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$3000 Gaming build advice

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November 6, 2012 3:39:03 AM

Hey there people.
I'm planning on building me a gaming rig this coming december, and after doing some research on the web I came up with this build. Most of the parts I got them based on advice and reviews from Squidoo.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, specially when it comes to the display, as I kinda want to try out 3D but I'm not sure if I would be better off with a larger screen with bigger resolution.
Also, the case I chose comes with 4 fans, but I'm not quit sure if I'm still lacking on the cooling department.

Also, I'm not sure if this should go to New Build or Homebuilt.

Here are the specs:

Mobo:
ASUS Maximus V EXTREME LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard $369.00

Processor:
Intel Core i7-3770K Quad-Core Processor 3.5 GHz 8 MB Cache LGA 1155 - BX80637I73770K $319.99

GPU
VGA GeForce GTX680 SuperClocked 2048MB GDDR5, DVI, DVI-D, HDMI, DisplayPort, 4-way SLI Ready Graphics Card Graphics Cards 02G-P4-2682-KR $469.99

RAM
Corsair Vengeance Blue 16 GB DDR3 SDRAM Dual Channel Memory Kit CMZ16GX3M4A1600C9B $79.99

HDD
Western Digital Caviar Black 1 TB SATA III 7200 RPM 64 MB Cache Internal Desktop Hard Drive Bulk/OEM - WD1002FAEX $89.93

SDD
Samsung 830 - Series MZ-7PC128N/AM 128 GB 2.5 Inch SATA III MLC Internal SSD Laptop Kit with Norton Ghost 15 $89.99

Power supply
OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W Modular High Performance Power Supply compatible with Intel Sandy Bridge Core i3 i5 i7 and AMD Phenom $81.24

Case
Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced Full Tower Case with SuperSpeed USB 3.0 (RC-932-KKN5-GP) $149.99

Display
Asus VG278H 27-Inch 3D Full-HD LED Monitor with Integrated Stereo Speakers $589.73


Sound
Logitech Surround Sound Speaker System Z906 (980-000467) $337.53

Mouse
Mad Catz R.A.T. 9 Professional Wireless Gaming Mouse for PC and Mac $127.99

Keyboard
Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013 Elite Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (RZ03-00381900-R3U1) $139.99

Total $2,845.36
November 6, 2012 3:50:08 AM

Wow, you're overspending on alot of parts. Let me help ya out. Try this...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.77 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($189.98 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.93 @ Amazon)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($407.55 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced ATX Full Tower Case ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ CompUSA)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($698.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2375.12
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Use this as a base build and throw in whatever other bells and whistles you want. 3D monitors are extremely over hyped. I recommend you grab a monitor with a high resolution. Try the 2560x1440 IPS panel LED backlit monitor listed above.

Honestly, this build is still very overkill for gaming. If you don't plan on doing any video editing/rendering, you can knock the processor down a notch to the i5 3570k. They perform exactly the same in games.

If you have any questions regarding why I changed something, feel free to ask. Hope this helps; good luck!
November 6, 2012 4:06:44 AM

Thanks for the quick reply.
Now, I forgot to mention I need to get everything from Amazon as I live in Costa Rica and there's a courier on the US that forwards all of my packages here, and I really do trust Amazon's support and speed.
The display that you mentioned looks great, but when it comes to the GPU, and thinking of how well it will perform with future releases, wouldn't the GTX680 @ 2GB beat the GPU you mentioned? And, wouldn't I be missing PhysX on certain games, like Mafia and Borderlands?
Related resources
November 6, 2012 4:11:00 AM

Koga001 said:
Thanks for the quick reply.
Now, I forgot to mention I need to get everything from Amazon as I live in Costa Rica and there's a courier on the US that forwards all of my packages here, and I really do trust Amazon's support and speed.
The display that you mentioned looks great, but when it comes to the GPU, and thinking of how well it will perform with future releases, wouldn't the GTX680 @ 2GB beat the GPU you mentioned? And, wouldn't I be missing PhysX on certain games, like Mafia and Borderlands?


The 680 and 670 use the same GK109 processor and the 670 has a slightly higher VRAM clock speed. Do you have a store in your country that's not Amazon? If you don't know of one check the link in my signature. I definitely agree that a lot of those parts are way overkill for gaming.
November 6, 2012 4:27:30 AM

I'm actually quite tied to Amazon only.
Forgot to mention I want the PC for hardcore gaming, and that I'd rather stick with Intel and Nvidia.
November 6, 2012 5:21:07 AM

You don't want a 3D system. Gimmicy and doubles your graphics power required. Much better off with either a triple monitor setup or a large, high resolution setup. Check out this review:

http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/NVIDIA/GeForce_GTX_6...

