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Help Pc build ~$2000

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November 12, 2012 6:35:57 AM

Hi,


Approximate Purchase Date: next week

Budget Range: ~$2000

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming , video editing

Are you buying a monitor: No

Do you need to buy OS: No


Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg

Location: Canada

Overclocking: Yes

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe


Additional Comments:
This is my first time I build a pc. Im not sure if all the piece are compatible.





Cpu: Intel Core i7-2600K Sandy Bridge 3.4GHz
$319.99

Gpu: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 680 or Radeon HD 7970
$504.99 - 499.99

Mobo: ASUS Sabertooth X79 or ASUS Maximus V EXTREME
$334.99 - 397.99

Psu: CORSAIR HX Series HX850
$179.99

Memory: CORSAIR Vengeance 16GB (4 x 4GB)
$75.99

Cooler: CORSAIR Hydro Series H100
$117.99

Case COOLER MASTER HAF X
$179.99

Hdd: Western Digital WD Black 1TB
$109.99

Optical Drive: ASUS 24X DVD Burner
$19.99

Total: $1843.91

Thanks.

More about : build 2000

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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 7:05:11 AM

most noobs think they need a $300 motherboard, half that price can get you a hell of a motherboard. after that you are paying for 3-4way sli/xfire and things you will never use or understand
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November 12, 2012 7:30:24 AM

Here my suggestion

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($203.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($33.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($437.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF XM (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($133.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Wired Optical Mouse ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1718.24
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-12 04:29 EST-0500)
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November 12, 2012 7:36:31 AM

Face palm Location: Canada sorry about that i didn't notice until now.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 7:38:31 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Here my suggestion

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($80.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V PRO ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($203.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($33.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($437.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF XM (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Razer Blackwidow Ultimate 2013 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($133.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Razer DeathAdder Wired Optical Mouse ($49.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1718.24
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-12 04:29 EST-0500)

you pc parts picker people, its never about quality of the actual parts with you people. at least you chose a good graphics card
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November 12, 2012 7:52:46 AM

Anonymous said:
you pc parts picker people, its never about quality of the actual parts with you people. at least you chose a good graphics card
Not sure what you are trying to say all those parts are fine and would work great ;) 
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 9:42:27 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Not sure what you are trying to say all those parts are fine and would work great ;) 

90% of the time i disagree with most of the parts that picked using pcpart picker. the motherboards in particular are way out of line, the typical user/gamer doesnt need a motherboard that costs more than $125, after that you get into wasted money/features you will never use territory. i mainly give advice on motherboards in the mother board section so i should know. also i never agree with power supply selection, they are never 80+ gold and when they are they completely over shoot wattage actually used and that adds to your power bill. the typical no sli/xfire user only needs around 450-500w max across all plat forms with modern graphics cards and processors. also the power supplies on parts selector are almost always twice the cost that they really should be and never top rated products
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November 12, 2012 10:19:09 AM

I am still confused the motherboard is better for overclocking and Asus is quality assurance imo.I don't buy $130 motherboards as i tend to find they skimp in areas or cut corners prime example:
The Z77 Extreme4 can be purchased for as little as $130. Taking a look at the current availability of Intel Z77 motherboards at popular retailers confirms that this motherboard is an absolute bargain and I would say – if you are on a tight budget then give this board some consideration, you should certainly consider it.

The only negative I have for this motherboard is that it slips outside of typical ATX specifications. It’s 3cm thinner than a standard ATX motherboard and as a result may lack secure mounting on the far side since this isn’t a common size, which also means you should be very careful when plugging in the 24-pin ATX motherboard power – as the motherboard may flex.That's not really a big deal to some for me it's the principle i don't want to pay money for something like that i rather pay twenty more dollars for a flawless board.As for the power supply i decided to go with 750W in case he wants to ever add another 670 in future he won't need to upgrade his power supply as well QUOTE Conclusions

"Corsair HX750W is an impressive power supply, being to this date one of the power supplies with the highest efficiency that we’ve tested to date, easily beating all other 750 W power supplies we’ve tested, including those also based on a DC-DC design on the secondary like Antec TruePower New.

Not only the DC-DC design proved to be superior, but Corsair/CWT decided to use only high-end components inside this unit, which features only Japanese capacitors and solid caps on the DC-DC converters in charge of the + 5 V and +3.3 V outputs.

We could also pull up to 910 W at 46º C from this unit, which is really impressive.

