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Help requested for suspected PSU issue

Last response: in Systems
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November 13, 2012 2:32:14 AM

Hello,
About 6 months ago I built a desktop system.
Case: Rosewill Challenger
PSU: Antec 550BP
RAM: 2X4GB Corsair DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) MOBO: Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3
CPU: INTEL i5-2400 3.1G
HDD1: 500 GB Seagate Barracuda
HDD2: 160 GB Western Digital Caviar blue
Video Card: Radeon HD 6670 1GB DDR3

Run well without any issues or problems and did everything I wanted. Now it has suddenly developed an issue where when I start up the PC will come on for about 2-5 aeconds. Just long enough to get the fans spinning. It then powers down. It will automatically restart, run for about 30-45 seconds and then power down. It then repeats this cycle until I switch off the PSU.
For troubleshooting, I went through and disconnected the harddrives, removed one RAM module, and video card. Same results, I then reset the CMOS by removing the battery for several minutes.
Following this I had the PSU replaced by Antec, I put the replacement PSU and made up all my connections. i then booted up the PC and everything worked perfectly. Several days later when I tried to start the PC the reverted back to its old problems.
I am running out of ideas to try.
a b B Homebuilt system
November 13, 2012 5:20:09 PM

There might be something causing your PSUs to fail. Possibilities include something wrong with the power coming from the wall outlet, a short circuit in the computer somewhere (such as in the motherboard or another component), and more. Some less likely but still possible causes could include how overkill your PSUs are for the system or that the motherboard, not the PSUs at all, is faulty in some way such as BIOS damage or something else. Another possibility is that the case is causing a short circuit on the motherboard from two connected and electrically conductive parts of the case touching two or more points on the motherboard that shouldn't be shorted to each other.

For testing, you could try removing the components from the case, placing them on a desk or table, and trying to get the system to boot. You should also inspect the motherboard's PCB for any burned or otherwise damaged-looking spots, no matter how small. You could do the same for the PCBs of other components such as the hard drives and RAM modules if you don't find a problem with the motherboard.
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November 13, 2012 5:30:02 PM

Solid advice above. The fact that it started working briefly when you installed a new PSU suggests you might have moved something that has now fallen back into position and causing a short. It can be difficult to tell what exactly is causing a short, I advise removing all unnecessary cables/components and ruling them out one by one (it could even be part of the case, such as the front USB ports or something). Good luck.
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November 14, 2012 1:20:55 AM

blazorthon said:
There might be something causing your PSUs to fail. Possibilities include something wrong with the power coming from the wall outlet, a short circuit in the computer somewhere (such as in the motherboard or another component), and more. Some less likely but still possible causes could include how overkill your PSUs are for the system or that the motherboard, not the PSUs at all, is faulty in some way such as BIOS damage or something else. Another possibility is that the case is causing a short circuit on the motherboard from two connected and electrically conductive parts of the case touching two or more points on the motherboard that shouldn't be shorted to each other.

For testing, you could try removing the components from the case, placing them on a desk or table, and trying to get the system to boot. You should also inspect the motherboard's PCB for any burned or otherwise damaged-looking spots, no matter how small. You could do the same for the PCBs of other components such as the hard drives and RAM modules if you don't find a problem with the motherboard.


About the only thing that I haven't tried is removing the motherboard from the case and inspecting it for any visible damage. I have tried starting up with the front panel usb, reset button and audio connections removed from the mobo. I also had the HDD disconnected and removed. No change, when the system is powered up it gives one beep and then shuts down and then will restart, about 1/20 seconds later it shutdowns and repeats this cycle.
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August 27, 2013 8:15:13 PM

I don't know if the issue was resolved or not but I RMA'd the motherboard back to Gigabyte and installed the replacement motherboard. Taking heed from the advice given I bread boarded everything before installing it in the case. This should have been a happily ever after finished.
But fast forward 6 months and the same issue returns, I turn on the PC, it powers up momentarily (fans start spinning, lights come on) and then it shutdowns. It will repeat this cycle until I turn off the PSU.
The configuration has not been changed, it is still

Case: Rosewill Challenger
PSU: Antec 550BP
RAM: 2X4GB Corsair DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) MOBO: Gigabyte GA-Z68XP-UD3
CPU: INTEL i5-2400 3.1G
HDD1: 500 GB Seagate Barracuda
HDD2: 160 GB Western Digital Caviar blue
Video Card: Radeon HD 6670 1GB DDR3

This time I have two known good PSU's to use.
So I first disconnect everything put the 24 pin and the 8 pin power supplies.
I take out both memory modules, and leave in only the CPU and the HSF assembly.
I also disconnect all the front panel leads and connect a known good on/off push switch.
So with only the Motherboard, CPU and HSF I power up the PC and get the same results. Power comes on momentarily and then shuts down. It then repeats this cycle until I turn off the PSU. I then exchange PSU's and repeat the same test and get the same results.
I then pull the Motherboard out of the Case and repeat same test while sitting on an insulated surface and I get the same results.
This leads me to conclude that it is a motherboard issue. If it is not a motherboard issue then the only other possible issue is that it is CPU problem. How can I test for that (other than putting in a new CPU)?
Are these Z68 motherboards from Gigabyte known for failing frequently? If so what would be a suitable replacement motherboard? I am using this PC for some light to moderate gaming, and work (database analysis and data-mining). SO it needs to be some what fast and reliable
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