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Is 32GB too much RAM?

Last response: in Systems
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How Much RAM do YOU have?

Total: 23 votes (4 blank votes)

  • 2GB
  • 0 %
  • 4GB
  • 22 %
  • 8GB
  • 48 %
  • 16GB
  • 16 %
  • 32GB
  • 11 %
  • 64GB
  • 6 %
November 6, 2012 9:25:49 PM

As I contemplate adding more RAM, should I go with 32GB while I'm at?

More about : 32gb ram

a c 136 B Homebuilt system
November 6, 2012 9:28:53 PM

yes to the title

no to the question in the thread
a b B Homebuilt system
November 6, 2012 9:29:14 PM

You need to explain what the system usage is for. For a basic system, 4GB should be more than enough. For a gaming system, 8 GB should be more than enough. Unless you're running a server that runs multiple Virtual Machines or working with large graphics/media files, I don't see any reason to go above 8GB of RAM in any system.

-Wolf sends
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November 6, 2012 9:46:02 PM

The system is my main rig used for storing videos and music. However, if Windows 7 doesn't load before the logo finishes, it's slow.
a c 136 B Homebuilt system
November 6, 2012 9:55:25 PM

more RAM will not help windows load faster

using msconfig to stop programs automatically starting will

and so could adding an SSD as a boot drive

For the usage you describe you probably wont ever use more than 4 gig of RAM . Ever
November 6, 2012 9:58:07 PM

I have a OCZ Vertex 4. I need to upgrade my cpu.
a c 136 B Homebuilt system
November 6, 2012 10:04:39 PM

ahthurungnone said:
I have a OCZ Vertex 4. I need to upgrade my cpu.


your sig also says you have 32 gig of RAM ....and according to this thread .........you dont
a b B Homebuilt system
November 6, 2012 10:09:21 PM

Quote:
For the usage you describe you probably wont ever use more than 4 gig of RAM . Ever


^----- +1

-Wolf sends
November 6, 2012 10:11:08 PM

The question is flawed. No amount of ram is "too much".

If someone says here's a computer, you have your choice of 16gb or 32gb. Everything else is exactly the same including PRICE. Everybody would take the 32gb one.

What the real question is is it worth spending an extra $100 to get to 32gb of ram.

So the question(s) would be the form of

How much would you pay to go from 16gb to 32gb?
-no amount, I wouldn't spend a penny, it's completely useless (the teaparty answer)
-$1
-$10
-$50
-$100 (market price)

etc etc.


Probably need to ask the same question for 4->8gb, and 8->16gb
November 6, 2012 11:21:48 PM

I went ahead and bought 32GB of RAM since Newegg offered a 20% discount.
November 6, 2012 11:26:50 PM

Well congrats. You just future-proofed your computer for the next 10 years.
a b B Homebuilt system
November 6, 2012 11:28:21 PM

Quote:
The system is my main rig used for storing videos and music. However, if Windows 7 doesn't load before the logo finishes, it's slow.

Quote:
more RAM will not help windows load faster

using msconfig to stop programs automatically starting will

and so could adding an SSD as a boot drive

For the usage you describe you probably wont ever use more than 4 gig of RAM . Ever


Based on this, I'd say you just wasted even more money. If you want Windows to load faster, you need a better processor and/or a Solid State Drive for the operating system.

-Wolf sends
March 3, 2014 8:20:20 AM

i agree with outlander.......ram wont help you load windows faster. You need SSD for system and keep dino HHD for other stuff or install another SSD for other stuff to be faster too. In my opinion 8GB of good ram should be enough for gaming, unless you are fancy photo or image editor or maker then 16 will be enough.
a b B Homebuilt system
March 3, 2014 8:46:26 AM

It all depends on what you do with your rig...most don't have a need for 32GB or more, but many do....Wasn't that long ago everyone said 2GB was more than you will ever use, then 4GB just a couple years back, and now many saying 8GB....Generally in the past you could look at prebuilts and get an idea as they generally would be low DRAM wise compared to what enthusiasts, gamers and heavy users wanted, yet today, most prebuilts come with 6-8GB, even low end rigs.
April 21, 2014 2:00:57 PM

In the next couple of years 16 GB will probably be the "sweet spot". I usually like over doing it. I know that 16 GB is more then enough for the next 5 years, but I went with 32 GB because I could, and I can easily afford it.
a b B Homebuilt system
April 21, 2014 2:17:41 PM

16GB is rapidly headed towards being the entry level point, (prob within a 1 year-year and a half
May 22, 2014 2:37:48 AM

8 Gb is overkill for budget PCs as 4 are way more than enough even for windows 8.1 which requires 2gb minimum.

DDR3 prices are still high for budget PCs and there are no typical applications (even flash heavy games) that will require so much ram.

