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Help on a ~$1500 Gaming PC

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November 16, 2012 8:16:07 PM

Approximate Purchase Date: Sometime before the end of the year, most likely in the coming week

Budget Range: Not over $1500

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming (World of Tanks, Civilization IV & V, Company of Heroes mostly along with some others), Some light recreational CAD work, music and media viewing

Parts Not Required: Display, speakers and backup HDD.

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: I have the list made up on Newegg and would like all parts to be from there unless there is an outrageous deal.

Country: United States

Parts Preferences: Im leaning Intel and NVidia, but am flexible.

Overclocking: Maybe, but would mostly likely not be heavy duty.

SLI or Crossfire: Yes/Maybe I plan on upgrading the Graphics card later. This may be going to twin cards, or a single more powerful one.

Monitor Resolution: 1920x1080

Additional Comments: This is replacing a laptop, so I need to get a keyboard and mouse.

The list I currently have folows
Processor Core i7 3770K
Motherboard ASUS P877Z-V
RAM Corsair Vengance 16GB
Graphics Card MSI N660 TF 2GD5/OC GeForce GTX 660
SSD , OCZ Vertex4 128GB
CPU Cooler Corsair H60
Power Supply Carsair HX Series HX750 750W
Case Cooler Master HAF 912 with 2x200mm Case Fan and 1x 140mm Case Fan to be used instead of the stock fans
Keyboard Logitech G110
Mouse Logitech G9x
OS Windows 8

Any suggestions, comments and recommendations are welcome. Thanks in advance

More about : 1500 gaming

November 16, 2012 8:38:26 PM

Whooooooooooooooaaa. Let me stop you right there.
For gaming i5 is all you need , i7 brings no additional performance.
16 GB ram, well, i guess your cad needs that.
I would choose 670 over 660, idk tho if it fits your budget.
Gimme a sec i will give you another build
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November 16, 2012 8:41:00 PM

Well, I see the guts have been ripped out already :D 
Thoughts on the case butremor?
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November 16, 2012 8:45:45 PM

i7 and 16GB of RAM has no benefit, over i5 and 8GB of RAM, in gaming (and most other things). It can be of benefit, for CAD work, but only significantly, if working in 3D.
If you DO want 16GB of RAM, you should use 2x8GB, rather than 4x4GB. The Corsair H60 is OK, but its performance isn't fantastic, and you can get similar cooling with a much cheaper air cooler, like CoolerMaster Hyper 212Evo.
Even if you are using liquid cooler, and definitely if you use air cooler, would recommend using low profile RAM. The high heatsinks, on those Vengeance, serve no real purpose, with modern RAM. Suggest GSKill Ares, Crucial Ballistix Sport, or Corsair CML.
Unless you are planning to have TWO GPUs, you don't need anything like 750w for PSU. 550w is plenty, get 600w if you want, but any more is wasteful.
Would prefer the HAF 922, and you don't NEED extra fans. Would personally like to use something like Corsair Carbide 300R. Good quality, and plenty, for your components.
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November 16, 2012 8:48:54 PM

This case doesnt have 3.0 which rather disappointing

HEre's the build. The PSU is already picked for SLI, so you have to be sure about this otherwise you wasting money on too poferful PSU
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYEg
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYEg/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYEg/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Sniper Low Voltage Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($117.96 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 431 Plus (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($50.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($37.77 @ Mac Connection)
Total: $1007.95
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 17:48 EST-0500)
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November 16, 2012 9:03:30 PM

@malbluff: The RAM was chosen due to its listing on the QVL for the motherboard. Would rather avoid any issues there and use something from that list. Cooler wise I dont really like the size of some of the larger air coolers and the stress they would put on the motherboard. Also it makes having the heat syncs on the RAM be tall less of an issue. Its personal preference really. As I said in the first post, I may go for a XFire/SLI solution later, so would rather not have to replace the power supply at that time. Part of my desire to use the case I have picked is the abity to run a smaller number of fans and take full advantage of the Fan Xpert 2 functionality of the motherboard. The board only has slots for four fans, hence the desire to use the HAF 912 with the 200mm fans. Also less power draw.

@butremor Thanks for the list, its helpful. I really do want to keep things in Newegg, so will play around with things there. I should also have mentioned that I have a optical drive already as well, but I don't see myself using it that much. I would also like to keep 16GB, just for the use of CAD stuff as I am trying to learn work in a 3D environment. I would also prefer a modular power supply.
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November 16, 2012 9:13:05 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Corsair H100 92.0 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($102.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($63.99 @ NCIX US)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 120GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($84.95 @ B&H)
Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($409.66 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Builder 750W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($83.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 Professional (OEM) (64-bit) ($134.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1275.53
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 18:24 EST-0500)

$200 left over to buy a nice ass mechanical keyboard/mouse.

