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Problem with system power up

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November 9, 2012 9:59:59 PM

Hi,

So, I built my system about a month and half ago and everything has been running tip-top since I first turned it on. However, last week I added/installed a GPU and since then I get this strange issue when I turn on my computer.

Basically everything seems fine and the system boots to Windows just fine, and since the OS is on an SSD it usually boots in a matter of seconds. But every now and then when my desktop appears it's like it gets stuck. No weird stuff pops on the screen and it doesn't go BSOD, but I can't click stuff with my mouse and it won't let me use CtrlAltDelete. Basically, I have use the reset button or hard power it down and when it restarts I usually start it in safe mode and restart from that and everything seems to work fine, but every now and then I have to do that a couple times before it works correctly.

I need to let it run and figure out what that problem is, but I'm usually just sitting down for a minute when it happens and don't want to sit and wait. Anyone have an idea why it does this?

1-5 3570K|ASUS Z77-PRO | SAPPHIRE 7870 2GB OC | ANTEC TP 750W | SAMSUNG 830 128GB SSD | WD 500GB HDD | CM HYPER 212 EVO | PATRIOT RAM 2x4 1600MHZ | WINDOWS 7 PRO 64 BIT | LG OPTICAL DRIVE

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November 9, 2012 10:24:45 PM
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Check eventvwr.exe administrative events for a log from the disk IO subsystem.
You can get a big lag when blocks of your nice pretty SSD drive have to be retired because of all the writes some stupid non SSD aware program is doing.

if this is the case: start task manager, select the performance tab, and open resource monitor, select the disk tab, open the disk activity, sort for file location and write (B/Sec)

- there can be other causes so just look for the eventvwr.exe error entry first

November 12, 2012 12:16:16 PM

Best answer selected by mrloafy.
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November 12, 2012 12:16:17 PM

johnbl said:
Check eventvwr.exe administrative events for a log from the disk IO subsystem.
You can get a big lag when blocks of your nice pretty SSD drive have to be retired because of all the writes some stupid non SSD aware program is doing.

if this is the case: start task manager, select the performance tab, and open resource monitor, select the disk tab, open the disk activity, sort for file location and write (B/Sec)

- there can be other causes so just look for the eventvwr.exe error entry first


Good call. I check that and looked up the error codings online, there was nothing bad. I ran the SSD magician software that came with the SSD and it fixed it right up, the problems the rest of the weekend.
November 12, 2012 5:30:47 PM

It is really disappointing that the Win8 OS did not detect the issue and you had to go to the OEM software. The OEM (samsung, in this case) really needs to work with Microsoft to make improvements in their support of these SSD drives.
November 16, 2012 2:45:02 PM

johnbl said:
It is really disappointing that the Win8 OS did not detect the issue and you had to go to the OEM software. The OEM (samsung, in this case) really needs to work with Microsoft to make improvements in their support of these SSD drives.


Yeah, it turns out it's doing it again. I spent some time last night checking out the error(s) in the event log and trying to find answers to them on the web. I think the one that is giving me this issue is 7001, which I think i might have fixed last night, but we'll see when I start messing with it this weekend.

I am saying errors, but the other ones are not symptoms, but more errors relating to me needing to use the reset button.

I know the Kernal Power errror is from having to do that.

Also, I get a weird error after the 7001 error where the MS fix wants me to go into the registry and change the timeout to a different number than 30,000ms, i haven't messed with that though, I think the error associated with that fix is 10001, but I'm at work, so that's from memory.

I may try doing a roll back through the OS and see if that helps.
November 16, 2012 5:19:08 PM

mrloafy said:
Yeah, it turns out it's doing it again. I spent some time last night checking out the error(s) in the event log and trying to find answers to them on the web. I think the one that is giving me this issue is 7001, which I think i might have fixed last night, but we'll see when I start messing with it this weekend.

I am saying errors, but the other ones are not symptoms, but more errors relating to me needing to use the reset button.

I know the Kernal Power errror is from having to do that.

Also, I get a weird error after the 7001 error where the MS fix wants me to go into the registry and change the timeout to a different number than 30,000ms, i haven't messed with that though, I think the error associated with that fix is 10001, but I'm at work, so that's from memory.

I may try doing a roll back through the OS and see if that helps.


If the solution was to change the time out, Check your BIOS setting for Hot swap. Enable it if you have the setting, otherwise you would have go and change the registry setting to a longer timeout.

-When blocks of a SSD fail, they can not be written to but can still be read.
Basically, when you have a lot of writes to a single section of a file on a SSD it will destroy that block after 3000 or so cycles. This can happen very fast. (a few minutes). When this happens the SSD electronics will detect this condition, then allocate a new unused block, copy the contents of the old block to the new unused block, and mark the old block as dead.
This happens over and over and can take some time. Problem is that the OS does not know this is occurring and assumes
the device has failed and Issues a reset to the device. If you change the timeout by the registry settting or marking the drive in the BIOS as a hot swap drive it will give the device more time to respond. Other things like virus scanners can also mess the response time up also.

This would happen on windows 7 as well but win 8 seems to have made more changes so it show up more.
December 5, 2012 2:31:03 PM

johnbl said:
If the solution was to change the time out, Check your BIOS setting for Hot swap. Enable it if you have the setting, otherwise you would have go and change the registry setting to a longer timeout.

-When blocks of a SSD fail, they can not be written to but can still be read.
Basically, when you have a lot of writes to a single section of a file on a SSD it will destroy that block after 3000 or so cycles. This can happen very fast. (a few minutes). When this happens the SSD electronics will detect this condition, then allocate a new unused block, copy the contents of the old block to the new unused block, and mark the old block as dead.
This happens over and over and can take some time. Problem is that the OS does not know this is occurring and assumes
the device has failed and Issues a reset to the device. If you change the timeout by the registry settting or marking the drive in the BIOS as a hot swap drive it will give the device more time to respond. Other things like virus scanners can also mess the response time up also.

This would happen on windows 7 as well but win 8 seems to have made more changes so it show up more.


I think I figured out the problem, and have not had a hang up in over two weeks. There was something wrong with the AI Suite 2 software that came with my Asus Mobo. I uninstalled the software and downloaded the latest version, it fixed it. I think the system was getting hung up on a currupted file that was trying to open on startup.
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