especially in the GPU area, this is not an issue.


Soooo shall I go with the cheapest one? The cheapest Ghz edition is $449... which is the same price as the vapor x after rebate...

Thanks for all the help btw!
October 28, 2012 3:58:28 PM

Best answer selected by legendaswd.
October 28, 2012 3:59:46 PM

Maxx_Power said:
I didn't see a Heatsink/Fan combo (aftermarket) for your Newegg build (maybe I missed it), but if you plan on OCing, you should invest in a good Heatsink/Fan cooler.

That's all spotted.

You may NOT want those crappy computer speakers that is in the Newegg config... Try headphones if you can bear them, if not, invest in something more decent.


Do you recommend any heatsink/fan combo? Are they easy to install? :p 
Lol, Ill look for better ones later haha
October 28, 2012 5:08:49 PM

legendaswd said:
Do you recommend any heatsink/fan combo? Are they easy to install? :p 
Lol, Ill look for better ones later haha


The Hyper212 Plus/EVO is a good cheap heatsink that does the job. If your case has 2x120mm openings or similar, you can go integrated water like Corsair's H100. If you only have 120mm openings, you can try the H80. If not water, the rest of the air coolers are pretty good, although not as good as the best integrated water coolers (or DIY water, non-closed loops). Good names are Thermalright (hard to find right now), Noctua, Phanteks (and a few more), but they are not cheap...
November 30, 2012 3:53:34 PM

One VERY IMPORTANT element is missing. You need to buy an operating System..ie Windows 7, Win 8, Linux whatever you intend to use...If windows 8 or 7, add about $70 to cost for legit.
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