As you can see, you will actually need two 670's in SLI for a 256X1600 display (or 2560X1440)

Go with a 3570K processor to free up $100. No difference in gaming. Use the cheaper motherboard too.

You can get a 27 inch 2560X1440 disply on Ebay "perfect pixel" for only $350:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Perfect-Pixel-27-Inch-LED-Qnix-...

And a "perfect pixel" 30 inch 2560X1600 monitor for only $780

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Perfect-Pixel-New-YAMAKASI-LEON...
November 6, 2012 5:45:49 AM

babernet_1 said:
As you can see, you will actually need two 670's in SLI for a 256X1600 display (or 2560X1440)


What? Why would you spend another $400 on a second GPU for that resolution? One card is perfectly fine. The thing that may change at this resolution is the need for VRAM, so I would either recommend getting a 7970 which has 3GB of VRAM and saving some money, or a gtx 670 with 4GB rather than 2.

The 7970 does outperform the 670 in a few games (and vice versa) thanks to the newest driver (12.11) which has been a godsend. However, both cards are neck and neck - I am not biasing either and love both NVidia and AMD. PhysX really isn't that special, but at this level you should choose whichever card you feel comfortable with! Whatever you prefer.

P.S. Do not buy a 680, the price:p erformance ratio on them is terrible compared to the 670 and 7970. Plus, these two cards can easily clock past a 680 with less power drawn.
November 6, 2012 6:23:01 AM

Yeah, uhm... surprised nobody has mentioned this before, but drop the i7. Games don't use the hyperthreading, which means for gaming, it's the EXACT same as an i5 with 100mhz higher core clock before overclocking, for $100 more.

Also, you don't have an aftermarket cooler mentioned. So... are you not going to overclock? Because getting that nice of a processor, especially an unlocked one, is silly if you aren't.

On that note, your motherboard is super duper overkill: buy a Gigabyte Z77X-UD3H or comparable ASUS motherboard. That'll be about $200 off, unless you REALLY want to run a server motherboard.

Don't buy a 680 - the 670 and 680, overclocked, reach the same performance. Again another wasted $100.

Since 8GB RAM is overkill for gaming, 16GB is pointless.

Good pick on the hard drive, but the SSD? "Internal SSD Laptop Kit with Norton Ghost 15"!? Get a Samsung 840 pro with a desktop mounting kit. You don't need Norton, nor do you want a laptop drive.

Decent pick on the power supply - personally I'd go with a Corsair HX750.

Your case is, again, overkill. Though it does have good cooling.

Good pick on the monitor - that'll last you a long time. (Though I would recommend using just the 120HZ in games and not the 3d. You'll have to buy a $400 glasses kit to use the 3d, and 120HZ is easier and nicer, in my opinion.)

Your sound is fine, if you want to blow it on that...

Your mouse and keyboard are overkill to a silly point. Don't buy a wireless mouse. It's worse than wired, and the batteries could die on you in the middle of a firefight. Get the RAT 7 or a different gaming mouse.

Razer makes cruddy product, but you did well going with a mechanical keyboard. (Don't know it was intentional, but...) Don't worry about getting a "gaming" keyboard, just get a good one that will last. I personally LOVE my completely blank Leopold with Cherry MX Browns.

If any of that makes no sense to you, ask me. I'll post a build that'll beat yours out for way cheaper in just a moment.
November 6, 2012 6:27:23 AM

There you go. Three monitors, extremely good performance, and crazy good peripherals. This will work WAY better than your original build.

http://pcpartpicker.com/p/mHD4

If you want a single, nicer monitor, do that. A single 670 or 7970 after overclocking should take care of it just fine.
November 6, 2012 6:29:49 AM

What if he got a 1440 or 1600P monitor?
November 6, 2012 9:22:17 AM

I hate myself for some reason now, but this sounds exactly like what you want:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.77 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($75.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.93 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.00 @ B&H)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($698.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2487.57
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
November 6, 2012 10:31:36 AM

willyroc said:
I hate myself for some reason now, but this sounds exactly like what you want:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.77 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($75.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.93 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($89.00 @ B&H)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($369.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Phantom 410 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($94.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: LG GH24NS90 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus PB278Q 27.0" Monitor ($698.95 @ B&H)
Total: $2487.57
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

i think he will like this overkill pc lol ( for me i would just pick the gtx 680 4gb edition )
November 6, 2012 12:29:48 PM

Koga001 said:
Hey there people.
I'm planning on building me a gaming rig this coming december, and after doing some research on the web I came up with this build. Most of the parts I got them based on advice and reviews from Squidoo.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated, specially when it comes to the display, as I kinda want to try out 3D but I'm not sure if I would be better off with a larger screen with bigger resolution.
Also, the case I chose comes with 4 fans, but I'm not quit sure if I'm still lacking on the cooling department.

