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Random Crashes with Brand New Computer

Last response: in Windows 7
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February 21, 2012 2:51:17 PM

We recently purchased parts to build 2 completely new PC's for our company. Both PC's have the exact same specs, hardware and software...yet one of them keeps crashing every couple of days. The other one has not had a single problem yet.

I'm providing the 2 crash dumps from the offending PC. If anyone could help us out in assessing the problem, we'd greatly appreciate it as we have absolutely no clue what's gong on currently.

http://www.sendspace.com/file/gz2ytp
http://www.sendspace.com/file/4xj6mg

If more information is needed, please don't hesitate to ask.

Hardware:
MoBo: Gigabyte GA-Z68AP-D3
CPU: Intel Core i5 2500K
RAM: Corsair XMS DDR3-1333 2x4GB
CASE: PowerSpec Vortex 3620
PSU: OCZ ModXStream Pro 500watt
OS: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit
a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2012 4:46:16 PM

Hi :) 

This is an easy one...

As they are identical, SWAP the parts ONE at a time, until you find the faulty one...

All the best Brett :) 
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a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2012 5:08:48 PM

try reinstalling windows, you could image from the good to the bad.
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February 21, 2012 5:30:16 PM

Brett928S2 said:
Hi :) 

This is an easy one...

As they are identical, SWAP the parts ONE at a time, until you find the faulty one...

All the best Brett :) 


In a constantly busy photo studio, that is not the best solution as that would mean extreme downtime. We can't afford downtime like that.
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February 21, 2012 5:31:01 PM

13thmonkey said:
try reinstalling windows, you could image from the good to the bad.


Ok I'll definitely try this. Any good imaging programs you can recommend?
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a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2012 6:35:44 PM

Can't look at the dumps at work, but all things being equal, RAM is by far the most likely canadate. Run memtest86 on each stick of RAM until you find the bad one.
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February 21, 2012 6:38:34 PM

gamerk316 said:
Can't look at the dumps at work, but all things being equal, RAM is by far the most likely canadate. Run memtest86 on each stick of RAM until you find the bad one.



Definitely will be trying this before I have to wipe everything. And if and when you can look at those dumps, I will so appreciate it. Thanks in advance.
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a b 8 Security
a b $ Windows 7
February 21, 2012 6:48:35 PM

Try using 1 stick of ram at a time on the machine and see if it stay stable with each one over the course o fa day or so. If one fails, swap it out to the other, if they both dont fail, time to keep lookin.
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a c 215 $ Windows 7
February 21, 2012 7:28:18 PM

Both dumps referenced the same files with the same bug check code:

Bug Check 0x116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR

The VIDEO_TDR_ ERROR bug check has a value of 0x00000116. This indicates that an attempt to reset the display driver and recover from a timeout failed.

If you don't have a descrete video card, run memtest as was suggested above on the faulty system.
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a b $ Windows 7
February 22, 2012 11:00:00 AM

Ok, thats an easy one to explain:

0x00000116: VIDEO_TDR_ERROR basically means that the GPU driver craps out. As of Windows Vista, the OS sends a command to restart the driver. In this case, after 10 seconds, teh driver fails to respond, and the OS crashes as a result.

This ALMOST always means either the GPU driver is at fault, or the GPU itself is faulty. Try a different driver version. If the issue remains, its almost certainly a problem with the GPU [test with another one if you have one, otherwise just RMA the GPU].
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February 23, 2012 1:13:15 PM

Ok. I ran memtest86 and everything came back squeaky clean.

As far as the GPU is concerned, that computer is using on-board Intel HD 3000 graphics, same as the other PC. I CAN try to add an extra graphics card we have lying around...but I'm still wondering why this one is being a b**ch, and the other is fine and dandy.
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