The number of cables available is perfect for a 750 W product (12 SATA power connectors, eight peripheral power connectors and four six/eight-pin video card power connectors), allowing you to build a very high-end system with two very high-end video cards (more video cards are supported if you use adapters to convert standard peripheral power plugs into video card power connectors).

The seven-year warranty – losing only to BFG’s lifetime warranty – is also another reason to pick this product over competitors.

Corsair HX750W is a very good choice for users looking for a 750 W power supply with one of the highest efficiencies around."



http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Corsair-HX750W-P...

nVidia itself recommend 500W for a single 670.
http://www.nvidia.in/object/geforce-gtx-670-in.html#pdp...


For testing conducted for SLI 670, the resulting system consumption for SLI is 433W of which 293W are attributed to the gpu cards.
http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-670-2-and-3wa...

Remember, if you are going to overclock the GPUs or processor, then we do recommend you purchase something with some more stamina. The minute you touch voltages on the CPU or GPUs, the power draw can rise real fast and extensively.


All points out to a 750W to be a solid choice.I understand all your points and can agree with them depending the situation.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 11:22:41 AM

bigcyco1 said:
I am still confused the motherboard is better for overclocking and Asus is quality assurance imo.I don't buy $130 motherboards as i tend to find they skimp in areas or cut corners prime example:
The Z77 Extreme4 can be purchased for as little as $130. Taking a look at the current availability of Intel Z77 motherboards at popular retailers confirms that this motherboard is an absolute bargain and I would say – if you are on a tight budget then give this board some consideration, you should certainly consider it.

The only negative I have for this motherboard is that it slips outside of typical ATX specifications. It’s 3cm thinner than a standard ATX motherboard and as a result may lack secure mounting on the far side since this isn’t a common size, which also means you should be very careful when plugging in the 24-pin ATX motherboard power – as the motherboard may flex.That's not really a big deal to some for me it's the principle i don't want to pay money for something like that i rather pay twenty more dollars for a flawless board.As for the power supply i decided to go with 750W in case he wants to ever add another 670 in future he won't need to upgrade his power supply as well QUOTE Conclusions

"Corsair HX750W is an impressive power supply, being to this date one of the power supplies with the highest efficiency that we’ve tested to date, easily beating all other 750 W power supplies we’ve tested, including those also based on a DC-DC design on the secondary like Antec TruePower New.

Not only the DC-DC design proved to be superior, but Corsair/CWT decided to use only high-end components inside this unit, which features only Japanese capacitors and solid caps on the DC-DC converters in charge of the + 5 V and +3.3 V outputs.

We could also pull up to 910 W at 46º C from this unit, which is really impressive.

The number of cables available is perfect for a 750 W product (12 SATA power connectors, eight peripheral power connectors and four six/eight-pin video card power connectors), allowing you to build a very high-end system with two very high-end video cards (more video cards are supported if you use adapters to convert standard peripheral power plugs into video card power connectors).

The seven-year warranty – losing only to BFG’s lifetime warranty – is also another reason to pick this product over competitors.

Corsair HX750W is a very good choice for users looking for a 750 W power supply with one of the highest efficiencies around."



http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Corsair-HX750W-P...

nVidia itself recommend 500W for a single 670.
http://www.nvidia.in/object/geforce-gtx-670-in.html#pdp...


For testing conducted for SLI 670, the resulting system consumption for SLI is 433W of which 293W are attributed to the gpu cards.
http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-670-2-and-3wa...

Remember, if you are going to overclock the GPUs or processor, then we do recommend you purchase something with some more stamina. The minute you touch voltages on the CPU or GPUs, the power draw can rise real fast and extensively.


All points out to a 750W to be a solid choice.I understand all your points and can agree with them depending the situation.


the only thing that board adds over a $125 board is a run of the mill single band wifi card that isnt anything special and an extra internal usb 3.0 header and more usb ports than the typical or advanced user will ever use. how many people need 18 usb ports? like i said it gets into the wasted features area quite fast. it doesnt even have better support for graphics i.e. running dual graphics at x16/x8, so this is not an sli/xfire worthy board as it runs 2 at x16/o or x8/x8. i have to admit that asus has better usb 3.0 and sata performance with the stock intel chip sets compared to others but you will almost never see those returns in real life.