Also, I'm not sure if this should go to New Build or Homebuilt.

Here are the specs:

Mobo:
ASUS Maximus V EXTREME LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard $369.00

Processor:
Intel Core i7-3770K Quad-Core Processor 3.5 GHz 8 MB Cache LGA 1155 - BX80637I73770K $319.99

GPU
VGA GeForce GTX680 SuperClocked 2048MB GDDR5, DVI, DVI-D, HDMI, DisplayPort, 4-way SLI Ready Graphics Card Graphics Cards 02G-P4-2682-KR $469.99

RAM
Corsair Vengeance Blue 16 GB DDR3 SDRAM Dual Channel Memory Kit CMZ16GX3M4A1600C9B $79.99

HDD
Western Digital Caviar Black 1 TB SATA III 7200 RPM 64 MB Cache Internal Desktop Hard Drive Bulk/OEM - WD1002FAEX $89.93

SDD
Samsung 830 - Series MZ-7PC128N/AM 128 GB 2.5 Inch SATA III MLC Internal SSD Laptop Kit with Norton Ghost 15 $89.99

Power supply
OCZ ModXStream Pro 700W Modular High Performance Power Supply compatible with Intel Sandy Bridge Core i3 i5 i7 and AMD Phenom $81.24

Case
Cooler Master HAF 932 Advanced Full Tower Case with SuperSpeed USB 3.0 (RC-932-KKN5-GP) $149.99

Display
Asus VG278H 27-Inch 3D Full-HD LED Monitor with Integrated Stereo Speakers $589.73


Sound
Logitech Surround Sound Speaker System Z906 (980-000467) $337.53

Mouse
Mad Catz R.A.T. 9 Professional Wireless Gaming Mouse for PC and Mac $127.99

Keyboard
Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013 Elite Mechanical Gaming Keyboard (RZ03-00381900-R3U1) $139.99

Total $2,845.36
That is a nice build i suggest getting an i5-3570k and a 670 instead of 680 the rest is fine. If you're going for overkill get two 670's and get a better power supply that is a budget PSU something you should not use on a high end builds. If you need help you can message me in private you're not going to get help here because the forum is more AMD bias and people will just try to force you to buy 7970 which is not right.It's your money and you should get what you like i noticed you mentioned you rather stick with intel and NVidia.If nobody helps you the right way just get at me.I will help you get the right things based on your needs/wants.As far as which monitor is for you all depends Response Rate


The response rate of an LCD monitor refers to how quickly each pixel on the screen can change color. The lower the response rate, the faster the screen updates. If you are playing fast-paced action game for example, where the images change quickly, if you're playing on a monitor with a slower response rate, you may experience what is known as "ghosting". Ghosting happens when the previous image displayed on the screen can still be seen as a blur for moments after the image has changed.


When choosing the best gaming monitor, the response rate is perhaps the single most important factor to consider. Ghosting and motion blur can ruin your overall gaming experience. The faster the response rate of your monitor, the less ghosting you will see.


I would say that an LCD with a response rate of 5ms is the minimum for gaming. Lower than 5ms is better of course (remember that the lower, the faster), and the very best gaming monitors on the market have extremely fast response rates such as 2ms and lower to avoid any ghosting/blur issues completely.



LED vs LCD Monitors


LED monitors are the exact same as LCD monitors, except they use LED backlighting which provides some advantages such as a brighter and sharper display, thinner screen, and lower power usage.


LED monitors currently cost a little more than a standard LCD, but if you want the best gaming monitor then I would definitely suggest you buy one. If not, a standard LCD monitor with a good response rate will do just fine.



What Size Monitor?


Ultimately, the size you go for is totally up to you and how much you're willing to spend. Obviously the larger the screen, the more expensive it will be, but for the best gaming monitor experience I would suggest at least 19", and go for a widescreen LCD if you can. Nothing beats gaming on a nice, decent-sized widescreen monitor.


