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Transferring OEM Windows 7 to new computer

Last response: in Windows 7
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February 19, 2012 6:59:28 AM

Hi, my brother has purchased parts and is going to build his computer next week. His old desktop has Windows 7 installed on it and it is an Asus. My question is, Can I install windows 7 onto his new PC with his old CD key? I already have the Windows 7 on a disc. When it asks for a serial key, can he just enter in the one from his old desktop or will it recognize that it is a new computer and not allow it?
Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2012 7:08:06 AM

srlthaballa said:
Hi, my brother has purchased parts and is going to build his computer next week. His old desktop has Windows 7 installed on it and it is an Asus. My question is, Can I install windows 7 onto his new PC with his old CD key? I already have the Windows 7 on a disc. When it asks for a serial key, can he just enter in the one from his old desktop or will it recognize that it is a new computer and not allow it?


OEM windows will only work one one computer/motherboard.
February 19, 2012 7:09:07 AM

Have to buy a new copy.
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February 19, 2012 7:12:03 AM

A perviously-used OEM license is not transferable to a new PC.
February 19, 2012 7:13:47 AM

Yupp, just found that out. Bummer, thanks guys.
February 19, 2012 8:14:34 AM

I believe that the oem versions lock into the manaufacturer of the original motherboard install. Therefore if the new mobo is Asus it should install ok.

After all, I cannot see it, that if you have a mobo warranty failure , then would have to buy a new O/s to work on the replacement mobo. After all, the replacement mobo may well be an upgraded/revised version of the bord that failed.

As long as the original machine is taken out of use, then I cannot see what M'soft would be worried about. One O/S one machine
February 19, 2012 8:27:40 AM

mahatmacoat said:
As long as the original machine is taken out of use, then I cannot see what M'soft would be worried about. One O/S one machine


That is not what the OEM license agreement says. Replacement of damaged parts notwithstanding, an OEM license is only valid for the computer the OS was first installed upon. Any other use is a violation of the license agreement and exposes the user to civil and/or criminal liability. Suggesting otherwise in a public forum is not very bright.
February 19, 2012 8:34:35 AM

sewalk said:
That is not what the OEM license agreement says. Replacement of damaged parts notwithstanding, an OEM license is only valid for the computer the OS was first installed upon. Any other use is a violation of the license agreement and exposes the user to civil and/or criminal liability. Suggesting otherwise in a public forum is not very bright.


Not very bright is it?

So, what term describes an original machine? You appear to be saying that a motherboard upgrade means it's still an original machine.

How about a H/D failure, does it become a different computer to the one the O/S was originally installed on? Especially after a mobo upgrade?

Sounds like the O/P should upgrade the original box, eh?
February 19, 2012 8:59:01 AM

In some situations, Microsoft can have a pretty narrow definition of what constitutes a new computer. For system refurbishers, it's not even allowed to upgrade to a faster CPU and still use the original OEM license. I'm not an intellectual property lawyer so I'm not even going to state an opinion about a hypothetical motherboard upgrade but the OP specifically stated that this was a new PC build. That will be a new computer under any reasonable definition I've heard of.
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2012 10:18:01 AM

Of course sewalk is right within 'the letter of the law', but practically speaking there does seem to be a bit of leeway on activation when you use the telephone method. Personally I have never even been asked what I'd done to the machine, and have yet to be refused. I wonder how many have been prosecuted for transgressing? Not heard of anyone. Suck it and see might be an option, full in the knowledge why refusal might be the result, and aware that strictly speaking you shouldn't...
February 19, 2012 10:29:34 AM

In license terms - No
In reality 3 different computers and multiple hardware changes, still the same license
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2012 11:02:20 AM

Found this when doing some research
http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/window...

In particular the 8 points check
If I buy a Hewlett Packard with 1 Gig of RAM and OEM Windows 7 pre-installed does installing 4 Gigs of Kingston RAM from TigerDirect.com invalidate my OEM Windows 7 License?
No, Windows Product Activation checks eight different categories of hardware: •Display Adapter
•SCSI Adapter
•IDE Adapter
•Network Adapter (including the MAC Address)
•RAM Amount Range (e.g. 0-512 MB)
•Processor Type and Serial Number
•Hard Drive Device and Volume Serial Number
•Optical Drive (e.g. CD-ROM)

NO mention of motherboard!!
February 19, 2012 11:16:29 AM

dodger46 said:
NO mention of motherboard!!

Yeah but where are the hard drive and network adapters located?

Unless a motherboard fails, it's unusual to replace it without replacing the processor, too.

That's 3 out of 8.
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2012 11:50:20 AM

Hi :) 

You can do it buts its illegal.....

All the best Brett :) 
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2012 11:55:17 AM

Good point, but the general gist from the answers on the forum seem to suggest an element of flexibility. Re-activation of an OEM is down to whoever you get on the phone!
February 19, 2012 1:56:44 PM

The fact is, its an unenforceable M'soft "condition" .

Whilst they may get some milieage in a corporate scenario, bullying an individual would get spectacular negative exposure.

As for not mentioning the Mobo maker,think about it.

Personally, sell me it, its mine. Want to play games its not? Never buy your product again. *** off
Anonymous
a b $ Windows 7
February 19, 2012 3:36:53 PM

mahatmacoat said:
The fact is, its an unenforceable M'soft "condition" .

Whilst they may get some milieage in a corporate scenario, bullying an individual would get spectacular negative exposure.

As for not mentioning the Mobo maker,think about it.

Personally, sell me it, its mine. Want to play games its not? Never buy your product again. *** off


I agree the real issue is activating the os to install the latest updates.
!