The only reason to have 32GB now is to make a ram disk. Ramdisks like AMD's are simple and awesome and preload at boot, best solution for ultra heavy applications. Me as a gamer solved some micro-stuttering i had with the ramdisk on games like Diablo 3 , World of Tanks and others.

If you want to be smart and if you intend to keep your PC for over 2 years from now, buy 8GB modules, 1 now, 1 later and 2 even later to get to 32gb when it will be needed..perhaps never or well in 8 years. But who will be using old DDR3 memory and such an old PC for gaming or heavy use then?

The best solution to deciding RAM for your machine is twofold
1) Decide what module you will place, sure 4x 1gb is fine but you will have to replace them all 4 if you want an upgrade.
2) Will your motherboard support a way stronger CPU? If yes, sure, get that 8GB module x1 or x2 or x4 because in few years you will just replace your i5 with a used i7 and be ok for some time .

However, dont buy 32GB (which has a price tag near a good discrete gpu card or a good soundcard etc) now, if you will upgrade to a new PC in 4 years with DDR4 ram...all that ram will go to waste.
May 22, 2014 2:45:54 AM

Tradesman1 said:
16GB is rapidly headed towards being the entry level point, (prob within a 1 year-year and a half


The 'entry level' point will likely remain 8GB for 2-3 more years at least, considering the PS3/360 held PC games back to 4GB for 5+ years longer than necessary. 64-bit operating systems have been around for a decade, and only in the last couple years have they started being a requirement. Many games still only recommend 4GB.

Most games, barring high end titles like the Witcher 4 or whatever they're on in a few years, will be made to run on high settings with 8GB of RAM for another 3-ish years based on the console precedent.

Ofc, a couple games already recommend 8GB. But you can't look at the top 1% of graphically stunning games and call that "entry level".

DDR4 will be mainstream before 32GB is needed, I'm nearly certain of that. So unfortunately, the people who buy 32GB of DDR3 RAM for anything other than professional rendering just wasted a lot of money and they'll never see returns in performance from it.
May 22, 2014 3:42:44 AM

To be honest I went with 16gb because I prefer bigger numbers..

I've never even hit 8gb yet, even while playing BF4 for example. (I have no interesting editing or other specific RAM tasks).
a b B Homebuilt system
May 22, 2014 8:35:19 AM

If even giving thought to 32GB would suggest getting 16GB anyway, above one mentions get 8 and add 8 later, which isn't that good of an idea as mixing DRAM, even the same exact sets can be problematic - the forums are full of people that have taken that advice and found that the mixed sets won't play together. Another thing to keep in mind is that DDR3 prices have been climbing (notably due to the fire that destroyed the Hynix IC manufacturing plant late last year, and yet while they are back to about full production, prices are really dropping any, due to DRAM manufacturers gearing up for production of DDR4. You might remember how DDR2 prices went up when DDR3 was introduced. Can expect to see DDR, DDR2 and yes DDR3 go up when DDR4 comes out and it will initially be at a premium
May 26, 2014 1:51:14 AM

I'm contemplating the same dilemma.

But, I want to use it for running multiple vm's in the background. Because that's what I do for a job.

So 16GB may not be enough for my needs.

I have 12GB now and when I have my lab running, I more of less max out. An extra 4GB will only allow me to add a couple of more machines and give me little headroom.

24GB would be about right. But, if I can get 32GB now then I may as well just do it.

May 26, 2014 2:45:41 AM

BreadWhistle said:
Well congrats. You just future-proofed your computer for the next 10 years.


I bet the full 32GB doesn't get used before DDR4 gets main stream.
May 26, 2014 4:32:08 AM

leeb2013 said:
BreadWhistle said:
Well congrats. You just future-proofed your computer for the next 10 years.


I bet the full 32GB doesn't get used before DDR4 gets main stream.


Yep. That's generally how I respond to these sorts of stupid "future proofing" attempts. For video editing, VMs, RAM disks, etc, 32GB could actually be useful. But not for gaming. For gaming it was just a pointless waste.

"Oh, you got an FX-8320? That's nice. Too bad it'll be too weak to play games before most games use 8 cores."