If you want the most immersive gaming experience possible and you have the money to spend, go for a quality 23" or 24" screen, or even 25" and above. After gaming on such a massive screen you won't ever want to go back to a smaller screen!



Contrast Ratio


The contrast ratio of a monitor can be a helpful spec to generally compare picture quality between different monitors. In general, the higher the contrast ratio, the better the picture quality.


With high contrast ratios your screen can produce deeper black levels, which creates a more immersive and visually sharp experience. Keep in mind that the contrast ratio isn't always an accurate measure of image quality, so don't use it solely to compare two monitors as there's more to it than that.



Viewing Angle


If you look at an LCD monitor from an angle, you will notice that the image appears dimmer and the colors can look weird. At extreme angles the entire image can even disappear. The viewing angle of an LCD monitor is the angle at which you can still view the screen clearly, and is usually listed in the monitor's specifications list.


The greater the viewing angle, the better, but for gamers the viewing angle doesn't really matter because you are looking directly at the screen the whole time. But there are some people who will consider the viewing angle important, for example if you need to show presentations with your LCD monitor.



Matte vs Glossy Screens There are two kinds of modern LCD screens: matte (anti-glare) and glossy. Both have their pros and cons and are a subject of many discussions.


Matte screens don't get glare or reflections on them; however, the same rough surface (polarizer) that reduces the intensity of reflected light results in less contrast and brightness since the light from the LCD screen has to pass through it. Matte screens diffuse light instead of reflecting it so they might be easier to read outdoors, if the backlight provides enough brightness. You don't have to worry about reflections unlike with a glossy screen. One of the downsides of a strong anti-glare coating in matte displays is a grainy "crystalline" pattern which is mostly visible when viewing text on a white background.


Glossy screens have vibrant colors and high contrast and brightness because they have a smooth, high-gloss surface. As a result, it is often the choice for movies or gaming. However, strong lighting sources in the environment cause glare on these screens which is not only annoying, but can also cause eye strain and pain. If the lighting isn't adequate, you will also see distracting reflections on the screen. Some graphics designers may find the colors inaccurate, although that mostly depends on the LCD matrix. Glossy will work great for you if the lighting in your room doesn't create any glare on the screen. 120Hz
Why a 120Hz Refresh Rate Computer Monitor?
120Hz Vs. 60Hz
120 Hz vs. 60Hz Refresh Rate - Source: BenQBoth response time, the time it takes for a pixel to go from black to white and back again, and input lag, the difference in time that it takes for you to input a command into your computer and see it displayed, are very well-known terms in the gaming community. Few gamers think about the impact that a higher refresh rate will have on their game.


What is Refresh Rate?


Refresh rate is basically the amount of times in a second that a monitor will draw the data which it receives. Most TN and IPS panel monitors have a 60Hz refresh rate. In order to really see all the advantages that come with a 120Hz display you should be gaming at an FPS well above 60.


Benefits of 120Hz:


1. Details are more crisp and lifelike.
2. More Responsive
Great Gaming Monitors In No Certain Order

http://www.amazon.com/Samsung-S27A950D-27-Inch-Class-Mo...
http://www.amazon.com/Asus-VG278H-27-Inch-Integrated-Sp...
http://www.amazon.com/BenQ-XL2420T-Professional-Gaming-...
November 6, 2012 2:05:10 PM

My advice is spend less and send me the difference.
November 6, 2012 3:17:18 PM

That's a lotta money and for $2k you could build something that performs very close tot he 43k box. But who am I to stand between a man and his dreams :) 

Case / PSU ($245) - HAF is a bit "long in the tooth and OCZ PSU's just don't cut it

Corsair 500R is a killer $140 case (see reviews at tweaktown and benchmarkreviews.com) that you can now buy for $80. The HX850 PSU gets a 10.0 rating from jonnyguru and outperforms the newer AX850 in terms of ripple and voltage stability.
$80 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$165 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Though, with $3,000 to spend, the features in the Level 10 GT are hard to ignore. And if aesthetics is important, the matching case, KB, Mouse, headset, headset rack that come with the case make a real impressive looking desktop. The case door feature whereby ya dont have to mess with fan cables when removing side panel is worth $75 to me alone.

$400 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

MoBo / CPU - Don't see what ya getting with the Extreme. For $30 less you could get x16 x16 graphics bandwidth with the Asus P8Z77 WS. Next step down would be the Sabertooth and

3770k w/ Asus P8Z77 WS - $640 price includes $20 combo savings
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

3770k w/ Asus P8Z77 Sabertooth - $545 price includes $15 combo savings
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

However, I didn't see that as being worth the investment as I saw nothing in ya post that warrants hyperthreading and therefore have to recommend the 3570k w/ the Z77 pro at $390 w/ a $30 combo savings.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...

