Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

300w Graphics Card in a 460w Computer

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
Share
September 18, 2012 2:07:43 AM

Sup guys, I just wanted to start off by saying that Tom's Hardware has helped me many times in the past and that's why I decided to sign up, because maybe you guys can help me here. :) 


Anyways I have a Dell XPS Dimension Generation 4 and I wanted to play more modern games on it, so I'm going to need a new graphics card. I've bought one in the past but this time It's a little different.

Most graphics cards I find require about 300w but in the XPS's guide the specs say that it is 460w.

My question is:

Would a graphics card that requires 300w work in a 460w computer?



Specifications:

Processor
Processor type Intel® Pentium® 4 with HT Technology
NOTE: Not all Pentium 4 processors support Hyper-Threading
technology.
Cache 512 KB, 1 MB, or 2 MB
Memory
Type 400- and 533-MHz DDR2 unbuffered SDRAM
Memory connectors four
Memory capacities 256 MB, 512 MB, or 1 GB non-ECC
Minimum memory 256 MB
Maximum memory 4 GB
NOTE: See "Addressing Memory With 4-GB Configurations" on
page 77 to verify the amount of memory available to the operating
system.
BIOS address F0000h
Computer Information
Chipset Intel 925X Express or Intel 925XE Express
DMA channels eight
Interrupt levels 24
BIOS chip (NVRAM) 4-Mb
NIC Integrated network interface capable of 10/100/1000
communication.
System clock 800- or 1066-MHz data rate (depending on your processor)
Video
Type PCI Express
116 Appendix
Expansion Bus
Bus type PCI 2.3
PCI Express x1 and x16
Bus speed PCI: 33 MHz
PCI Express:
x1 slot bidirectional speed - 500 MB/s
x16 slot bidirectional speed - 8 GB/s
PCI
connector four
connector size 120 pins
connector data width (maximum) 32 bits
PCI Express
connector one x1
connector size 36 pins
connector data width (maximum) 1 PCI Express lane
PCI Express
connector one x16
connector size 164 pins
connector data width (maximum) 16 PCI Express lanes
Drives
Externally accessible:
two 3.5-inch drive bays
two 5.25-inch drive bays
Available devices Serial ATA drive, floppy drive, memory devices, CD drive, CD-RW
drive, DVD drive, DVD-RW drive, and DVD and CD-RW combo
drive
Internally accessible:
two bays for 1-inch high hard drives
Appendix 117
Connectors
External connectors:
Serial 9-pin connector; 16550C-compatible
Parallel 25-hole connector (bidirectional)
IEEE 1394 front-panel 6-pin serial connector
Video 15-hole connector
Network adapter RJ45 connector
PS/2 (keyboard and mouse) two 6-pin mini-DIN
USB two front-panel and six back-panel USB 2.0–compliant connectors
Audio five connectors for line-in, line-out, microphone, surround, and
center/Low Frequency Effects (LFE) channel; two front-panel
connectors for headphones and microphones
System board connectors:
Primary IDE drive 40-pin connector on PCI local bus
Serial ATA four 7-pin connectors
Floppy drive 34-pin connector
Fan 5-pin connector
PCI 2.3 four 120-pin connectors
PCI Express x1 36-pin connector
PCI Express x16 164-pin connector
Telephony (TAPI) 4-pin connector
Controls and Lights
Power control push button
Power light green light — Blinking green in sleep state; solid green for power-on
state.
amber light — Blinking amber indicates a problem with an installed
device; solid amber indicates an internal power problem (see "Power
Problems" on page 46).
Hard-drive access light green
118 Appendix
Link integrity light (on integrated
network adapter)
green light — A good connection exists between a 10-Mbps network
and the computer.
orange light — A good connection exists between a 100-Mbps
network and the computer.
yellow light — A good connection exists between a 1 GB
(or 1000-Mbps) connection.
off (no light) — The computer is not detecting a physical
connection to the network.
Activity light (on integrated network
adapter)
yellow blinking light
Diagnostic lights four lights on the back panel (See "Diagnostic Lights" on page 53.)
Standby power light AUX_PWR on the system board
Case front-panel light color options: off (no light), ruby, emerald, sapphire (default), amber,
amethyst, topaz, diamond (See "Changing the Front-Panel Light
Color" on page 14.)
Power
DC power supply:
Wattage 460 W
Heat dissipation 931.2 BTU/hr
Voltage (see the safety instructions
located in the Product Information
Guide for important voltage setting
information)
fixed-voltage power supply —1 10 V at 50/60 Hz
manual selection and auto-sensing power supplies — 90 to 135 V at
50/60 Hz; 180 to 265 V at 50/60 Hz; 100 V at 50/60 Hz for Japanese
computers
Backup battery 3-V CR2032 lithium coin cell
Physical
Height 49.1 cm (19.3 inches)
Width 22.2 cm (8.7 inches)
Depth 48.8 cm (19.2 inches)
Weight 19 kg (42 lbs)
Controls and Lights (continued)
Appendix 119
Operating –15.2 to 3048 m (–50 to 10,000 ft)
Storage –15.2 to 10,668 m (–50 to 35,000 ft)
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 2:46:09 AM

NovaXP said:
Sup guys, I just wanted to start off by saying that Tom's Hardware has helped me many times in the past and that's why I decided to sign up, because maybe you guys can help me here. :) 


Anyways I have a Dell XPS Dimension Generation 4 and I wanted to play more modern games on it, so I'm going to need a new graphics card. I've bought one in the past but this time It's a little different.

