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What used digital SLR to buy

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Anonymous
January 29, 2005 6:23:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.

But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?

About me:

I'm reasonably knowledgeable about photography, at least the ancient
variety that involves film. I've got a couple of Canon AE-1 bodies
and six lenses ranging from 17 to 200mm. I know that I won't be able
to use the lenses effectively with any digital I get. (I've heard of
the FD-EOS adapter, but it seems VERY clumsy)

I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
modest tele would be nice.

I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
to make my own adjustments.

I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.

I like shooting at night. I don't mind having to steady the camera. I
don't like flash very much. But, looking toward the future, I'd like
to be able to control off-camera flash.

It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.

It would also be nice if the whole CAMERA would last a while, although
I'm sure they will need more careful handling than my old Canons.

I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
Possible?

Greg Guarino

More about : digital slr buy

Anonymous
January 29, 2005 6:23:15 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

> Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
> who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>
> But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
> be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?

Digital Rebels seem to sell for relatively cheap, and if you wait 1-2
months, they'll probably get a lot cheaper. (Search groups.google.com for
"d350" or "rebel xt" to see why.)

> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
> modest tele would be nice.

Whichever you go for, 17mm or 18mm is about as wide as the kit lenses
will be, and with the crop factor, that comes out to about 28mm equivalent
FOV. If you want shorter than that, then you start spending a lot of
money - assuming you're not going to want to drop just 1mm to a 17mm, the
next non-fisheye lens would be a Sigma 12-24 for $670, then the Canon EF-S
10-22 for $800.

> I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
> be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
> to make my own adjustments.

I believe that all of the dSLRs will let you shoot in full manual mode,
if you want.

> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.

8x10s look pretty darn good with 6 megapixels. I've seen a couple of
20"x30" prints that looked fairly respectable from 6 megapixels, although
they were pictures without tons of detail to begin with. Trying to enlarge
a high-detail print that high might disapoint.

> It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.

Any of them with lithium batteries.

> I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
> favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
> Possible?

Brand new, silver DigiRebs are only $770 after Canon's rebate, so I
wouldn't expect to pay more than $650 on ebay (although some people still
do) - but again, after April 4th (or thereabouts) when the Digital Rebel XT
is released, the "old" Digital Rebels should drop even more.

steve
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 7:21:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 1/28/05 9:23 PM, in article 31ulv0p4m986rb688lk4udml20p949rfb4@4ax.com,
"Greg G" <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote:

> Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
> who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>
> But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
> be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?
>
> About me:
>
> I'm reasonably knowledgeable about photography, at least the ancient
> variety that involves film. I've got a couple of Canon AE-1 bodies
> and six lenses ranging from 17 to 200mm. I know that I won't be able
> to use the lenses effectively with any digital I get. (I've heard of
> the FD-EOS adapter, but it seems VERY clumsy)
>
> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
> modest tele would be nice.
>
> I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
> be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
> to make my own adjustments.
>
> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>
> I like shooting at night. I don't mind having to steady the camera. I
> don't like flash very much. But, looking toward the future, I'd like
> to be able to control off-camera flash.
>
> It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.
>
> It would also be nice if the whole CAMERA would last a while, although
> I'm sure they will need more careful handling than my old Canons.
>
> I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
> favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
> Possible?
>
> Greg Guarino
Any of the big names in digital SLRs that have just been replaced with a
newer model would probably fit your criteria. One good recommendation might
be the Canon 10D (just replaced by the 20D). It has plenty of modes,
including fully manual. Also, if you believe the rumors the dRebel is soon
about to be replaced with a newer model.
Chuck
Related resources
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 7:36:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Fri, 28 Jan 2005 21:16:02 -0700, "Steve Wolfe" <unt@codon.com>
wrote:


>
>> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
>> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
>> modest tele would be nice.
>
> Whichever you go for, 17mm or 18mm is about as wide as the kit lenses
>will be, and with the crop factor, that comes out to about 28mm equivalent
>FOV. If you want shorter than that, then you start spending a lot of
>money - assuming you're not going to want to drop just 1mm to a 17mm, the
>next non-fisheye lens would be a Sigma 12-24 for $670, then the Canon EF-S
>10-22 for $800.

