Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Can I use my laptop to monitor temps in game from my Desktop?

Tags:
  • Laptops
  • Desktops
  • Monitors
  • Windows 7
  • Product
Last response: in Windows 7
Share
February 20, 2012 5:46:26 AM

And to top it off and make it even more impossible I'd like to do it wirelessly.

My desktop's hooked up to a TV and I sit about 8ft away from it. I'd like to keep the laptop next to me an monitor the temps while playing games.

The only way I can imagine successfully doing this is using remote desktop while using the laptop as a second monitor.

I'm using Windows 7 x64.

Should I just give up and gtfo?

...

It doesn't seem entirely impossible because I used to do it with my iPad... but I sold it.

More about : laptop monitor temps game desktop

a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2012 9:23:10 AM

Any chance your desktop has a Gigabyte motherboard?
http://www.gigabyte.com/microsite/208/cloud-oc.html

But the basic problem is that you want to see, what happened during playing. So if you use a monitor software which draws graphs, you can see the previous temperature values after you quit the game. Is that not good enough?
m
0
l
February 20, 2012 4:23:27 PM

szaboaz said:
Any chance your desktop has a Gigabyte motherboard?
http://www.gigabyte.com/microsite/208/cloud-oc.html

But the basic problem is that you want to see, what happened during playing. So if you use a monitor software which draws graphs, you can see the previous temperature values after you quit the game. Is that not good enough?


Not a fan of Gigabyte. I did but it was a RMA. Current board's a EVGA.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
m
0
l
February 20, 2012 4:25:36 PM

szaboaz said:
Any chance your desktop has a Gigabyte motherboard?
http://www.gigabyte.com/microsite/208/cloud-oc.html

But the basic problem is that you want to see, what happened during playing. So if you use a monitor software which draws graphs, you can see the previous temperature values after you quit the game. Is that not good enough?


Oh sorry, and to answer the question... I guess it's good enough but when you have other resources laying around why not use them... if it's possible?
m
0
l
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2012 4:36:05 PM

flossbandit said:
Oh sorry, and to answer the question... I guess it's good enough but when you have other resources laying around why not use them... if it's possible?


Absolutely. It's cool. Why don't you write one.


First, we need a program, which gets the thermal data once in every x seconds, and writes it into a file. Maybe already there is a program like that around.

Next, install a webserver on the desktop machine (apache, simple).

Have the monitor program save the file into the shared directory.

Finally, write a client, which asks the webserver every x seconds for the current values. Little Javascript.

;-)
m
0
l
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2012 4:43:18 PM

And even the webserver is unnecessary. A simple Windows shared directory between the two machines would do. But then the client has to be a standalone app, not a web app.
m
0
l
a b D Laptop
a b C Monitor
a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2012 4:50:15 PM

Or just run HWmonitor which will record high and low temps without monitoring it. Just a thought.
m
0
l
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
February 20, 2012 5:17:31 PM

I find this topic interesting, so I went and checked out, what EVGA has to offer in terms of hardware monitoring.

First, I've found this http://www.evga.com/eleet/ among the downloadable stuff for your motherboard.

And as I looked at the screenshots, one of them says "Poll HWMonitor to EVBot". What is that EVBot? http://www.evga.com/articles/00521/ Not bad... :)  Not your laptop, though...
m
0
l
February 20, 2012 6:47:10 PM

I've got ELEET and I'd call it a more in-depth version of CPU-Z. It even has a CUPID watermark in the bottom right corner.

HWMonitor's what I primarily use to monitor temps though. I'd keep that, ELEET or CPU-Z, and (Windows) Resource Monitor on the laptop if I could.

BTW that EVBot thing's pretty cool. I had no idea you could OC with hardware. I wouldn't call myself an "extreme" OC enthusiast though.

BUT could this be what I'm taking about? I'm really not sure. He's using an Ethernet cable, which doesn't make a lot of difference.

...kids these days:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GW0AN9N0QB4
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 12:42:01 PM

I know my asus board has ROG connect, which allows you to connect an ipad and monitor temps and overclock instantly while gaming, but unfortunatly, this is not a wirless option -unless- you found a wireless usb reciever to plug into the computer and the ipad adaptor... HMMMMMMM now this sounds possible
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 1:39:23 PM

thespieler said:
I know my asus board has ROG connect, which allows you to connect an ipad and monitor temps and overclock instantly while gaming, but unfortunatly, this is not a wirless option -unless- you found a wireless usb reciever to plug into the computer and the ipad adaptor... HMMMMMMM now this sounds possible


I used an app called Air Display & it really has nothing to do with the mobo - just Windows 7.

Doesn't support aero though... which kind of sucks so it'd change your entire scheme when connected.

After I bought that one (for $9.99) I ended up finding a free one called DisplayLink - get on it. The color's a little blotchier though.

Both were laggy as hell and totally impractical for normal dual monitor use but they did actually work quite nicely for just monitoring the temps (with nothing really moving on the screen)

It's also obviously gonna work if your computer has WiFi... internal or dongle really makes no difference.
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 2:47:02 PM

what about using a remote desktop like application, like logmein remote, i think you can get lots of system parameters displayed. its free for 30days.
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 5:08:45 PM

Might be worth a look, but a free program used by IT professionals called SPICEWORKS allows you to monitor pc's connected to your network. With a little tweaking you can get it to show lots of information on your systems, and any computer on your network can access it. best of all the program is free, I use it here at work (systems admin's apprentice)
m
0
l
February 21, 2012 5:25:39 PM

Wait. Are we totally over thinking this?

When you're using Remote Desktop can you:

1) use the computer A while you're accessing it with computer B?

2) open different programs than what's open on computer A through B?

If you could, you could just keep your temp/performance apps running in the background and minimize the games on the laptop...

I haven't tried this but it's definitely worth a shot when I get off work...
m
0
l
February 22, 2012 4:08:29 PM

1) is possible

2) Depends on application

If your talking about offloading applications from your gaming machine and running them off another remotely connected computer, then no, this is not possible.
m
0
l
a b D Laptop
a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2012 6:43:34 PM

If you haven't seen this one yet, check it out:
http://www.missingremote.com/guide/how-enable-concurren...

Be sure to take the time and read at least some of the recent comments. It seems to working for some, but troublesome for others...

But it promises exactly the thing you want: one user is logged into the workstation directly, rocking away with the gaming, while another user (or even the same works for some, but if another works, I think it's fine) logs into the workstation from the laptop without affecting the direct user's session, and have a full-featured session of his own, so he can run the monitor software as he pleases.

It involves patching, so exact version matches, and backup copies of affected files are a must.
m
0
l
!