Given the small performance differences, I still have a hard time recommending the 680's. The difference between the 670 DCII and DCII TOP was handpicked GPUs, but as the line matured, Asus has found this step unnecessary and we are seeing OC's well over 1300 Mhz

TOP Review
http://www.techpowerup.com/reviews/ASUS/GeForce_GTX_670...

non TOP OC @ 1357 Mhz .... will ya get that high ? Doubtful, but 1280+ is very likely
http://www.pneumatictoolsonline.com/1080.jpg
http://hardforum.com/showthread.php?t=1696144&page=2

2GB $400 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
4GB $460 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

use the latter if ya using multiple screens

SSD / HD - With $3k budget, I'd upgrade to faster / bigger SSD (240 GB Chronos Deluxe) and HD (Barracuda XT)

$200 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
$156 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Cooler - the Noc DH-14 and Phanteks trade wind in the thermal tests but the Phanteks 5 year warranty outclasses the Noc's 1 year and the Noc's aesthetics are just plain fugly whereas the Phanteks is available in multiple color schemes.

So even going with the extravagant Case, KB, Mouse, heasdet combo, 2 GFX cards and a 3D kit, I'm at $2950. The twin 670's are 70% faster than the single 680.

Case Combo - $400 - Thermaltake Level 10 GT Snow w/ KB, Mouse, headset http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Case Fan - $8 - Thermaltake Blue120 mm http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
PSU - $165 - Corsair HX850 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
MoBo - $390 - ASUS P8Z77 Pro w/ 3570k http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?Ite...
CPU - incl - Intel Core i7-3570k Included w/ MoBo
Cooler / TIM - $90 - Phanteks PH-TC14PE http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
RAM - $85 - (2 x 8GB) Muskin Blackline DDR3 1600 CAS 7 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GFX - $460 - Asus GTX 670 DCII 4GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
GFX - $460 - Asus GTX 670 DCII 4GB same
HD - $200 - Seagate Barracuda XT 2TB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
SSD - $165 - Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240 GB http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
DVD Writer w/ BR - $55 - Asus Model BW-12B1ST/BLK/G/AS http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Monitor $330 ASUS VG236H Black 23" http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Monitor Later ASUS VG236H Black 23" Same
Monitor Later ASUS VG236H Black 23" Same
Keyboard - incl Tt eSPORTS Mega G1 Included w/ Case
Mouse - incl Gaming Mouse Included w/ Case
Headphones - incl Shock Gaming Headset Included w/ Case
3D Kit incl nVidia Vision 2 3D Glasses http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
OS - $140 - Win 7-64 Home Professional http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Total $2,948

The 3D 120 Hz monitors are outta stock at the moment on newegg .... Asus has new model about to pop so dunno if newegg will restock. The Acer equivalent is $378

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As for 3D, I have to say I don't like 3D movies and after the 1st 5 minutes playing Batman AC I was about to toss the things. But after 10 minutes I found the PhyX and 3D quite impressive. It's one of those things though that doesn't quite hit y as much when ya turn it on than it does by what ya miss when ya turn it off.
November 6, 2012 3:55:01 PM

2795507,8,1417117Good pick on the monitor - that'll last you a long time. (Though I would recommend using just the 120HZ in games and not the 3d. You'll have to buy a $400 glasses kit to use the 3d, and 120HZ is easier and nicer, in my opinion.)[/quotemsg said:


The monitor comes with the entire 3D kit
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
ASUS VG Series VG278H Black 27" 2ms HDMI Swivel & Height Adjustable Widescreen LED Backlight LCD 3D 120Hz Monitor 300 cd/m2 ASCR 50,000,000:1 w/ 3D glasses and speakers
NVIDIA 3D Vision,Glasses Included,3D LightBoost,ARR


And if bought separately, its only $128
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Quote:
You don't need Norton, nor do you want a laptop drive
.

The laptop "kit" is packaged with the drive. The only difference between the SSD's is the mounting hardware which, agreed, he doesn't need.
November 6, 2012 4:08:06 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Though, with $3,000 to spend, the features in the Level 10 GT are hard to ignore. And if aesthetics is important, the matching case, KB, Mouse, headset, headset rack that come with the case make a real impressive looking desktop. The case door feature whereby ya dont have to mess with fan cables when removing side panel is worth $75 to me alone.