a bit more OC performance, more usb ports than you will ever need and mediocre wifi, does that justify $75 more dollars? not really. where can you put that extra money? into an ssd or a better graphics card were your performance returns are far greater

the OP obviously doesnt know the real performance of a single gtx 670, and with the money saved and not getting a ridiculous motherboard he get a gtx 680. there is absolutely no need to sli these cards unless you are doing triple monitor gaming which the OP did not specify

thats 4 strikes against sli/xfire, dont need it, finding a mobo to get the proper lane speeds, only returns are in multi motor setups, plus it is ALWAYS better to get one single good card rather than sli/xfire

i buy a motherboard that suits my needs perfectly not wasted features

i wasnt talking about that power supply in particular, i would trust it in my rig, what i am saying is MOST of the time the power supply chosen by parts picker is utter crap, you actually made a good selection for an sli setup. once the OP actually uses a high end graphics card he will find he doesnt need sli/xfire thus making it overkill

its better to just sell your graphics card and put that money towards a new graphics card, i call it trading up, i started with a 460 sold it later got a used 480 for $100 after that then i sold that and old junk and got a new 670 for another $125 and ill probably get a 870/880 for another $125 down the road
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 11:50:21 AM

this is an example of a board i would actually buy, the value is impressive and keeps up with an rog board, has a triple power usb 2.0 power [great for usb wireless adapters and long cables] the only thing that i feel are wasted space are the integrated graphics ports but thats a trend that doesnt go away on z77 boards. OCing performance, not many wasted features, better sli performance. the only thing i dont like is the color scheme

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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November 12, 2012 11:58:03 AM

Well the motherboard might be overkill for OP need.I find it quite useful but i am more of an extreme user then the avg.If OP prefer i would look at these motherboards and see if they were acceptable. mobo:GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD3H LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

mobo:ASUS P8Z77-V LK LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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November 12, 2012 12:00:01 PM

Anonymous said:
this is an example of a board i would actually buy, the value is impressive and keeps up with an rog board, has a triple power usb 2.0 power [great for usb wireless adapters and long cables] the only thing that i feel are wasted space are the integrated graphics ports but thats a trend that doesnt go away on z77 boards. OCing performance, not many wasted features, better sli performance. the only thing i dont like is the color scheme

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
It's a nice board but to ugly for me. I am picky and even though i would not be looking at it all the time.I would still be bother by it.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 12:19:04 PM

bigcyco1 said:
Well the motherboard might be overkill for OP need.I find it quite useful but i am more of an extreme user then the avg.If OP prefer i would look at these motherboards and see if they were acceptable. mobo:GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD3H LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

mobo:ASUS P8Z77-V LK LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard with UEFI BIOS
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

each of those boards is skimping a bit. i would get an extreme4, better OC-ability than both of those boards with better vram heatsinks, digi+ 8 + 4 and gold caps., better audio than both boards. the asus has better usb 3.0 speeds and the gigabyte has an msata port but thats all they have going for them.

yet again i am recommending an asrock extreme4 or a gigabyte g.sniper m3. i come from the mobo selection, i know my sheeeet
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November 12, 2012 5:09:00 PM

Quote:
i wasnt talking about that power supply in particular, i would trust it in my rig, what i am saying is MOST of the time the power supply chosen by parts picker is utter crap, you actually made a good selection for an sli setup. once the OP actually uses a high end graphics card he will find he doesnt need sli/xfire thus making it overkill


Um... what? Yeah PC Part Picker does have its' flaws - you do have the usual PSU garbage like Coolmax, Raidmax, Ultra, Apevia, and so on but all the good ones are there - the Corsairs, Seasonics, Antecs, and so on. You can't say everything on that site is utter crap, you can't prove that.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 5:45:18 PM

g-unit1111 said:
Quote:
i wasnt talking about that power supply in particular, i would trust it in my rig, what i am saying is MOST of the time the power supply chosen by parts picker is utter crap, you actually made a good selection for an sli setup. once the OP actually uses a high end graphics card he will find he doesnt need sli/xfire thus making it overkill


Um... what? Yeah PC Part Picker does have its' flaws - you do have the usual PSU garbage like Coolmax, Raidmax, Ultra, Apevia, and so on but all the good ones are there - the Corsairs, Seasonics, Antecs, and so on. You can't say everything on that site is utter crap, you can't prove that.

first instance is your home pc build and the motherboard you are using on your link, its not a true OCing board, the only things it has going for it are an msata port and an extra 2 usb 3.0 ports that i can guarantee uses a sub-par usb controller and same with your audio

then the power supply on the same build, you are using a 950w psu and you are only running a 7870
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November 12, 2012 5:47:22 PM

Anonymous said:
first instance is your home pc build and the motherboard you are using on your link, its not a true OCing board, the only things it has going for it are an msata port and an extra 2 usb 3.0 ports that i can guarantee uses a sub-par usb controller and same with your audio

then the power supply on the same build, you are using a 950w psu and you are only running a 7870


What are you talking about? I can OC my CPU just fine with that motherboard. I suggest you do some more reading before saying things like that.

