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HD 7870 to PCI-Express x16

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 8, 2012 4:13:53 AM

i would like to ask if this video card work and compatible to my computer.. i have old computer..

here is my motherboard http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=ConRoe1333-...

and this is the video card i want to buy http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

about the processor i think intel 945g

power supply 500watts

2gb ram

if the video card will not work can you pls give me a good video card that compatible to my computer

thanks

More about : 7870 pci express x16

a b U Graphics card
September 8, 2012 4:20:04 AM

The card will fit in the PCIe x 16 slot, and that Sapphire card is a great card, but the real problem will be your processor. It's a very old model and will heavily bottleneck a 7870.

To answer your question yes, it is compatible. But if you're not getting the performance that you want, then a processor/motherboard upgrade is the only step forward.
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a b U Graphics card
September 8, 2012 4:22:25 AM

PCIe16 is wonderfully backwards compatible, so PCIe3 cards will work on a PCIe1 board, just know that it will run at the slower bandwidth (normally not a problem), and that you will likely hold the card back (a lot in your case) by the other parts in your system.
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September 8, 2012 4:58:50 AM

CaedenV said:
PCIe16 is wonderfully backwards compatible, so PCIe3 cards will work on a PCIe1 board, just know that it will run at the slower bandwidth (normally not a problem), and that you will likely hold the card back (a lot in your case) by the other parts in your system.


thank you sir
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September 8, 2012 5:01:17 AM

claysm said:
The card will fit in the PCIe x 16 slot, and that Sapphire card is a great card, but the real problem will be your processor. It's a very old model and will heavily bottleneck a 7870.

To answer your question yes, it is compatible. But if you're not getting the performance that you want, then a processor/motherboard upgrade is the only step forward.



all i need is a new generation LGA 775 processor?
and i will upgrade my mobo next month because my budget is only $350

is there a LGA processor that support LGA 775 and 1155? and how much

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a b U Graphics card
September 8, 2012 5:13:04 AM

775 and 1155 are entirely incompatable with eachother, and there is actuially annother whole socket generation between them (1156). 775 equipment is pretty old by today's standards, so please avoid.

If you are not overclocking, and not expecting to install more than one SSD in the future then look at MSI's motherboards with the B75 chipset. They are $50-60, and work great. A little limited on features, but if you are not a power user, then it has everything you could need.

For processors, the new i3 3xxx processors work pretty good for everything from web browsing to even moderate gaming, and they only cost $80-140. If doing heavy gaming then you will want to up that to an i5 processor, which will cost you $180-250. When looking at CPUs keep a few things in mind:
products ending in 5 have the better onboard graphics package, very important if you are not running a dedicated GPU, but not important at all if you do
products ending with T are low power products, great for tiny builds with limited cooling, but otherwise useless for desktops
products ending in K are overclockable, and should be paired with a z series chipset to get the most out of them, but if you are not overclocking then these should be avoided

For system Ram you will want a minimum of 4GB of DDR3 1600 running at 1.5V and in a 2x2GB configuration. This should cost roughly $20-25. If you want to future proof your system a bit, and have a 64bit operating system, then you should splurge on 8GB of ram with the same specs in a 2x4GB configuration.

All your other parts should transfer over pretty easily.
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September 8, 2012 6:35:10 AM

BTW sir what is a bottleneck?
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a b U Graphics card
September 8, 2012 12:18:02 PM

Bottleneck: a bottle is a container which has a relatively large capacity, and then has a narrow neck that keeps that capacity contained to prevent the user from pouring the whole bottle out at the same time. This is very useful in a bottle as it serves it's function. In computers though, it means that there is wasted potential.

As an example:
Lets say that you want to play a video game. The first step is to load the game, which means that the OS (which lives in Ram) needs to tell the HDD to load all resources associated with said game into memory. The Ram can receive and send data at several GB/s, where as a HDD can only send said data at 80-100MB/s.
The Ram then is being held back (bottlenecked) by the HDD. This is where SSDs, which their much lower seek time and higher throughput help loading times so much, because it brings your practical throughput much closer to the potential throughput of the fastest device.

When playing a game you are then dividing your processing resources between the CPU and GPU. Graphical components are processed on the GPU, while the databases, AI, and other important game mechanics are processed with the CPU. If the CPU is too low, then the GPU cannot get the information it needs in order to display the next frame on the monitor. This can cause a huge and potentially fatal bottleneck for a game, and seriously hold back the game from playable fps levels.

Obviously, the reality of bottlenecks is much more complicated than this, and there are several ways in which a bottleneck can occur, but the idea is that one part has the potential for x amount of performance, but then is being held back by a smaller amount of performance. Really there is no way to remove these issues entirely, but so long as the parts are in the same class, then it is not so much of an issue.
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