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Only 1 6-pin PEG on my GTX 460?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 4, 2012 3:51:57 PM

Hi,
I have a Dell XPS 8300 installed with GTX 460 when I bought it.
After some research I decided to replace it with GTX 660 Ti which seems to have similar power consumption.

But when I open up the XPS, I realized that there is only 1 6-pin PEG connected to the GTX 460 and there is no spare 6-pin PEG hanging around.
All the while I thought there should be 2 connected to the GTX 460, and GTX 660 Ti would also need 2.

Does that mean I would not be able to replace the GTX 460 with GTX 660 Ti on this machine?

Thanks.

More about : pin peg gtx 460

a c 147 U Graphics card
September 4, 2012 4:05:15 PM

what is your current psu total wattage? another way for you is to upgrade your psu
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September 4, 2012 4:14:41 PM

BuT I am also curious why the GTX460 has only 1 PEG connected to it. Isn't it supposed to need 2?
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a b U Graphics card
September 4, 2012 4:21:44 PM

I'm not 100% sure, but I know the 460 is a mid-ranged card so having only 1 6-pin PCIe connector doesn't sound too odd. As for upgrading, the 660 Ti should come with a dual-molex to PCIe 6-pin adapter. For now, could you tell us your PSU wattage as well as the amperage on the 12v rail? It would help to get this solved.
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September 4, 2012 4:34:38 PM

Hi Locomoco,

BTW, where is the dual-molex supposed to be connected to?
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September 4, 2012 4:34:40 PM

I tried to look at the PSU in the chassis at all angles but only able to see Voltage and ampere.
Let me try to look again.
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a c 198 U Graphics card
September 4, 2012 5:31:10 PM

Run GPU-Z (http://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/) and tell us which 460 you have. And what brand is it? This is very peculiar, but I am interested because I am running a GTX460.

You're probably going to want to replace that power supply anyway. If its the 256-bit version GTX-460 I might be interested.
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September 4, 2012 5:33:33 PM

I believe it is 460W
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September 4, 2012 6:27:09 PM

Deemo13 said:
Run GPU-Z (http://www.techpowerup.com/gpuz/) and tell us which 460 you have. And what brand is it? This is very peculiar, but I am interested because I am running a GTX460.

You're probably going to want to replace that power supply anyway. If its the 256-bit version GTX-460 I might be interested.


Most likely a 756mb card like i have , it has only 1 6pin, IIRC the 1gb models had 2 6pin connectors. without knowing the p/s or amperage it can be hard to guess if a 66ti will work without problems but for what your paying for a 660ti a 50 dollar p/s upgrade should be considered.
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a b U Graphics card
September 4, 2012 9:31:34 PM

goh69 said:
Hi,
I have a Dell XPS 8300 installed with GTX 460 when I bought it.
After some research I decided to replace it with GTX 660 Ti which seems to have similar power consumption.

But when I open up the XPS, I realized that there is only 1 6-pin PEG connected to the GTX 460 and there is no spare 6-pin PEG hanging around.
All the while I thought there should be 2 connected to the GTX 460, and GTX 660 Ti would also need 2.

Does that mean I would not be able to replace the GTX 460 with GTX 660 Ti on this machine?

Thanks.

http://www.google.com/products/catalog?q=pcie+power+spl...
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 12:08:53 AM

goh69 said:
Hi Locomoco,

BTW, where is the dual-molex supposed to be connected to?

The connector has 2 molex plugs leading to a 6-pin PCIe connector, if your PSU has two extra molex, you will be set. But honestly, a new PSU might be the best solution. Here take a look at these:

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681... (pretty much the minimum for running a 660Ti as nVidia does recommend at least 500W and my 670 requires at least 32A, this provides 34. This is also a good brand and is 80Plus certified for good efficiency) $59.94

http://www.newegg.ca/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1681... (where I would start as it provides 444W and 44A on the 12v rail, perfect for what you need as well as having a higher efficiency rating) 79.99

I know this thread wasn't asking for PSUs, but if you don't want to kill your brand-spankin' new GPU, then I would highly consider upgrading it. The molex solution is really not recommended as the power draw from them can be iffy and can hurt the card. Hope this helps and if you need more help, please ask.
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 12:12:21 AM


But wouldn't cutting the already restrained power into to connections not provide enough power to the GPU, from what I've read, not having enough power to the GPU will allow it to run, but at lower GPU settings as it cannot get enough power?
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 12:52:06 AM

locomoco321 said:
But wouldn't cutting the already restrained power into to connections not provide enough power to the GPU, from what I've read, not having enough power to the GPU will allow it to run, but at lower GPU settings as it cannot get enough power?


Already restrained power ?

2 connections on one cable ( Antec EA500D )


Some revisions of the Dell 460 power supply are equipped the same

You can also find them on some highly rated power supplies
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

Quad SLI GTX480 on the above psu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7V13ZGIZgYY

No problem with power delivery using a splitter





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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 1:26:10 AM

delluser1 said:
Already restrained power ?

2 connections on one cable ( Antec EA500D )
http://i1081.photobucket.com/albums/j351/contrvlr/dualpcie.jpg

Some revisions of the Dell 460 power supply are equipped the same

You can also find them on some highly rated power supplies
http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=...