I'm actually running dual 7870's now - for some reason it hasn't updated my build.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 5:56:39 PM

you can OC with any z77 board, there are boards that definitely do it better with a better audio and a better usb controller, better vram heat sinks for a better price.

you cant trust a website to do the work for you, i select every component and unless its an obvious decision i do my research. that psu is still complete overkill for your setup plus it isnt even modular
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 6:02:07 PM

i feel sorry for the OP he has to witness this pissing match
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November 12, 2012 6:10:38 PM

I think it comes down to different style builders as well as personal preference to each his/her own we should wait for OP to fill us in on what they prefer.
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November 12, 2012 7:24:23 PM

^+1 bigcyco1

Anonymous said:
you can OC with any z77 board, there are boards that definitely do it better with a better audio and a better usb controller, better vram heat sinks for a better price.

you cant trust a website to do the work for you, i select every component and unless its an obvious decision i do my research. that psu is still complete overkill for your setup plus it isnt even modular

your build?
i5-2500k
Gigabyte z68x-ub3p-b3
8gig of GSkill DDR3
Asus GTX 670
120gb sandisk extreme SSD
850W PSU
Fractal Define R3 Pearl Black

That setup must pull <600W with OC?
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 7:45:15 PM

Au_equus said:
^+1 bigcyco1


your build?
i5-2500k
Gigabyte z68x-ub3p-b3
8gig of GSkill DDR3
Asus GTX 670
120gb sandisk extreme SSD
850W PSU
Fractal Define R3 Pearl Black

That setup must pull <600W with OC?

bought the psu when i had sli 480s
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November 12, 2012 7:45:18 PM

Anonymous said:
you can OC with any z77 board, there are boards that definitely do it better with a better audio and a better usb controller, better vram heat sinks for a better price.

you cant trust a website to do the work for you, i select every component and unless its an obvious decision i do my research. that psu is still complete overkill for your setup plus it isnt even modular


1. I hate modular PSUs.

2. Who cares if my PSU is overkill or not? It's inexpensive and a good brand. I have dual GPUs and I'm probably planning on adding an open liquid cooler to that setup in the near future. So yeah the 950W is justified.

3. All onboard audio is pretty much the same, and who cares about the USB controller? I don't. I do my research as well.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 7:50:49 PM

3 against one and i still have valid arguments
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November 12, 2012 7:55:06 PM

Anonymous said:
3 against one and i still have valid arguments


No, you don't. You're trying to discredit us based on personal hardware choices and that's a fallacy every single time.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 7:57:56 PM

g-unit1111 said:
No, you don't. You're trying to discredit us based on personal hardware choices and that's a fallacy every single time.

based on smarter more cost effective and over all better products by fact?
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November 12, 2012 8:00:30 PM

Anonymous said:
based on smarter more cost effective and over all better products by fact?


What are your "facts"? Post some links, then we'll talk. Until then I'm done here.
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November 12, 2012 8:23:21 PM

What do you mean three against one? As if your being picked on you started all this everybody is entitle to their opinion leave it at that.
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 8:55:46 PM

via usb chipset used in your mother board and that isnt compared to intel chipset on an asus board which is much fast than the regular intel because of enhancements
http://www.hardocp.com/article/2012/11/05/gigabyte_z77x...

i am dog tired, well hash this out later, how about you start proving your point and be on the offensive instead of the defensive.

the original discussion is that pcpartspicker isnt the most reliable source when choosing power supplies and motherboards and that the extreme4 is a great value and that its typically not worth paying the extra cash to get a more expensive motherboard when they have such a little amount of return unless its a specific got to have feature. from what i have seen in almost every single instance is that the motherboard selected is usually above $200 but no one actually uses those added features and that a good percentage of the time those features are worthless and unused

point number 2 is power supplies which are typically drastically over shot in wattage for the system whether or not sli/xfire are taken into account, and a good product isnt always selected

from there it went into a pissing fight to were you got on the defensive about your own purchases while providing no valid point that they are a better value to the extreme4
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Anonymous
November 12, 2012 9:02:08 PM

instead of i dont care about this or i dont care about that yet you researched, so did you care at one time?
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Best solution