That much I'm aware of. I wouldn't buy a really wide lens right off,
but I want to have the ability to add that on in the future.


>
> Brand new, silver DigiRebs are only $770 after Canon's rebate, so I
>wouldn't expect to pay more than $650 on ebay (although some people still
>do) - but again, after April 4th (or thereabouts) when the Digital Rebel XT
>is released, the "old" Digital Rebels should drop even more.
>
>steve
>
Hmmm... Sounds interesting. Thanks.

Greg Guarino
January 29, 2005 10:52:06 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote in
news:31ulv0p4m986rb688lk4udml20p949rfb4@4ax.com:

> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>

What do you mean by "large"?

Why do you think you need an SLR, rather than one of the higher quality non
-slr digital cameras?

--
Delete the inverse SPAM to reply
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 11:40:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Steve Wolfe" <unt@codon.com> writes:

> Brand new, silver DigiRebs are only $770 after Canon's rebate, so I
> wouldn't expect to pay more than $650 on ebay (although some people still
> do) - but again, after April 4th (or thereabouts) when the Digital Rebel XT
> is released, the "old" Digital Rebels should drop even more.

However, you had better check the details, and possibly move fast. I believe
Canon's rebate ends at the end of January (ie, in 2 days). Note, the digital
rebel has many/some of the manual features that the 10D had removed, but there
is a russian hack that gives you back most of the features at a cost of voiding
the warranty.

--
Michael Meissner
email: mrmnews@the-meissners.org
http://www.the-meissners.org
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 3:57:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Greg G wrote:
>
> Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
> who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>
> But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
> be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?
>
> About me:
>
> I'm reasonably knowledgeable about photography, at least the ancient
> variety that involves film. I've got a couple of Canon AE-1 bodies
> and six lenses ranging from 17 to 200mm. I know that I won't be able
> to use the lenses effectively with any digital I get. (I've heard of
> the FD-EOS adapter, but it seems VERY clumsy)
>
> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
> modest tele would be nice.

That all clearly points to a DSLR.

>
> I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
> be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
> to make my own adjustments.

They can all be operated in full manual mode. Some low end models make
this less convenient though.

>
> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.

You said elsewhere mostly 4x6 with a very occasional 8x10. 3MP is
sufficient for good quality for your needs, and requires less storage
space than larger sizes.

>
> I like shooting at night. I don't mind having to steady the camera. I
> don't like flash very much. But, looking toward the future, I'd like
> to be able to control off-camera flash.

Not sure what you mean, but most can do off camera TTL and/or Non TTL
Automatic.

>
> It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.
>
> It would also be nice if the whole CAMERA would last a while, although
> I'm sure they will need more careful handling than my old Canons.
>
> I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
> favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
> Possible?

I'm familiar with the Canon models, so can only speak to them for your
needs. A D30 or D60 would fit all of your parameters, and you can
likely get one for your specified budget. However, IMHO both of those
models have poor AF, particularly in low light. A 10D would be a large
improvement in this regard, but would stretch your budget.

I would suggest to see if you can try a D30/60, and see if you are okay
with the operational compromises. If so, you're all set.

Lisa
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 6:59:09 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Steve Wolfe wrote:

>>Also, if you believe the rumors the dRebel is soon
>>about to be replaced with a newer model.
>
>
> http://www.upcdatabase.com/item.pl?upc=013803049626

That's clever! A way to get a feel for what's coming ahead of time...!

