Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Solved

A General Purpose PC question

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 16, 2012 1:52:13 PM

Hey all.

I'm planning on building a new general purpose PC for a friend around the holidays. He won't do any gaming on it, ever.

His primary usages are: email, internet, Skype w/ webcam, Facebook, Office (Word, Excel), and Netflix.

My thoughts are below, but my main question is: assuming I go with an AMD mobo/cpu, what is the best mobo/cpu combo in regards to price VS performance? I'm guessing that the mobo/cpu will be the most expensive and important parts of this build.

Budget = $250

Hard drive = He'd like the PC to be viable for at least 5 years, so I'm going with a Western Digitial hdd. Judging by his current hdd usage, I shouldn't need to exceed 250 gb.
OS = Windows 8 for future proofing purposes (also, I happen to have a spare copy so it's free lol).
RAM = ?
MOBO = ?
CPU = ?
Graphics = I'm assuming I'll just go with on-board MOBO graphics here?

He has a keyboard, mouse, and monitor.

Best solution

November 16, 2012 4:06:46 PM

There's a really good deal on a 1TB Seagate drive at the moment, only $49.99 on Newegg. I'd snap that up. I'd also go for the Intel 1155 socket, integrated graphics will be better than the AM3 socket and there's plenty of room to upgrade.

Intel Celeron G530
2x2GB G.Skill NS 1333Mhz
ASRock B75M-DGS
Seagate Barracuda 1TB 7200RPM
Antec BP350 350W
Fractal Design Core 1000

Total - $243.94
Share
a b à CPUs
November 16, 2012 4:46:18 PM

Was just about to post virtually the same, myself. Certainly the best options, for budget. You can't really say that exact set-up will be adequate, for 5 years, but the same can basically be said, for any system, because who knows the demands of some software, that may come out, in the future, and OP's friend's needs may change. What can be done, however, with that sort of system, is upgrade to a much more powerful processor, when necessary, without having to change anything else.
m
0
l
Related resources
November 16, 2012 4:50:34 PM

I'm sure it will be fine, my dad still uses an Athlon 64 x2 system with 2GB RAM I built for him around 4 years ago and that's still running strong even on Windows 7. He's never complained that it is slow and he uses it for browsing/videos/photos/music/skype etc.
m
0
l
November 16, 2012 5:14:09 PM

Thanks for the input folks!

I just remembered I still have this CPU in mothballs: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... from two upgrades ago. Would it be worthwhile to build a system around it? I'm not shaving that much money off by using it since I might (?) need to get a graphics card now...

I am somewhat leery of Seagate because their warranty is only for 2 years whereas WD is for 5. I'm shooting for longevity. That said, 50 bucks for 1TB is hard to ignore and I'll probably go with that.


EDIT: for clarity
m
0
l
November 16, 2012 6:42:16 PM

I've always used Seagate drives and haven't had a single fail. I swear by them.

EDIT: I think that 775 system won't end up costing much less and you lose out on SATA 3, USB 3.0, socket 1155 upgrades etc.
m
0
l
a b à CPUs
November 16, 2012 7:02:51 PM

count_rugen said:
Thanks for the input folks!

I just remembered I still have this CPU in mothballs: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... from two upgrades ago. Would it be worthwhile to build a system around it? I'm not shaving that much money off by using it since I might (?) need to get a graphics card now...

I am somewhat leery of Seagate because their warranty is only for 2 years whereas WD is for 5. I'm shooting for longevity. That said, 50 bucks for 1TB is hard to ignore and I'll probably go with that.


EDIT: for clarity

I would stick with LGA1155. Better, and does give a sensible upgrade route, it a 3 to 4 year timescale, if necessary.
Agree prefer WD to Seagate, for slightly better reliabilty and better warranty (on SOME), but the price on the Seagate probably outweighs those considerations. Is a sort of 97% reliability worth a lot more than, perhaps, a 95% reliability? A bad one can be "luck of the draw" with either. A problem is most likely, before even a 2 year warranty runs out.
m
0
l
November 21, 2012 2:40:48 PM

Best answer selected by count_rugen.
m
0
l
!