Most graphics cards I find require about 300w but in the XPS's guide the specs say that it is 460w.

My question is:

Would a graphics card that requires 300w work in a 460w computer?



Specifications:

Processor
Processor type Intel® Pentium® 4 with HT Technology
NOTE: Not all Pentium 4 processors support Hyper-Threading
technology.
Cache 512 KB, 1 MB, or 2 MB
Memory
Type 400- and 533-MHz DDR2 unbuffered SDRAM
Memory connectors four
Memory capacities 256 MB, 512 MB, or 1 GB non-ECC
Minimum memory 256 MB
Maximum memory 4 GB
NOTE: See "Addressing Memory With 4-GB Configurations" on
page 77 to verify the amount of memory available to the operating
system.
BIOS address F0000h
Computer Information
Chipset Intel 925X Express or Intel 925XE Express
DMA channels eight
Interrupt levels 24
BIOS chip (NVRAM) 4-Mb
NIC Integrated network interface capable of 10/100/1000
communication.
System clock 800- or 1066-MHz data rate (depending on your processor)
Video
Type PCI Express
116 Appendix
Expansion Bus
Bus type PCI 2.3
PCI Express x1 and x16
Bus speed PCI: 33 MHz
PCI Express:
x1 slot bidirectional speed - 500 MB/s
x16 slot bidirectional speed - 8 GB/s
PCI
connector four
connector size 120 pins
connector data width (maximum) 32 bits
PCI Express
connector one x1
connector size 36 pins
connector data width (maximum) 1 PCI Express lane
PCI Express
connector one x16
connector size 164 pins
connector data width (maximum) 16 PCI Express lanes
Drives
Externally accessible:
two 3.5-inch drive bays
two 5.25-inch drive bays
Available devices Serial ATA drive, floppy drive, memory devices, CD drive, CD-RW
drive, DVD drive, DVD-RW drive, and DVD and CD-RW combo
drive
Internally accessible:
two bays for 1-inch high hard drives
Appendix 117
Connectors
External connectors:
Serial 9-pin connector; 16550C-compatible
Parallel 25-hole connector (bidirectional)
IEEE 1394 front-panel 6-pin serial connector
Video 15-hole connector
Network adapter RJ45 connector
PS/2 (keyboard and mouse) two 6-pin mini-DIN
USB two front-panel and six back-panel USB 2.0–compliant connectors
Audio five connectors for line-in, line-out, microphone, surround, and
center/Low Frequency Effects (LFE) channel; two front-panel
connectors for headphones and microphones
System board connectors:
Primary IDE drive 40-pin connector on PCI local bus
Serial ATA four 7-pin connectors
Floppy drive 34-pin connector
Fan 5-pin connector
PCI 2.3 four 120-pin connectors
PCI Express x1 36-pin connector
PCI Express x16 164-pin connector
Telephony (TAPI) 4-pin connector
Controls and Lights
Power control push button
Power light green light — Blinking green in sleep state; solid green for power-on
state.
amber light — Blinking amber indicates a problem with an installed
device; solid amber indicates an internal power problem (see "Power
Problems" on page 46).
Hard-drive access light green
118 Appendix
Link integrity light (on integrated
network adapter)
green light — A good connection exists between a 10-Mbps network
and the computer.
orange light — A good connection exists between a 100-Mbps
network and the computer.
yellow light — A good connection exists between a 1 GB
(or 1000-Mbps) connection.
off (no light) — The computer is not detecting a physical
connection to the network.
Activity light (on integrated network
adapter)
yellow blinking light
Diagnostic lights four lights on the back panel (See "Diagnostic Lights" on page 53.)
Standby power light AUX_PWR on the system board
Case front-panel light color options: off (no light), ruby, emerald, sapphire (default), amber,
amethyst, topaz, diamond (See "Changing the Front-Panel Light
Color" on page 14.)
Power
DC power supply:
Wattage 460 W
Heat dissipation 931.2 BTU/hr
Voltage (see the safety instructions
located in the Product Information
Guide for important voltage setting
information)
fixed-voltage power supply —1 10 V at 50/60 Hz
manual selection and auto-sensing power supplies — 90 to 135 V at
50/60 Hz; 180 to 265 V at 50/60 Hz; 100 V at 50/60 Hz for Japanese
computers
Backup battery 3-V CR2032 lithium coin cell
Physical
Height 49.1 cm (19.3 inches)
Width 22.2 cm (8.7 inches)
Depth 48.8 cm (19.2 inches)
Weight 19 kg (42 lbs)
Controls and Lights (continued)
Appendix 119
Operating –15.2 to 3048 m (–50 to 10,000 ft)
Storage –15.2 to 10,668 m (–50 to 35,000 ft)


It will work fine, but that Pentium 4 will DRAG across every game, making you play on low graphics setting.
m
0
l
a c 104 U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 7:09:29 AM

Most video card don't require or use 300W, thats probably the total system power. My overclocked 560 pulls around 200W and thats pretty much for a gpu.