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 8:14:11 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Friday 28 January 2005 19:23, Greg G wrote:

> Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
> who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>
> But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
> be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?
>
> About me:
>
> I'm reasonably knowledgeable about photography, at least the ancient
> variety that involves film. I've got a couple of Canon AE-1 bodies
> and six lenses ranging from 17 to 200mm. I know that I won't be able
> to use the lenses effectively with any digital I get. (I've heard of
> the FD-EOS adapter, but it seems VERY clumsy)
>
> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
> modest tele would be nice.
>
> I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
> be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
> to make my own adjustments.
>
> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>
> I like shooting at night. I don't mind having to steady the camera. I
> don't like flash very much. But, looking toward the future, I'd like
> to be able to control off-camera flash.
>
> It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.
>
> It would also be nice if the whole CAMERA would last a while, although
> I'm sure they will need more careful handling than my old Canons.
>
> I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
> favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
> Possible?

Yes!

I think a used Canon D30 and a Sigma 18-50mm f3.5-5.6 DC lens will fit
your budget as well as most of your requirements. D30s on eBay in Ex+
condition are going for around $400 US, and you can get a new 18-50 for
about $100 from most mail order photo dealers. That's quite a deal
considering when the D30 debuted in mid-2000, that it went for almost
$3000!

The D30 is, in my opinion, the DSLR "sleeper" on eBay, mainly because of
its 3MP rating. (Most buyers are going for 6MP models like the D60,
10D, Nikon D100 or D70, and Fuji S1 or S2, etc.) However, don't let
that throw you off. Its CMOS APS-C sized (about 15 x 22mm) sensor
produces exceptionally sharp, noise free images, that you can easily
upsample, when you need to produce prints bigger than 8x10. Actually,
the image file produced "in camera" is really intended for post
processing to a final image, anyway, rather than going straight to
print out of the camera. I was impressed enough with it to buy one
just last week, even though all my 35mm film equipment is Nikon.

If, however, you're still wary of that 3MP sensor, then go with the D60.
Same low noise CMOS type sensor, same sharp images, but 6MP with
improved performance and features over the D30. But it'll cost you
about $200 to $300 more.

Read the reviews and specs for both at www.dpreview.com and
www.steves-digicams.com

--
Stefan Patric
NoLife Polymath Group
tootek2@yahoo.com
January 29, 2005 9:48:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"bob" <usenetMAPS@2fiddles.com> wrote in message
news:Xns95ED5A6FBF46Ebobatcarolnet@216.196.97.142...
> Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote in
> news:31ulv0p4m986rb688lk4udml20p949rfb4@4ax.com:
>
> > I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
> > means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
> >
>
> What do you mean by "large"?
>
> Why do you think you need an SLR, rather than one of the higher quality
non
> -slr digital cameras?
>
The APS-C sensor is bigger and results in a better image than the 1/3"
sensors in most point&shoots, or the 2/3" sensor in the high-end digicams.
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 11:06:16 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 03:23:14 GMT, Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net>
wrote:

>Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
>who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>
>But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
>be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?

Canon's 300 seems to be the best choice in that regard.
-Rich
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 11:07:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 07:52:06 -0600, bob <usenetMAPS@2fiddles.com>
wrote:

>Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote in
>news:31ulv0p4m986rb688lk4udml20p949rfb4@4ax.com:
>
>> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
>> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>>
>
>What do you mean by "large"?
I think I've got exactly 2 pictures in my house that are 8x10. Most of
my pictures stay as 4x6; the better ones sometimes get to 5x7.

>Why do you think you need an SLR, rather than one of the higher quality non
>-slr digital cameras?

1. I want to be able to change lenses. I am especially interested in
wide-angle photography and I'm pretty sure that no camera's "built-in"
lens goes as wide as I would like. I understand that it will be an
expensive proposition to get such a wide lens, but I don't need to do
it right away. I've got lenses for my film cameras that go from 17mm
to 200mm. Even if someone were to make such a zoom, it wouldn't be
likely to do the whole range well.

2. I like to have control over the other parameters that SLRs
typically provide. I like to be able to set the aperture to control
depth of field and shutter speed to freeze action or deliberately blur
it.

