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Should I get overclockable i5?

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November 11, 2012 1:10:33 AM

Hello,

I am getting a new system for my 19" LED, strictly within a limited budget.

Well, I asked community whether i5 would support high-end gpu. I don't plan to get one right now.
I'm just getting GTX 550 ti for now, since I would be playing on 19" and offline. GTX 550 Ti is a good choice for that, right?

Now, for processor, I can either get i5 - 3550 or i5 - 3570K. There isn't much price difference between them. What I'm confused about though, would I need to overclock it if I am playing with, say, GTX 670 in future in 1080p resolution? Again, I always play offline! And I also don't plan to do benchmarks.

My confusion is because if I DO need to overclock, then I should get 3570K and motherboard which is compatible for overclocking. Otherwise, I'm set with 3550 and intel H67 motherboard - which will be cheap and under budget for me right now.

Help me. :( 

More about : overclockable

a c 88 K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 1:24:31 AM

The simple fact that you ask if you will need to makes me believe you do not. Yes, there is an improvement in computer performance but it is not that great that the average person would notice except with the highest of settings in the most CPU demanding of games.
My take here is that you should be fine with the 550ti and a non-overclocked system, for a few years anyway...
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November 11, 2012 1:30:57 AM

Yes, I am really not familiar with overclocking process and its benefits. Thing is I can't get demanding motherboard for overclockable processor right now. Maybe, I should get 3570K and a H67 chipset motherboard? And I'll resell it and change motherboard to a better one when I earn a few bucks. Just to be on the safe side, if I ever need to overclock.

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a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 1:50:31 AM

the performance gain gaming wise will be + a few fps when a cpu is decently overclocked. its more apparent if you do benchmark tests or do any cpu strenuous tasks. a normal i5 is good enough for single card builds.
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a c 176 K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 1:55:46 AM

Dont get H67 and P61 boards when you have an Ivy processor, they are incompatible without a BIOS update (which requires a Sandy processor to do). If you aren't going to overclock and are sticking with Ivy, get a H77 board.

Overclocking push's the CPU harder than its stock settings, so you get more performance from it. At the cost of a higher heat output and power usage.
Modern overclocking is fairly simple, you can get a 3570k to 4.2Ghz (~20% overclock) without changing any voltage. Its as simple as setting the CPU multiplier to 42 in the BIOS and leaving it.

Overclocking isnt required to support higher end graphics cards. A 3570k at stock settings will run any card just fine, that goes for the other Sandy/Ivy i5's as well.
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Best solution

November 11, 2012 2:16:43 AM

If you're willing to spend the few extra dollars on the 3570k then I'd ask, why wouldn't you buy it?! By overclocking it you'll likely be able to get it up to 4.4ghz with a decent cooler. Then again, it depends on what your usage intentions are. As someone previously mentioned, you wont notice it much in games. However, if you're running threaded apps ie photoshop, video transcodes, etc. then I'd definately go with the 3570k as you'll definately feel the difference there. If you're not running threaded apps and will strictly be gaming then I probably wouldn't even get an I5. The I3s are plenty capable in the domain of gaming; games only use 2 CPU threads.

As manofchalk stated, don't get an h67 or h61 board; if i remember correctly those are 2nd gen boards (sandybridge) and you're getting a 3rd gen processor (ivybridge). That being said, you'll need an H77 if you don't intend to overclock and a Z77 if you do intend to overclock. I'd recommend an ASRock Extreme 4 Z77 if you get a 3570k, it's very feature rich for the price point.

Compare the Z77 boards here: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/z77-express-ivy-bri...

P.S. It doesn't matter if you're not familiar with how to overclock, there are lots of guides around.
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November 11, 2012 7:09:38 AM

manofchalk said:

Modern overclocking is fairly simple, you can get a 3570k to 4.2Ghz (~20% overclock) without changing any voltage. Its as simple as setting the CPU multiplier to 42 in the BIOS and leaving it.