November 12, 2012 9:20:49 PM

Wow to much honestly give it a rest.I do not use it for that reason.I use it because it's an one stop shop to do a build.I been building rigs since 2007 i know what is good and what is garbage.I do not pick the parts by what is recommended by partpicker.I do not need to explain none of it to you.That's what i been trying to say your entitled to your opinion leave it at that.I told you already I don't buy $130 motherboards as i tend to find they skimp in areas or cut corners prime example:
The Z77 Extreme4 can be purchased for as little as $130. Taking a look at the current availability of Intel Z77 motherboards at popular retailers confirms that this motherboard is an absolute bargain and I would say – if you are on a tight budget then give this board some consideration, you should certainly consider it.

The only negative I have for this motherboard is that it slips outside of typical ATX specifications. It’s 3cm thinner than a standard ATX motherboard and as a result may lack secure mounting on the far side since this isn’t a common size, which also means you should be very careful when plugging in the 24-pin ATX motherboard power – as the motherboard may flex.That's not really a big deal to some for me it's the principle i don't want to pay money for something like that i rather pay more for a flawless board with some extra features.As for the power supply i decided to go with 750W in case he wants to ever add another 670 in future he won't need to upgrade his power supply as well QUOTE Conclusions

"Corsair HX750W is an impressive power supply, being to this date one of the power supplies with the highest efficiency that we’ve tested to date, easily beating all other 750 W power supplies we’ve tested, including those also based on a DC-DC design on the secondary like Antec TruePower New.

Not only the DC-DC design proved to be superior, but Corsair/CWT decided to use only high-end components inside this unit, which features only Japanese capacitors and solid caps on the DC-DC converters in charge of the + 5 V and +3.3 V outputs.

We could also pull up to 910 W at 46º C from this unit, which is really impressive.

The number of cables available is perfect for a 750 W product (12 SATA power connectors, eight peripheral power connectors and four six/eight-pin video card power connectors), allowing you to build a very high-end system with two very high-end video cards (more video cards are supported if you use adapters to convert standard peripheral power plugs into video card power connectors).

The seven-year warranty – losing only to BFG’s lifetime warranty – is also another reason to pick this product over competitors.

Corsair HX750W is a very good choice for users looking for a 750 W power supply with one of the highest efficiencies around."



http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/Corsair-HX750W-P...

nVidia itself recommend 500W for a single 670.
http://www.nvidia.in/object/geforce-gtx-670-in.html#pdp...


For testing conducted for SLI 670, the resulting system consumption for SLI is 433W of which 293W are attributed to the gpu cards.
http://www.guru3d.com/article/geforce-gtx-670-2-and-3wa...

Remember, if you are going to overclock the GPUs or processor, then we do recommend you purchase something with some more stamina. The minute you touch voltages on the CPU or GPUs, the power draw can rise real fast and extensively.


All points out to a 750W to be a solid choice.I understand all your points and can agree with them depending the situation.However i am starting to think your trolling at this point and will no longer discuss it.The first step in building a computer is deciding what type of machine you want to build. Do you want a really inexpensive computer for to use? A small, quiet machine to use as a media computer in the living room? A high-end gaming computer? Or maybe you need a powerful machine with a lot of disk space for video editing. The possibilities are endless, and the type of machine you want to build will control many of the decisions you make down the line. Therefore, it's important to know exactly what you want the machine to accomplish from the start.­

­
You need to decide whether you are building a "cheap machine," a "high-end machine" or a "tricked-out super machine" and then choose your motherboard accordingly. Here are some other decisions that help narrow down your motherboard choices:


What size motherboard do you want to use? If yo re trying to build a smaller computer, you may want to look at micro ATX cases. That means you'll need to buy a micro ATX motherboard. Otherwise you can use a normal ATX motherboard and case. (There are also smaller motherboard form factors like mini-ITX and even nano-ITX if you want to go really small.) The size of the motherboard determines the size of the case you'll need.
How many USB ports do you want? If you want several, make sure the motherboard can handle it.
Do you need FireWire? It's nice if the motherboard accommodates it (although it's also possible to add a card).
Do you want a PCI Express graphics card? Or do you want to use a graphics card on the motherboard to keep the price and size down? If you want to go the cheapest route, make sure the motherboard includes a video card on board (easiest way to tell is to see if there is a DVI or VGA connector on the motherboard). If you want an HDMI port, TV tuner or other video component, make sure the video card or cards you’ve chosen include them.
What pin configuration are you using for the CPU? If you want to use the latest CPUs, make sure that your motherboard accepts them.
Do you want to try things like dual video cards or other certain features. If so, make sure the motherboard supports it.