Ugh, I wouldn't touch the Level 10 or the Sabertooth with a 10 foot pole. The Level 10 is ugly, and the plastic covers on the Sabertooth actually trap more heat than they prevent according to most of the reviews I've read. If you've got $3K to blow on a system I'd go for a Switch 810 or Cosmos II.
November 6, 2012 4:20:05 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Ugh, I wouldn't touch the Level 10 or the Sabertooth with a 10 foot pole. The Level 10 is ugly, and the plastic covers on the Sabertooth actually trap more heat than they prevent according to most of the reviews I've read. If you've got $3K to blow on a system I'd go for a Switch 810 or Cosmos II.
:lol:  i agree that is one ugly case and the sabertooth is for looks not performance it might be a dust trap to
November 6, 2012 4:23:26 PM

ram1009 said:
My advice is spend less and send me the difference.

hahahaa nice advice :sol: 
November 6, 2012 4:45:52 PM

You posted a ton of great info but I would like to clarify a few things for readers who might not have delved further into things.

bigcyco1 said:
.As far as which monitor is for you all depends Response Rate .....When choosing the best gaming monitor, the response rate is perhaps the single most important factor to consider. Ghosting and motion blur can ruin your overall gaming experience. The faster the response rate of your monitor, the less ghosting you will see.


1. Response rate is a critical factor but it must be recognized that "advertised response rate" can not be relied upon. Always use review sites which test this and present the "real" numbers. One of the best I have found is here:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/

In general I find that quality manufacturers understate their specs while the budget guys greatly overstate them.

Quote:
Ghosting happens when the previous image displayed on the screen can still be seen as a blur for moments after the image has changed.


2. Ghosting - Scroll down here for a good picture of this phenomenon on the BenQ model you listed ... the review is very positive BTW.

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/benq_xl2420t.htm

Quote:
Ultimately, the size you go for is totally up to you and how much you're willing to spend. Obviously the larger the screen, the more expensive it will be, but for the best gaming monitor experience I would suggest at least 19", and go for a widescreen LCD if you can. Nothing beats gaming on a nice, decent-sized widescreen monitor.


3. Monitor Size - Bigger is better but when ya go bigger, it's well advised to increase resolution therewith. Size does have to take a back seat to resolution as, all things being equal, a 23" 1920 x 1080 monitor will look better than a 27" 1920 x 1080 monitor. The human eye can see individual pixels at normal viewing distances at about 96 pixels per inch .... at lower numbers, you will start to see individual pixels and the screen will look "grainy".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot_pitch

In the link above, we see that a 1920 x 1080 resolution a 23" screen gives ya 95.8 ppi whereas on a 27" screen, it's only a rather paltry 81.6 ppi. So if moving to 27" or above, I'd strongly recommend 2560×1440 or 2560×1600 unless you sit further back than normal viewing distances of 18 - 30" or have vision less then 20/20

Quote:
The contrast ratio of a monitor can be a helpful spec to generally compare picture quality between different monitors. In general, the higher the contrast ratio, the better the picture quality.


3. Contrast ratio - Again, advertised contrast ratios and tested ratios can two very different things so do ya research.

Quote:
The greater the viewing angle, the better, but for gamers the viewing angle doesn't really matter because you are looking directly at the screen the whole time. But there are some people who will consider the viewing angle important, for example if you need to show presentations with your LCD monitor.


Viewing Ange - IPS panels have better viewing angles but tend to look "flat" compared to TN panels. This can be an issue in triple monitor setups and is one reason why the side panels are often angled to the user.

Quote:
120 Hz vs. 60Hz Refresh Rate - Source: BenQBoth response time, the time it takes for a pixel to go from black to white and back again, and input lag, the difference in time that it takes for you to input a command into your computer and see it displayed, are very well-known terms in the gaming community. Few gamers think about the impact that a higher refresh rate will have on their game.


While black to white to black is oft what manufacturer's advertise to the G2G or gray to gray response time which is considered a better indicator of monitor performance.

http://www.prad.de/en/monitore/shownews_faq402.html

Quote:
it is fair to say yet that grey-to-grey measurements are much closer to practical reality and thereby provide more insight on how a given panel actually performs in terms of responsiveness. Since b/w shifts bear the biggest change in contrast requiring the highest amount of voltage in order to align the liquid crystals, b/w shifts create a kind of ideal condition which is usually rarely seen in practice. Everyday use rather means varying colors and lots of grey scales, where there are differences in contrast to be dealt with that are much less pronounced than it is the case in b/w shifts. This, however, asks for smaller voltages impressed for aligning the liquid crystals, as well. And less voltage means there is less energy for the crystals to align by. Therefore, low grey-to-grey response times are closer to practical reality than low black/white response times.