Overclocking isnt required to support higher end graphics cards. A 3570k at stock settings will run any card just fine, that goes for the other Sandy/Ivy i5's as well.


Does that mean I wouldn't have to set fancy cooling system to overclock 3570k to 4.2 GHz? If yes, then maybe I should consider getting it. I was skeptical because if I decide to overclock I would have to spend extra bucks for liquid cooling system, extra fans, z77 motherboard and what not. That would push my budget almost up to getting i7 system.

This is my build plan right now-

Pro - i5 3550 OR i5 3570k
Mobo - I am confused about this one
RAM - 8 GB Corsair/G.Skill
GPU - ASUS GTX 550 ti - OC
PSU - Cooler Master Thunder 500 w
HDD - Seagate Barravuda 1 TB
Case - Cooler Master Elite 310


Now here is my plan. I am not going to change my processor for at least 3 years. And I am definitely getting a high-end gpu after a year to play all latest games on 1080p.

What I am not going to do - Benchmarks, Video Editing, Photoshop, Online gaming.

So what modifications would you suggest for a long time venture?
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November 11, 2012 7:23:26 AM

"If you're willing to spend the few extra dollars on the 3570k then I'd ask, why wouldn't you buy it?"

I'm definitely considering it. But for overclocking you have to get Z77 mobo, liquid cooling system and extra fans - at least that's what people tell me- and that would push my budget.

" As someone previously mentioned, you wont notice it much in games. However, if you're running threaded apps ie photoshop, video transcodes, etc"

I am definitely NOT going to do use photoshop, editing softwares, online gaming. My only doubt for need of overclocking is because I am getting high-end gpu after a year. And it will be used to play all high-graphics game on 32" or bigger LED on highest resolution possible. Would I need powerful CPU-more Powerful than i5 3550 at that time? I should be aware of it now. because I can't afford to change my processor yearly.

And I mentioned my build plan in above message. I would like to know your suggestions as well. :) 
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a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 7:59:06 AM

ethanimf said:
I'm definitely considering it. But for overclocking you have to get Z77 mobo, liquid cooling system and extra fans - at least that's what people tell me- and that would push my budget.


They're telling you wrong. All you need is a z77 chipset motherboard and a $20 Hyper 212+.

Extra fans is only a need if your case has bad cooling, and as for liquid cooling...

Unless you have a real liquid cooling loop, all the prebuilt liquid coolers will perform worse than their air counterparts, be more likely to fail, and be WAY more likely to take other parts with them when they do fail.
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a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 7:59:48 AM

ethanimf said:
I am definitely NOT going to do use photoshop, editing softwares, online gaming. My only doubt for need of overclocking is because I am getting high-end gpu after a year. And it will be used to play all high-graphics game on 32" or bigger LED on highest resolution possible. Would I need powerful CPU-more Powerful than i5 3550 at that time? I should be aware of it now. because I can't afford to change my processor yearly.



...I'm pretty sure we've answered this. An i5 will run TWO GTX 670s without bottlenecking, with a mild overclock. I'm pretty sure that's more than you're going to be throwing in there, so you're not going to need any sort of an overclock. Processor technology lasts a lot longer than graphics technology does - that's why you see rigs with a first generation i7 with a GTX 680.
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November 11, 2012 10:25:36 AM

Ok. Well, I guess I am getting i5 3550 then. I mean 3.3 GHz - 3.7 GHz should be enough for my use right? That is -- to efficiently play the games at 1080p with single high-end gpu.

Also, I can remain in my budget and less hassle that way.
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November 11, 2012 10:31:42 AM

Best answer selected by ethanimf.
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November 11, 2012 10:35:45 AM

One last question -- is Intel DH77EB Motherboard good enough for i5 3550?
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a b K Overclocking
November 11, 2012 4:58:45 PM

Yes, but it's a micro-atx motherboard.

Unless you're building for that, I'd get a full atx mobo - gives you a lot more room to work with and space between heat-producing parts.
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