There isn't anything wrong with air coolers... the stress they put on the motherboard is negligible... (and if you're really that worried, tie it to the case with a string or plastic tie...) and the H60 really isn't that good of a water cooler... it's probably equivalent to a medium/high end air cooler but more expensive...

updated to not include back-up hdd and optical drive...
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November 16, 2012 9:20:17 PM

Ok
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYPS
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYPS/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYPS/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($134.43 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($117.96 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 431 Plus (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($50.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1084.62
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 18:19 EST-0500)

There is tab on the right Price Breakdown By Merchant you can look for only newegg there
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November 16, 2012 9:27:12 PM

Thanks for the lists guys, lots to think about.
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November 16, 2012 9:40:04 PM

bikefish said:
@malbluff: The RAM was chosen due to its listing on the QVL for the motherboard. Would rather avoid any issues there and use something from that list. Cooler wise I dont really like the size of some of the larger air coolers and the stress they would put on the motherboard. Also it makes having the heat syncs on the RAM be tall less of an issue. Its personal preference really. As I said in the first post, I may go for a XFire/SLI solution later, so would rather not have to replace the power supply at that time. Part of my desire to use the case I have picked is the abity to run a smaller number of fans and take full advantage of the Fan Xpert 2 functionality of the motherboard. The board only has slots for four fans, hence the desire to use the HAF 912 with the 200mm fans. Also less power draw.

@butremor Thanks for the list, its helpful. I really do want to keep things in Newegg, so will play around with things there. I should also have mentioned that I have a optical drive already as well, but I don't see myself using it that much. I would also like to keep 16GB, just for the use of CAD stuff as I am trying to learn work in a 3D environment. I would also prefer a modular power supply.

I won't give my full opinion on QVLs, except to say they are more trouble than they are worth. They are RAMs that have actually been tested on the board, they are not a list of suitable RAM. It wouldn't be so bad if they actually tested a real range of modern RAM. Very few include 8GB modules, at all. This is for boards with 4 slots, that support 32GB. How do you ...
The best one I've seen, is for an Asus H77, for which the only 8GB sticks that have been TESTED are in a 64GB kit, of 8. This is for a 32GB board, with 4 slots. I bet they were REALLY well tested.
QVLs were useful when there was a lot of RAMs, on the market, of dubious quality.
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November 16, 2012 9:46:00 PM

I have a build I made Strictly as you said from newegg. (like a boss!) A couple things I went higher end on motherboard. With your budget felt you could handle a mid-higher end motherboard. In my opinion with the gpu was between gigabyte asus and evga, although msi is good to. Different case I feel the HAF series is the way to go with Cooler Master although you can't go wrong with them.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($188.49 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($399.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 922 ATX Mid Tower Case ($105.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1214.42
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 18:49 EST-0500)
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November 16, 2012 9:47:27 PM

Point taken, just rather be safe then have issues. Most likely changing the board out anyway, so the point may be moot.
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November 16, 2012 9:49:33 PM

@bigshootr8 Thanks for the list.
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November 16, 2012 9:51:00 PM

Also if you go mainly with newegg try and get there preferred account purchases over 250 = 6 months no interest purchases over 500 = 1 year
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November 16, 2012 9:57:40 PM

With a $1500 price limit I would look to go with a 240 or 256GB SSD, especially considering you will be installing some bigger programs. Sure everything will fit on a 128GB SSD, but I've always seen people prefer the next step up when installing that many large programs. I'll post a build recommendation a bit later.
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November 16, 2012 10:33:21 PM

With regards to the SSD: I may have access to some blank drives to use for a RAID storage array and also have a 1TB external. So I should be able to keep data on other drives aside from the SSD keeping it as an OS & program drive.
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November 16, 2012 11:49:46 PM

That is true you probably can get away with it. You will get a little more performance out of the 256 samsung 830 versus the 128 but not by a whole lot.
http://www.anandtech.com/show/4863/the-samsung-ssd-830-...

I also have a hard time recommending the h100 for a cooler for the reason that the fans absolutely suck maybe the h100i is better I haven't seen any benchmarks/acoustics for them. I have the cooler and I replaced the fans as soon as I could.

And I think all the video card wars between Nvidia and AMD is retaliative. The new beta drivers that came out have the 670 performing quite well and with the 680 not that much more expensive then the 7970 I would think that the 680 has the 7970 edged in performance. Either way you slice it though it comes down to personal preference. AMD does a much better job with multi monitor. Where as NVIDIA does a better job with 3D surround/PHYSX (yes I know only because its a nvidia tech).
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November 17, 2012 7:39:36 AM

Changed build slightly. Powerful PSU to support crossfire.
Low proflie ram.
Asus mobo
K&M
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/o2jq
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/o2jq/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/o2jq/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.24 @ NCIX US)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($429.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer ($37.77 @ Mac Connection)
Keyboard: Rosewill RK-700M Wired Standard Keyboard ($13.22 @ Amazon)
Mouse: Gigabyte GM-M6800 Wired Optical Mouse ($14.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1191.45
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-17 04:37 EST-0500)
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November 17, 2012 8:05:44 AM

And just for comparison this is what it would cost to go with just newegg.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($54.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($429.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Tempest 410 ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 750W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($139.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Samsung SH-222BB/BEBE DVD/CD Writer
Keyboard: Rosewill RK-700M Wired Standard Keyboard ($14.98 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Gigabyte GM-M6800 Wired Optical Mouse ($19.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1264.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-17 05:05 EST-0500)
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November 20, 2012 7:22:29 PM

Ok, after a short delay, I finally have my build recommendation for you. I agree with most of the advice other posters have given, so I'll only go into detail on where my build differs from theirs.