3. I like to look through the actual lens that's taking the picture to
help gauge the depth of field. I'm hoping that depth of field preview
is something I might find on a digital. I suppose that could be
covered by the display, but it wouldn't be nearly as detailed.

4. I'd like to be able to focus manually, sometimes, particularly when
I've got close foreground objects mixed with distant ones. Autofocus
is nice for shooting pictures of (moving) people.

In short, I like the flexibility and control that I'm used to with my
film SLRs.

Greg Guarino
Anonymous
January 29, 2005 11:25:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 20:07:30 GMT, Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> 2. I like to have control over the other parameters that SLRs
> typically provide. I like to be able to set the aperture to control
> depth of field and shutter speed to freeze action or deliberately blur
> it.

Many point-and-shoots let you set aperture and shutter speed
manually. But with their small sensors, you're likely to have
more DOF than you want in some situations. And DSLRs have usable
high ISOs, which is nice for freezing action. (I'm addicted to
available light, and, having recently switched from P&S to DSLR,
I can't get over how easy it is to get shots that I would have
missed in the past.)

> 3. I like to look through the actual lens that's taking the picture to
> help gauge the depth of field. I'm hoping that depth of field preview
> is something I might find on a digital.

I can tell you for a fact that it's present on the 20D, at least.

I dreamed recently that when I used DOF preview, the image in the
viewfinder went black-and-white. Neat feature. I was psyched until
about an hour after I woke up, when it occurred to me that that was
completely impossible, and I realized I'd had a dream.

> 4. I'd like to be able to focus manually, sometimes, particularly when
> I've got close foreground objects mixed with distant ones.

My experience with the Olympus 8080 was that while it offered manual
focus, the controls for that were awkward, and I couldn't tell when
things were in focus -- possibly due to excessive DOF, possibly due
to the relatively low resolution of the EVF (compared to an optical
viewfinder).

--
Ben Rosengart (212) 741-4400 x215
Sometimes it only makes sense to focus our attention on those
questions that are equal parts trivial and intriguing.
--Josh Micah Marshall
Anonymous
January 30, 2005 1:21:14 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Darrell wrote:


> Same Sony sensor as this?
> http://www.upcdatabase.com/item.pl?upc=043325995606

I think I get it now. What a coincidence that that entry appears on 29 Jan...

I've been had!

Cheers,
Alan
--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
January 30, 2005 3:08:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Alan Browne" <alan.browne@freelunchVideotron.ca> wrote in message
news:ctiu19$lav$1@inews.gazeta.pl...
> Darrell wrote:
>
>
> > Same Sony sensor as this?
> > http://www.upcdatabase.com/item.pl?upc=043325995606
>
> I think I get it now. What a coincidence that that entry appears on 29
Jan...
>
> I've been had!
>
> Cheers,
> Alan
>
Just to prove if it's on the Internet, doesn't make it true...
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 2:38:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Which series of lens fit the D30?


Thanks
Bill


"Lisa Horton" <Lisa091704@lisahorton.net> wrote in message
news:41FBF89E.58F273E1@lisahorton.net...
>
> I would suggest to see if you can try a D30/60, and see if you are okay
> with the operational compromises. If so, you're all set.
>
> Lisa
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 2:38:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

All EF mount lenses fit the D30, D60 and 10D, but not FD or EF-S. EF-S
lenses only fit the Rebel Digital/300D and the 20D, so far.
I bought a used D30 in Sept, 2003 (for $400) to see if digital was a
direction I wanted to go. It was a good intro to the medium, and it used
the lenses from my older AF bodies, the A2 and 1n. When I did decide that
it was the direction I was going, I bought a 20D, and kept the D30 as a back
up.