As for the 120Hz recommendation, I couldn't agree more. I have a $275 120Hz monitor upstairs next to a $600 Dell IPS monitor and while the IPS panel is far superior for photo retouching, it lacks the crispness, responsiveness and detail of the TN 120Hz panel in gaming at half the price.
November 6, 2012 4:55:13 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
You posted a ton of great info but I would like to clarify a few things for readers who might not have delved further into things.



1. Response rate is a critical factor but it must be recognized that "advertised response rate" can not be relied upon. Always use review sites which test this and present the "real" numbers. One of the best I have found is here:

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/

In general I find that quality manufacturers understate their specs while the budget guys greatly overstate them.

Quote:
Ghosting happens when the previous image displayed on the screen can still be seen as a blur for moments after the image has changed.


2. Ghosting - Scroll down here for a good picture of this phenomenon on the BenQ model you listed ... the review is very positive BTW.

http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/reviews/benq_xl2420t.htm

Quote:
Ultimately, the size you go for is totally up to you and how much you're willing to spend. Obviously the larger the screen, the more expensive it will be, but for the best gaming monitor experience I would suggest at least 19", and go for a widescreen LCD if you can. Nothing beats gaming on a nice, decent-sized widescreen monitor.


3. Monitor Size - Bigger is better but when ya go bigger, it's well advised to increase resolution therewith. Size does have to take a back seat to resolution as, all things being equal, a 23" 1920 x 1080 monitor will look better than a 27" 1920 x 1080 monitor. The human eye can see individual pixels at normal viewing distances at about 96 pixels per inch .... at lower numbers, you will start to see individual pixels and the screen will look "grainy".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dot_pitch

In the link above, we see that a 1920 x 1080 resolution a 23" screen gives ya 95.8 ppi whereas on a 27" screen, it's only a rather paltry 81.6 ppi. So if moving to 27" or above, I'd strongly recommend 2560×1440 or 2560×1600 unless you sit further back than normal viewing distances of 18 - 30" or have vision less then 20/20

Quote:
The contrast ratio of a monitor can be a helpful spec to generally compare picture quality between different monitors. In general, the higher the contrast ratio, the better the picture quality.


3. Contrast ratio - Again, advertised contrast ratios and tested ratios can two very different things so do ya research.

Quote:
The greater the viewing angle, the better, but for gamers the viewing angle doesn't really matter because you are looking directly at the screen the whole time. But there are some people who will consider the viewing angle important, for example if you need to show presentations with your LCD monitor.


Viewing Ange - IPS panels have better viewing angles but tend to look "flat" compared to TN panels. This can be an issue in triple monitor setups and is one reason why the side panels are often angled to the user.

Quote:
120 Hz vs. 60Hz Refresh Rate - Source: BenQBoth response time, the time it takes for a pixel to go from black to white and back again, and input lag, the difference in time that it takes for you to input a command into your computer and see it displayed, are very well-known terms in the gaming community. Few gamers think about the impact that a higher refresh rate will have on their game.


While black to white to black is oft what manufacturer's advertise to the G2G or gray to gray response time which is considered a better indicator of monitor performance.

http://www.prad.de/en/monitore/shownews_faq402.html

Quote:
it is fair to say yet that grey-to-grey measurements are much closer to practical reality and thereby provide more insight on how a given panel actually performs in terms of responsiveness. Since b/w shifts bear the biggest change in contrast requiring the highest amount of voltage in order to align the liquid crystals, b/w shifts create a kind of ideal condition which is usually rarely seen in practice. Everyday use rather means varying colors and lots of grey scales, where there are differences in contrast to be dealt with that are much less pronounced than it is the case in b/w shifts. This, however, asks for smaller voltages impressed for aligning the liquid crystals, as well. And less voltage means there is less energy for the crystals to align by. Therefore, low grey-to-grey response times are closer to practical reality than low black/white response times.


