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$2000 first time build

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November 16, 2012 2:41:43 AM

Hi all , This will be my first time building and i don't want to screw it up so any thoughts or issues with the parts please let me know Thanks all!


Approximate Purchase Date: e.g.: next couple of weeks

Budget Range: Around $2000

System Usage from Most to Least Important: gaming, surfing the internet

Are you buying a monitor: Yes

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: newegg, amazon

Location: Livonia, Michigan

Overclocking: Maybe later

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe later

Your Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080, 1920x1200

And Most Importantly, Why Are You Upgrading: Time for a new system



CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($319.99 @ Amazon)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.12 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1.5TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($143.99 @ Mac Mall)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 680 2GB Video Card ($469.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Trooper ATX Full Tower Case ($139.91 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS224-06 DVD/CD Writer ($27.98 @ Newegg)
Monitor: Asus PA248Q 24.1" Monitor ($315.49 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $1925.72
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-15 23:22 EST-0500)

More about : 2000 time build

November 16, 2012 2:44:30 AM

You're wasting money on the i7. If only for gaming and internet, go with i5, the only thing i7 offers is hyperthreading, which games don't utilize anyway. Everything else looks solid other than the lack of a SSD. A high performance gaming system deserves at least a 120gb SSD.

Edit: Also, unless you're planning on SLI, you can go with a 550W PSU. And, 680s are vastly over-priced for their performance. A 670 will offer you 95% performance of a 680 for a $100 less.
November 16, 2012 3:15:50 AM

Very nice plan . I agree with Vance09 that you'll need an SSD for Intel SRT. If gaming is the most important thing for your needs and you don't do any music or viseo work on the side then yes, you can save some bucks by either downgrading your i7 to 3570 or going for the i5. Good set-up!!
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November 16, 2012 2:46:44 PM

I also agree with Vance. Hyperthreading in that i7 is mostly for video editing and other programs like CAD. An i5 will serve you well. As for the 680, you really do get 95% of the performance in the 670. But if you want to get the best performance go with a Sapphire 7970 Vapor-X. They are only $20 cheaper then the 680 you have selected. Otherwise the rest of the build is very solid.
November 16, 2012 6:29:53 PM

vance09 said:
You're wasting money on the i7. If only for gaming and internet, go with i5, the only thing i7 offers is hyperthreading, which games don't utilize anyway. Everything else looks solid other than the lack of a SSD. A high performance gaming system deserves at least a 120gb SSD.

Edit: Also, unless you're planning on SLI, you can go with a 550W PSU. And, 680s are vastly over-priced for their performance. A 670 will offer you 95% performance of a 680 for a $100 less.


I definitely agree with this but I disagree on cutting corners on the power supply. I know the popular opinion around here is to only have the minimum requirement if you get only one - but my philosophy is that you don't want to limit expansion under any circumstances - especially if you're spending $2K on a build. The case and power supply are two things that you'll reuse from build to build and you want to make sure you get good ones. Don't cheap out in this area.

I'd also suggest that instead of getting the GTX 680 that you strongly consider the Radeon 7970 GHz edition - it's a far more powerful GPU for far less money than the 680.
November 16, 2012 6:43:36 PM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nXMg
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nXMg/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nXMg/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($93.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($429.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 660W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($112.20 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($37.77 @ Mac Connection)
Monitor: Asus PA248Q 24.1" Monitor ($315.49 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1615.67
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 15:44 EST-0500)
November 16, 2012 8:09:23 PM

g-unit1111 said:
I definitely agree with this but I disagree on cutting corners on the power supply. I know the popular opinion around here is to only have the minimum requirement if you get only one - but my philosophy is that you don't want to limit expansion under any circumstances - especially if you're spending $2K on a build. The case and power supply are two things that you'll reuse from build to build and you want to make sure you get good ones. Don't cheap out in this area.

I'd also suggest that instead of getting the GTX 680 that you strongly consider the Radeon 7970 GHz edition - it's a far more powerful GPU for far less money than the 680.

Yeah, you're right, for some reason I forgot OP had such a huge budget and I was going off of the idea that they were limited for some reason. Still, the max wattage they need is a 650W, if even that. Of course, you should buy on your current needs, not future. If you don't plan on SLI in your current build, but might in your second but are still unsure of even that, go for the c option now. That's my mantra at least, lol
November 17, 2012 2:34:37 AM

Thanks for the input guys.

Looking at the specs and reviews the Radeon looks pretty good.

With the power supply I wanted a reliable unit that would more than cover my needs.

This may be a dumb question but a SSD will I notice a big difference in performance?

November 17, 2012 3:17:33 AM

With the SSD you will notice a HUGE increase in performance. If you use it as a boot drive (install OS onto it) your PC will start up in about 15 seconds. Also install the games you play most onto it and they load signifigantly faster too. It isn't a dumb question, as a newbie no one expects you to know everything! Which power supply were you referring to?
November 17, 2012 3:30:14 AM

butremor said:
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nXMg
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nXMg/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nXMg/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($93.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($429.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: SeaSonic X Series 660W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($112.20 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($37.77 @ Mac Connection)
Monitor: Asus PA248Q 24.1" Monitor ($315.49 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1615.67
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 15:44 EST-0500)


Do *NOT* mess with low voltage RAM on Sandy / Ivy Bridge builds as that will lead to serious system instability. For these builds you need 1.5V.

Quote:

Yeah, you're right, for some reason I forgot OP had such a huge budget and I was going off of the idea that they were limited for some reason. Still, the max wattage they need is a 650W, if even that. Of course, you should buy on your current needs, not future. If you don't plan on SLI in your current build, but might in your second but are still unsure of even that, go for the c option now. That's my mantra at least, lol


Yeah that's true that you could buy for current needs but that's how systems get outdated very quickly. Trust me - I know what it's like to be burned by bad hardware and I have learned from many mistakes. I feel the only real way to truly future proof a build is to keep all your expansion options open. Especially on a $1500+ budget.
November 17, 2012 3:48:50 AM

The corsair pro 750 w gold.
November 17, 2012 4:01:28 AM

ranchero-68 said:
The corsair pro 750 w gold.


Thought you were talking about a suggested one for a sec. But you can't go wrong with that PSU. If you plan to crossfire/SLI in the future though make sure to check if your power supply can handle it. For instance if you over lock your graphics card and processor like crazy you may be short on power. When it comes time to add another card, usually there is oodles of software available to check whayt your current build is drawing. Always make sure thr numbers are given ehike in a game for instance, since your GPU will be drawing a LOT more then.
November 17, 2012 7:26:39 AM

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/o2gl
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/o2gl/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/o2gl/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Kingston 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($47.49 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Black 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($93.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($429.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($37.77 @ Mac Connection)
Monitor: Asus PA248Q 24.1" Monitor ($315.49 @ B&H)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1655.96
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-17 04:25 EST-0500)

Changed ram
Changed PSU, to provide for crossfire if you will do that
!