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
"bill a" <custom4173@sbcglobalDOTnet.invalid> wrote in message
news:aeeLd.12071$2e7.6099@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
> Which series of lens fit the D30?
>
>
> Thanks
> Bill
>
>
> "Lisa Horton" <Lisa091704@lisahorton.net> wrote in message
> news:41FBF89E.58F273E1@lisahorton.net...
>>
>> I would suggest to see if you can try a D30/60, and see if you are okay
>> with the operational compromises. If so, you're all set.
>>
>> Lisa
>
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 2:41:54 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I just got a pretty good buy on a D30 body, but I'm confused on lens
compatibility.
Do the 18-55 EF-S lens (from Digital Rebels) work on the D30?
What other lens series work OK, if I'm willing to forego the automation?
Thanks
Bill



"Stefan Patric" <writeme@addressbelow.com> wrote in message
news:CyWKd.55$Tt.54@fed1read05...
> On Friday 28 January 2005 19:23, Greg G wrote:
>
>> Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
>> who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>>
>> But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
>> be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?
>>
>> About me:
>>
>> I'm reasonably knowledgeable about photography, at least the ancient
>> variety that involves film. I've got a couple of Canon AE-1 bodies
>> and six lenses ranging from 17 to 200mm. I know that I won't be able
>> to use the lenses effectively with any digital I get. (I've heard of
>> the FD-EOS adapter, but it seems VERY clumsy)
>>
>> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
>> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
>> modest tele would be nice.
>>
>> I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
>> be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
>> to make my own adjustments.
>>
>> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
>> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>>
>> I like shooting at night. I don't mind having to steady the camera. I
>> don't like flash very much. But, looking toward the future, I'd like
>> to be able to control off-camera flash.
>>
>> It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.
>>
>> It would also be nice if the whole CAMERA would last a while, although
>> I'm sure they will need more careful handling than my old Canons.
>>
>> I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
>> favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
>> Possible?
>
> Yes!
>
> I think a used Canon D30 and a Sigma 18-50mm f3.5-5.6 DC lens will fit
> your budget as well as most of your requirements. D30s on eBay in Ex+
> condition are going for around $400 US, and you can get a new 18-50 for
> about $100 from most mail order photo dealers. That's quite a deal
> considering when the D30 debuted in mid-2000, that it went for almost
> $3000!
>
> The D30 is, in my opinion, the DSLR "sleeper" on eBay, mainly because of
> its 3MP rating. (Most buyers are going for 6MP models like the D60,
> 10D, Nikon D100 or D70, and Fuji S1 or S2, etc.) However, don't let
> that throw you off. Its CMOS APS-C sized (about 15 x 22mm) sensor
> produces exceptionally sharp, noise free images, that you can easily
> upsample, when you need to produce prints bigger than 8x10. Actually,
> the image file produced "in camera" is really intended for post
> processing to a final image, anyway, rather than going straight to
> print out of the camera. I was impressed enough with it to buy one
> just last week, even though all my 35mm film equipment is Nikon.
>
> If, however, you're still wary of that 3MP sensor, then go with the D60.
> Same low noise CMOS type sensor, same sharp images, but 6MP with
> improved performance and features over the D30. But it'll cost you
> about $200 to $300 more.
>
> Read the reviews and specs for both at www.dpreview.com and
> www.steves-digicams.com
>
> --
> Stefan Patric
> NoLife Polymath Group
> tootek2@yahoo.com
January 31, 2005 2:41:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"bill a" <custom4173@sbcglobalDOTnet.invalid> wrote in message
news:6heLd.12072$2e7.2062@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
> I just got a pretty good buy on a D30 body, but I'm confused on lens
> compatibility.
> Do the 18-55 EF-S lens (from Digital Rebels) work on the D30?
> What other lens series work OK, if I'm willing to forego the automation?
> Thanks
> Bill
>
The EF-S will only work on the 20D, and Rebel. The D30, D60 and 10D use
regular EF Canon lenses
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 2:41:55 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Like Darrel said, the EF-S will only work on the RebelD and the 20D, the
only lens mount that is compatible with the D30 is the EF mount. You may
find FD to EF mount adaptors on Ebay, but there will be some image
degradation, and, of course, they'll still be manual lenses... ;-)