As for the 120Hz recommendation, I couldn't agree more. I have a $275 120Hz monitor upstairs next to a $600 Dell IPS monitor and while the IPS panel is far superior for photo retouching, it lacks the crispness, responsiveness and detail of the TN 120Hz panel in gaming at half the price.
Reading up on all this now and yeah i agree 120Hz is the way to go i have a BenQ XL2420TX Professional Gaming Monitor i didn't pay for it though i traded a friend some things for it :D 
November 6, 2012 6:20:44 PM

DarkSable said:
Yeah, uhm... surprised nobody has mentioned this before, but drop the i7. Games don't use the hyperthreading, which means for gaming, it's the EXACT same as an i5 with 100mhz higher core clock before overclocking, for $100 more.

Yeah, uhm...I actually already mentioned this before. Maybe you should have read my entire post. :lol: 

I didn't put the i5 3570k in my primary build suggestion simply because his budget could afford the 3770k. He may find it useful if he ever finds himself working with videos. He may wanna render some videos for youtube or something. Who knows...
November 6, 2012 7:50:00 PM

Great, thanks for the advice people.

Here's I couple of thinks I've thought:

1. When it comes to the GTX 670 vs GTX 680, several people said that an overclocked 670 will very well match a GTX 680, but still, an overclocked 670 can only do so much. If I were to get a GTX 680, it would right out of the box match an overclocked 670, and in case I'm into overclocking it in a near future, and overclocked 680 would totally beat an overclocked 670, wouldn't it?3

2. When comparing an i5 3570k vs an i7 3770k, as most of you have stated, the hyperthreading won't do any good to gaming as games don't use it, but it also wouldn't hurt it, would it? And even still, in a couple of years, the i7 will outperform the i5 on most tasks, apart from gaming, am I right?

I bring this up mainly because since I'm doing such a big investment, I want the build to keep up wit the tech requirements of the games and software for as long as possible, and if spending $400 extra on stuff that might seem "overkill" right now assures that the system will be up to date for an extra year or two, I really don't mind.

Now, still talking about the display, any large screens with big resolutions and high refresh rate and response time, that are around $500 - $600 that you can recommend me?
November 6, 2012 8:04:40 PM

On your question about high res monitor only ones i know of that are good go for $800 and up one good one is Dell UltraSharp U2711.The U2711 from Dell is quite expensive still. If you want a 27", 2560x1440 screens there a couple for about $800 you can research. NCIX has links (there's about three), an Asus, Samsung and another one I think.
November 6, 2012 10:55:35 PM

Koga001 said:
Great, thanks for the advice people.

Here's I couple of thinks I've thought:

1. When it comes to the GTX 670 vs GTX 680, several people said that an overclocked 670 will very well match a GTX 680, but still, an overclocked 670 can only do so much. If I were to get a GTX 680, it would right out of the box match an overclocked 670, and in case I'm into overclocking it in a near future, and overclocked 680 would totally beat an overclocked 670, wouldn't it?3

2. When comparing an i5 3570k vs an i7 3770k, as most of you have stated, the hyperthreading won't do any good to gaming as games don't use it, but it also wouldn't hurt it, would it? And even still, in a couple of years, the i7 will outperform the i5 on most tasks, apart from gaming, am I right?

I bring this up mainly because since I'm doing such a big investment, I want the build to keep up wit the tech requirements of the games and software for as long as possible, and if spending $400 extra on stuff that might seem "overkill" right now assures that the system will be up to date for an extra year or two, I really don't mind.

Now, still talking about the display, any large screens with big resolutions and high refresh rate and response time, that are around $500 - $600 that you can recommend me?


1. Hard to say - that's definitely more of a driver issue than anything else. Could it? Sure, but that depends on a huge number of factors - your cooling, your motherboard, things of that nature. I'm not going to say an overclocked 670 could beat a 680 - I will say it might be possible, but that all depends on your configuration.

2. It won't hurt to have hyperthreading but then again you won't use it and most likely won't use it for several years to come. Games are now just catching up to quad core technology - it will be years before it catches up to multi threading, hex and octo core CPUs. If you want to invest that money - put it in the GPU or elsewhere, like case or storage.

3. It's only overkill if it doesn't hurt or limit expansion options. Sure it helps to have more than less on a lot of occasions but you don't want to skimp either. That's what I'm trying to say.

Quote:
:lol:  i agree that is one ugly case and the sabertooth is for looks not performance it might be a dust trap to http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-laughing025.g...


And you know what Asus did to address users' concerns about the heat issues? Include two cheaply made 80mm fans, which just circulate the heat trapped underneath the thermal armor. That's a fail if you ask me. :lol: 
November 6, 2012 11:54:13 PM

This




November 7, 2012 8:40:42 AM

There are 27" screens on eBay for 300-400 dollars. Risky though, but most people seem to be happy
!