"Got 2 GTX 690s in SLI? Heh. Your sheer processing power is good for 7 years, just like you wanted. Too bad your VRAM is out of date next year."

"32GB of DDR3 RAM? Well, enjoy losing out to 16GB DDR4 in two years."
a b B Homebuilt system
May 26, 2014 9:31:56 AM

From the sounds of it, with the VMs then go 32GB now, I have numerous clients that frequently exceed 24 GB, as do I, it's not that hard....
May 27, 2014 11:44:12 AM

Tradesman1 said:
From the sounds of it, with the VMs then go 32GB now, I have numerous clients that frequently exceed 24 GB, as do I, it's not that hard....


I'll be keeping it for another 5 years, and by then we will be talking about holding out for DDR5 at my next upgrade.

You will always be close to something else coming out whatever you do.
May 27, 2014 1:46:25 PM

This question was asked in 2012. But since a discussion is going on I will ignore that.

Rationale said:


Yep. That's generally how I respond to these sorts of stupid "future proofing" attempts. For video editing, VMs, RAM disks, etc, 32GB could actually be useful. But not for gaming. For gaming it was just a pointless waste.

"Oh, you got an FX-8320? That's nice. Too bad it'll be too weak to play games before most games use 8 cores."

"Got 2 GTX 690s in SLI? Heh. Your sheer processing power is good for 7 years, just like you wanted. Too bad your VRAM is out of date next year."

"32GB of DDR3 RAM? Well, enjoy losing out to 16GB DDR4 in two years."


I would like to +1 this. I have seen these situation happen since 2007-2008. Many people rushed to buy a quad core for their ultimate gaming rigs with an overkill(back then) 2 GB ram or 4 GB ram(600 mhz). And what happened? we are now in 2014, and now games and other things are just starting to use more than 2 cores, and they need a high clock speed. So those 2.2 ghz quads of old days never saw any usefulness. Same thing with the 8 cores now/32/64 GB ram.

I have a computer that boots faster than showing a windows logo. It cost me 400$. It has an ssd and one 8 GB ram on one slot(not a dual channel guy) It's all in the ssd... So for future reference... buy an ssd

May 28, 2014 2:36:54 AM

32GB is maybe too much, but 4GB is too little, even for an average user.

It does not take many web browsers, productivity/development/office tools running to fill up 4GB.

I have 4GB and have to shut down Visual Studio if I want to play any game, otherwise it will crash due to OOM.
May 30, 2014 2:44:12 AM

I currently have 12GB of Tri Channel Ram, and my version of Windows 8.1 consumes 3.3GB of that.

And that figure will rise, if I open IE, Photoshop and a couple of other apps.

I could get away with 8GB, but what if I wanted to run a VM or something else in the background?

I would advise most multitasking users to get a min of 16GB, or max out at 32GB if you are using multiple VMs like me.

That's why I have just purchased a 32GB kit.

Because I made the mistake in 2008 of only buying 6GB, and it wasn't long before I had to buy another 6GB.

It's all about how you use your PC.

16GB is enough for most Gamers.
8GB is enough for the average Home User.
32GB is a must for Hardcore Media and VM rigs.

This raises another question.

You can beat on about is 32GB RAM too much.

But what about, is a £600 - £2000 Graphic Card too much? I'm still using my 512MB HD Graphic card and it's fine for what I need.

May 31, 2014 9:22:07 PM

midi25 said:


This raises another question.

You can beat on about is 32GB RAM too much.

But what about, is a £600 - £2000 Graphic Card too much? I'm still using my 512MB HD Graphic card and it's fine for what I need.



I guess the conclusion is; it depends what you are using your PC for! If you are going to run something that takes up to 32GB RAM then get 32GB. But, if you're getting 32GB now in case something might use it in 4-5 years time (ie. future proofing), then it's a bit pointless as there will be bigger/better/cheaper RAM then.

The same applies to graphics cards. If the 512MB HD graphics card suits you, then that's all you need. If you want to run the latest AAA games on 3 monitors, >60fps, ultra settings, then you'll need a high end GPU, $500+
June 23, 2014 4:35:12 PM

the extra RAM can be used in Radeon RAM disk to make a drive out of it to load programs into. I use the extra RAM this way to run DAW software and VST plugins. Its actually pretty good and makes use of your memory in a great way. Give it a try
a b B Homebuilt system
June 23, 2014 5:09:06 PM

Go for it! Especially if planning to hold on for a few years as DRAM prices aren't going to drop, they've been rising and when DDR4 gets released will prob rise even more
!