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
"bill a" <custom4173@sbcglobalDOTnet.invalid> wrote in message
news:6heLd.12072$2e7.2062@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>I just got a pretty good buy on a D30 body, but I'm confused on lens
>compatibility.
> Do the 18-55 EF-S lens (from Digital Rebels) work on the D30?
> What other lens series work OK, if I'm willing to forego the automation?
> Thanks
> Bill
>
>
>
> "Stefan Patric" <writeme@addressbelow.com> wrote in message
> news:CyWKd.55$Tt.54@fed1read05...
>> On Friday 28 January 2005 19:23, Greg G wrote:
>>
>>> Digital SLRs have been too expensive for me to pay much attention to
>>> who makes what model with which features, etc. They still are.
>>>
>>> But I see some less current models on Ebay that look like they might
>>> be approaching my price range. So what do I buy?
>>>
>>> About me:
>>>
>>> I'm reasonably knowledgeable about photography, at least the ancient
>>> variety that involves film. I've got a couple of Canon AE-1 bodies
>>> and six lenses ranging from 17 to 200mm. I know that I won't be able
>>> to use the lenses effectively with any digital I get. (I've heard of
>>> the FD-EOS adapter, but it seems VERY clumsy)
>>>
>>> I will want to be able to change lenses. I like wide to very wide
>>> lenses and that doesn't come standard. A zoom to cover normal to
>>> modest tele would be nice.
>>>
>>> I want the option to control as much as possible manually. There may
>>> be some whiz-bang modes I can scarcely imagine, but I like to be able
>>> to make my own adjustments.
>>>
>>> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
>>> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>>>
>>> I like shooting at night. I don't mind having to steady the camera. I
>>> don't like flash very much. But, looking toward the future, I'd like
>>> to be able to control off-camera flash.
>>>
>>> It would be nice if the batteries would last a while.
>>>
>>> It would also be nice if the whole CAMERA would last a while, although
>>> I'm sure they will need more careful handling than my old Canons.
>>>
>>> I'd love to get something decent, maybe used, maybe just fallen out of
>>> favor due to newer, better models for say $500.00 or a little more.
>>> Possible?
>>
>> Yes!
>>
>> I think a used Canon D30 and a Sigma 18-50mm f3.5-5.6 DC lens will fit
>> your budget as well as most of your requirements. D30s on eBay in Ex+
>> condition are going for around $400 US, and you can get a new 18-50 for
>> about $100 from most mail order photo dealers. That's quite a deal
>> considering when the D30 debuted in mid-2000, that it went for almost
>> $3000!
>>
>> The D30 is, in my opinion, the DSLR "sleeper" on eBay, mainly because of
>> its 3MP rating. (Most buyers are going for 6MP models like the D60,
>> 10D, Nikon D100 or D70, and Fuji S1 or S2, etc.) However, don't let
>> that throw you off. Its CMOS APS-C sized (about 15 x 22mm) sensor
>> produces exceptionally sharp, noise free images, that you can easily
>> upsample, when you need to produce prints bigger than 8x10. Actually,
>> the image file produced "in camera" is really intended for post
>> processing to a final image, anyway, rather than going straight to
>> print out of the camera. I was impressed enough with it to buy one
>> just last week, even though all my 35mm film equipment is Nikon.
>>
>> If, however, you're still wary of that 3MP sensor, then go with the D60.
>> Same low noise CMOS type sensor, same sharp images, but 6MP with
>> improved performance and features over the D30. But it'll cost you
>> about $200 to $300 more.
>>
>> Read the reviews and specs for both at www.dpreview.com and
>> www.steves-digicams.com
>>
>> --
>> Stefan Patric
>> NoLife Polymath Group
>> tootek2@yahoo.com
>
Anonymous
January 31, 2005 6:37:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Thanks for the info
Bill