If you don't care about any of this stuff (or if it all sounds like gibberish to you), then you're probably interested in building a cheap machine. In that case, find an inexpensive motherboard/CPU combo kit and don't worry about all of these details.

My recommendations: Processor I5 3570K or I7 3770k The I5 is the best well rounded processor on the market currently. The I7 is also great as it still uses the same chip set 1155 but it includes hyperthread if you plan to do any heavy rending. Games today as well as in the future for a while I would put my money on it do not use more than 4 cores so wasting money on a hexa (6) core processor right now is not worth it.

Ram - As of right now 8 gig's of ram is still overkill for game playing and most applications. 16 Gig's is mainly just for server's and other High multi-tasking functioning network systems.

GPU - This depends if your running multi monitors and how many. If just want go with the GTX 670 2GB MSI or the Asus 670. If you plan on doing multi monitor I would do the 670 4GB or go with the 3GB 7970 but if your gonna do 3+ monitor I would SLI one of the cards depending on the resolution you decide to play at.

PSU - If you plan to just run one GPU then I would only go with 550W. If you plan on doing more than one SLI then go 750W.

Monitor - depends if you want 120hrz 3D monitor or just a standard LCD/ LCD/LED backlit, etc. etc.... Everyone has their opinion of the best. If you play high speed games FPS I would suggest a 120Hrz if not go with a standard and save some money.

Sound card - I personally never play my games with the sound on usually i am watching TV while I play or listening to music so is pointless. I would however take a look at the Motherboard you choose as some MOBO's have great onboard audio and would just stick with that especially if your just gonna use basic two speaker set up.

HDD - not sure how much storage you needed but I would suggest 1 SSD 240G and 1 HDD Western Digital Black 1 or 2 TB size

OS - just go with Home premium

Cooling - This is a lot of personal preference. There are a few good rasa kits and open air coolers to choose from. If you plan to overclock though to overclock hardcore than a rasa kit system would be best




OP i sincerely apologize your thread end this way as for the trolling it's a bit too much and i no longer will responds to this thread you may send me a message if you like and i will help you in private.Here are professional reviews of the motherboards if your interested .
mobo:GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD5H LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... http://www.vortez.net/articles_pages/gigabyte_z77x_ud5h... <--- review of that motherboard w/benchmarks

http://www.techspot.com/review/521-intel-z77-motherboar... <--- review w/benchmarks

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/motherboards/2012/05/0... <--- review w/benchmarks

http://www.kitguru.net/components/motherboard/zardon/gi... <--- review of that board w/benchmarks

http://computershopper.com/components/reviews/gigabyte-... <--- review of that board w/benchmarks




http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/552?vs=551 <------ Intel Core i7 3930K - 3.2GHz vs Intel Core i7 3770K - 3.5GHz

Take a look at that page and look at the gaming benches (middle of that page on down) then take a look at the power consumption under load bench towards the bottom of that page. Now ask yourself what a $570 cpu gets you vs a $330 cpu or better yet a $230 cpu seeing how the 3570K runs pretty much dead even with the 3770K. Then google some benchmarks to see what the benefit is to running a third card on a single or even dual monitor set up vs a dual card set up. It's comparable to taking your money and setting it on fire hence the reason you would be hard pressed to find one legit site on the net that recommends a tri card set up. Here two different build suggestions i did for you.#1 extreme add rasa kit for cooling http://pcpartpicker.com/ca/p/nDjx #2 mid range high end http://pcpartpicker.com/ca/p/nDiw



mobo:ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cpu_mainboard/asus_p... <--- review w/benchmarks http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/ASUS-P8Z77-V-PRO... <--- review w/benchmarks
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November 13, 2012 11:13:09 PM

Best answer selected by betaore.
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November 13, 2012 11:13:28 PM

hes been sitting too long under the microwave turret in black ops 2. ignore him....
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