Quad SLI GTX480 on the above psu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7V13ZGIZgYY

No problem with power delivery using a splitter

Yeah but the PSU has 8 12v rails as well as 1500W, even using splitters, I wouldn't expect performance drop for this high wattage PSU. The problem is that I'm going by nVidia spec which asks for a minimum of 500W and around 30A on the 12v rail. He doesn't have that, so if it's for compatibility reasons, sure it would work fine and run, but not with the expected performance. I've seen threads as well as first hand with my friend's computer that degrade the performance of a card because they are not receiving adequate power. I hope that I didn't sound too harsh, but I, like you, want to help and get this person off and running, I just have concerns with his current PSU.
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 1:56:07 AM

locomoco321 said:
Yeah but the PSU has 8 12v rails as well as 1500W, even using splitters, I wouldn't expect performance drop for this high wattage PSU. The problem is that I'm going by nVidia spec which asks for a minimum of 500W and around 30A on the 12v rail. He doesn't have that, so if it's for compatibility reasons, sure it would work fine and run, but not with the expected performance. I've seen threads as well as first hand with my friend's computer that degrade the performance of a card because they are not receiving adequate power. I hope that I didn't sound too harsh, but I, like you, want to help and get this person off and running, I just have concerns with his current PSU.

Doesn't sound harsh
The point of providing that info was to show that dual connector cable's have no problem delivering power ( to much more power hungry cards ), the fact that the psu used in the video has 8 rails and provides 1500 watts is meaningless ( the EA500 only has 2 rails and well 500 watts )
He wants to upgrade from a 150 watt rated card that uses a single connector to a 150 watt rated card that uses dual connectors
The system was sold with more powerful cards ( GTX260 and HD5870 ) using the same power supply
Can't see a reason for any concern.
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 12:06:10 PM

delluser1 said:
Doesn't sound harsh
The point of providing that info was to show that dual connector cable's have no problem delivering power ( to much more power hungry cards ), the fact that the psu used in the video has 8 rails and provides 1500 watts is meaningless ( the EA500 only has 2 rails and well 500 watts )
He wants to upgrade from a 150 watt rated card that uses a single connector to a 150 watt rated card that uses dual connectors
The system was sold with more powerful cards ( GTX260 and HD5870 ) using the same power supply
Can't see a reason for any concern.

You made a point there. Your solution makes sense, don't get me wrong, it's just that his 460W PSU is lower than nVidia recommends and that's why I'm concerned. I know the dual molex and PCIe splitters work (that's the purpose of them), it's just the PSU is low to begin with.

I know that in pretty much every case, the 150W rated card never even hits 140W, as with the other PC components. nVidia is recommending a higher PSU in case the cards and PC components really max out the power draw from the PSU.

Third "point", if he has been running a 460 no problem on his system that has the same power rating, then the previous problems I stated start to dissolve. I believe the PCIe lane provides 75W and a 6-pin can provide 75W, to total, 150W. The 12v rail (provided a worst-case scenario) on his PSU may only deliver a max on 400W. I don't know the name and or really anything more about his PSU, but some more "generic" PSUs are known to provide even less usable power. If his power supply has aged from the time of the 400-series cards, then I could assume the PSU will provide less. As it ages more, it will provide less power to his components. How much power can it provide is what I'm asking

My concerns are with the PSU, not the splitters, if he had the PSU but not the connectors, I'd be all up for using splitters.
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 1:10:30 PM

locomoco321 said:
You made a point there. Your solution makes sense, don't get me wrong, it's just that his 460W PSU is lower than nVidia recommends and that's why I'm concerned. I know the dual molex and PCIe splitters work (that's the purpose of them), it's just the PSU is low to begin with.

I know that in pretty much every case, the 150W rated card never even hits 140W, as with the other PC components. nVidia is recommending a higher PSU in case the cards and PC components really max out the power draw from the PSU.

Third "point", if he has been running a 460 no problem on his system that has the same power rating, then the previous problems I stated start to dissolve. I believe the PCIe lane provides 75W and a 6-pin can provide 75W, to total, 150W. The 12v rail (provided a worst-case scenario) on his PSU may only deliver a max on 400W. I don't know the name and or really anything more about his PSU, but some more "generic" PSUs are known to provide even less usable power. If his power supply has aged from the time of the 400-series cards, then I could assume the PSU will provide less. As it ages more, it will provide less power to his components. How much power can it provide is what I'm asking

My concerns are with the PSU, not the splitters, if he had the PSU but not the connectors, I'd be all up for using splitters.

The 6 pin can provide much more than 75 watts, if not they couldn't double up the connectors on the end of the cable
People tend to put far too much stock in psu "aging"
I've used a modified 5 year old Dell 375w to beat on a pair of 147 watt 8800's, took several months of running Furmark a few times a day to kill it ( I've smoked more power supplies on purpose than 99% of the people on here will ever own )
Like I said, no reason for concern
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 7:12:35 PM

delluser1 said:
The 6 pin can provide much more than 75 watts, if not they couldn't double up the connectors on the end of the cable
People tend to put far too much stock in psu "aging"
I've used a modified 5 year old Dell 375w to beat on a pair of 147 watt 8800's, took several months of running Furmark a few times a day to kill it ( I've smoked more power supplies on purpose than 99% of the people on here will ever own )
Like I said, no reason for concern

It seems that you have experience with this type of stuff so I guess I can learn a lesson from this. Like I said, I was going by nVidia spec, so that's where my concern came from. So if your sure the 6-pin splitter will work, then go for it!
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a b U Graphics card
September 5, 2012 7:12:53 PM

delluser1 said:
The 6 pin can provide much more than 75 watts, if not they couldn't double up the connectors on the end of the cable
People tend to put far too much stock in psu "aging"
I've used a modified 5 year old Dell 375w to beat on a pair of 147 watt 8800's, took several months of running Furmark a few times a day to kill it ( I've smoked more power supplies on purpose than 99% of the people on here will ever own )
Like I said, no reason for concern

It seems that you have experience with this type of stuff so I guess I can learn a lesson from this. Like I said, I was going by nVidia spec, so that's where my concern came from. So if your sure the 6-pin splitter will work, then go for it!
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!