"Skip M" <shadowcatcher@cox.net> wrote in message
news:UJeLd.222$mt.193@fed1read03...
> All EF mount lenses fit the D30, D60 and 10D, but not FD or EF-S. EF-S
> lenses only fit the Rebel Digital/300D and the 20D, so far.
> I bought a used D30 in Sept, 2003 (for $400) to see if digital was a
> direction I wanted to go. It was a good intro to the medium, and it used
> the lenses from my older AF bodies, the A2 and 1n. When I did decide that
> it was the direction I was going, I bought a 20D, and kept the D30 as a
> back up.
>
> --
> Skip Middleton
> http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
> "bill a" <custom4173@sbcglobalDOTnet.invalid> wrote in message
> news:aeeLd.12071$2e7.6099@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>> Which series of lens fit the D30?
>>
>>
>> Thanks
>> Bill
>>
>>
>> "Lisa Horton" <Lisa091704@lisahorton.net> wrote in message
>> news:41FBF89E.58F273E1@lisahorton.net...
>>>
>>> I would suggest to see if you can try a D30/60, and see if you are okay
>>> with the operational compromises. If so, you're all set.
>>>
>>> Lisa
>>
>
>
January 31, 2005 10:40:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote in
news:bkpnv05rgtk1b6nr9pdukvajfpfhp448kb@4ax.com:

> On Sat, 29 Jan 2005 07:52:06 -0600, bob <usenetMAPS@2fiddles.com>
> wrote:
>
>>Greg G <gdguarino@verizon.net> wrote in
>>news:31ulv0p4m986rb688lk4udml20p949rfb4@4ax.com:
>>
>>> I will probably infrequently make large prints. I'm guessing that
>>> means I can get away with less than the latest, greatest resolution.
>>>
>>
>>What do you mean by "large"?
> I think I've got exactly 2 pictures in my house that are 8x10. Most of
> my pictures stay as 4x6; the better ones sometimes get to 5x7.

I thought it might be important to clarify that point -- for me, 16x20 is
large, and 8x10 is typical.


>>Why do you think you need an SLR, rather than one of the higher
>>quality non -slr digital cameras?
>
> 1. I want to be able to change lenses. I am especially interested in
> wide-angle photography and I'm pretty sure that no camera's "built-in"
> lens goes as wide as I would like. I understand that it will be an
> expensive proposition to get such a wide lens, but I don't need to do
> it right away. I've got lenses for my film cameras that go from 17mm
> to 200mm. Even if someone were to make such a zoom, it wouldn't be
> likely to do the whole range well.
>
> 2. I like to have control over the other parameters that SLRs
> typically provide. I like to be able to set the aperture to control
> depth of field and shutter speed to freeze action or deliberately blur
> it.

You might be surprised though. Most of the better P&S offer full
controls, but they are harder to operate. Manual focus, in particular, is
a pain on my camera. That's one of the big draws of an SLR for me.

My camera has an equiv of 19mm with the accessory lens. I know there are
some people who buy the Nikon 8400 and the Nikon 8800, which, taken as a
pair, offer an extraordinary focal range, while costing less than an SLR
and a couple lenses. I'm not saying that it's the right choice for you,
but you might want to take a look to compare the options. The 8400 lens
has a wide end of 24mm, and with the accessory, I believe it is 17mm.
These lenses do have some barrel distortion, but that's easy to fix in
Photoshop.


> 3. I like to look through the actual lens that's taking the picture to
> help gauge the depth of field. I'm hoping that depth of field preview
> is something I might find on a digital. I suppose that could be
> covered by the display, but it wouldn't be nearly as detailed.
>
> 4. I'd like to be able to focus manually, sometimes, particularly when
> I've got close foreground objects mixed with distant ones. Autofocus
> is nice for shooting pictures of (moving) people.
>

These last two are definite weak spots in the P&S arena. DOF preview
might not be as important as you think. In many situations where you have
time to use it, you could just as easily shoot a test picture and see.
DOF review, in a manner of speaking. With my camera, the sensor is so
small it seems like just about everything is in focus, no matter what...

Bob

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