What card are you looking at ?
m
0
l
Related resources
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 8:10:16 AM

Modern games + Pentium 4 = recipe for disaster. Buying a new GPU will not help you much, to be honest.

How much are you willing to invest in this system?
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 12:23:20 PM

Wow... didn't think you could still find a 460 anywhere. Great card, if a little behind in terms of features now.

It needs a 450W supply so you are probably OK n that respect, but I would personally go for a newer card with similar performance and less power draw.

The rest of your system is still a major bottleneck though.

m
0
l
September 18, 2012 4:10:31 PM

So could I use a graphics card that requires 300w? Because then I can find a Cheeper one and save money for a new prossesor/CPU.
Also I don't need to play really graphically intense games like bf3 or cod I just need it to play stuff like Free to Play MMOs (even at min. Settings)
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 4:38:06 PM

What graphics card requires 300w???????????????????
m
0
l
a c 104 U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 4:47:06 PM

The new one from NVidia with a toaster build in.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 4:47:19 PM

You'll definitely want to be saving for a new system (mobo, cpu, ram, psu, etc). MMOs are typically cpu-intensive games. Adding a better GPU should help (assuming you are using integrated graphics), but that Pentium 4 platform is really holding everything back. Depending on how long it will be until you get a new system, you can either 1) buy a decent GPU and carry it over into your new system or 2) buy an inexpensive GPU and grit it out until you can afford a new system. I lean toward #2 so as not to create a total imbalance, maybe a $65 radeon 6670.

As far as your PSU requirements go: it's pretty simple. You have a 460w PSU. Card manufacturers state the minimum required PSU requirements. Follow those requirements (they are very conservative) and you should be fine. So if the manufacturer says anything less than "450w minimum PSU" then you are fine.

Hope that helps. Also check out this article if you haven't already: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-graphics-car...
m
0
l
September 18, 2012 4:54:42 PM

You are beating a dead horse. I think you already know that but want someone to find a bail out for you. Not going to happen.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 5:07:12 PM

NovaXP said:
And I'm only willing to spend about $100 so I can play APB Reloaded

Sorry I missed this post the first time through (too many long posts).

These are the minimum requirements for APB Reloaded: http://www.apbrwiki.com/wiki/System_Requirements

Note that it says minimum Core 2 Duo? Your P4 won't run that game so a GPU upgrade won't help. You'll find that most games today require a Core 2 Duo or higher.
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 5:43:57 PM

I can't even believe someone is still running a P4. I mean I've thrown out dozens of those.

I'm still waiting to hear about this 300w graphics card.....with a p4.
m
0
l
September 18, 2012 9:56:13 PM

larkspur said:
Sorry I missed this post the first time through (too many long posts).

These are the minimum requirements for APB Reloaded: http://www.apbrwiki.com/wiki/System_Requirements

Note that it says minimum Core 2 Duo? Your P4 won't run that game so a GPU upgrade won't help. You'll find that most games today require a Core 2 Duo or higher.



My XPS is currently using a Nvidia GeForce 6800

Believe it or not I've got an old Vostro 200 Slim desktop with an Intel Dual Core possessor, is there some sort of weird possibility that I could stack/combine those computers? (Or at the least take out the Dual Core from the Vostro and put it in my XPS)
m
0
l
a b U Graphics card
September 18, 2012 11:18:55 PM

I'm still waiting for you to tell us about this mystery card your looking at that requires 300w...................

No you cannot put the processor in your XPS.
m
0
l

Best solution

a b U Graphics card
September 19, 2012 7:15:03 AM

NovaXP said:
So could I use a graphics card that requires 300w? Because then I can find a Cheeper one and save money for a new prossesor/CPU.
Also I don't need to play really graphically intense games like bf3 or cod I just need it to play stuff like Free to Play MMOs (even at min. Settings)


You misunderstand how graphics card power requirements are indicated.

If the specification says for example: "400W PSU required", that is an indication of the minimum total power supply of your whole system to ensure that the card will have sufficient power to work. It doesn't mean that the card draws 400W.

Your system has a 460W supply, which means in theory you could could install any card that requires a 460W system supply or less.

Does this make sense?
Share
September 29, 2012 12:39:40 AM

Best answer selected by NovaXP.
m
0
l
!