My build recommendation:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair Hydro Series H60 74.4 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($86.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Logitech G110 Wired Standard Keyboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Logitech G9x Wired Laser Mouse ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Other: COOLER MASTER Megaflow 200 R4-LUS-07AR-GP 200mm Red LED Case Fan ($21.99)
Other: COOLER MASTER Megaflow 200 R4-LUS-07AR-GP 200mm Red LED Case Fan ($21.99)
Other: COOLER MASTER R4-L4S-10AB-GP 140mm Blue LED Case Fan ($11.99)
Total: $1680.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-20 16:07 EST-0500)

Let me begin by saying that I am not recommending you actually purchase both of those SSDs. I simply like both of them and would say it is a flip of a coin between which I like better. So I would recommend picking one of them for your build. I can't really understate how highly I recommend you go with a 240-256 GB SSD over a 120-128GB model. SSDs operate differently from HDDs, and this operational difference actually causes smaller SSDs to wear out much faster than larger capacity models. Without going into too much detail, each cell in a SSD can only be written to a limited number of times. Once it reaches that limit, the cell becomes unusable. The number of cells in a SSD is directly proportional to the capacity of the drive and therefore wear leveling is able to do a much better job prolonging each cell's lifespan in a larger drive. Given the fact that the games you plan on installing are fairly space intensive, and CAD programs usually are as well, I could easily see you filling up a good portion of the drive simply by installing your OS and programs.

Additionally, I highly recommend including an internal HDD for your data files, and I don't just mean music, pictures and videos. Configuring your PC to only store Windows and your program files on the SSD will greatly increase its life as well. You want an internal HDD to be used for the User folders, temp files, and any page file cache. If you already have an internal drive to use for this purpose then you can drop the HDD I recommended from this build list as well.

I went with an XFX brand GPU because you can't really beat a lifetime warranty. EVGA and XFX are the manufacturers who typically include lifetime warranties on their GPUs and I try to stick with them for that reason. You don't want to be stuck dropping another couple hundred on a new GPU because the bearings gave out or got clogged with dust on your GPU's fan.

Next, Corsair has a fully modular, 80Plus Gold version of the PSU you picked out and Newegg is selling it for the same price. I see no reason not to go with the better PSU there, so I swapped that part out for you.

I feel CPU Cooler, Case and case cooling options are entirely a personal preference thing. I left your choices alone on my list, but if you do consider an air cooling option then I hear good things about the CoolerMaster Hyper 212 series coolers. Switching out any of those options could save you a little extra money.


Lastly, don't be frightened by the $1680.83 price tag on my list. Drop one of the SSDs and you are pretty much right back down at the $1500 mark. Make a couple changes to the case or your cooling options and you can easily be $50+ under the mark. I hope you find my build helpful.
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November 20, 2012 9:14:32 PM

Isaiah4110 said:
Ok, after a short delay, I finally have my build recommendation for you. I agree with most of the advice other posters have given, so I'll only go into detail on where my build differs from theirs.

My build recommendation:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($219.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Corsair Hydro Series H60 74.4 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Extreme4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($104.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($62.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Mushkin Chronos Deluxe 240GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($174.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($189.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($86.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: XFX Radeon HD 7970 3GB Video Card ($329.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($119.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 8 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Keyboard: Logitech G110 Wired Standard Keyboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Mouse: Logitech G9x Wired Laser Mouse ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Other: COOLER MASTER Megaflow 200 R4-LUS-07AR-GP 200mm Red LED Case Fan ($21.99)
Other: COOLER MASTER Megaflow 200 R4-LUS-07AR-GP 200mm Red LED Case Fan ($21.99)
Other: COOLER MASTER R4-L4S-10AB-GP 140mm Blue LED Case Fan ($11.99)
Total: $1680.83
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-20 16:07 EST-0500)

Let me begin by saying that I am not recommending you actually purchase both of those SSDs. I simply like both of them and would say it is a flip of a coin between which I like better. So I would recommend picking one of them for your build. I can't really understate how highly I recommend you go with a 240-256 GB SSD over a 120-128GB model. SSDs operate differently from HDDs, and this operational difference actually causes smaller SSDs to wear out much faster than larger capacity models. Without going into too much detail, each cell in a SSD can only be written to a limited number of times. Once it reaches that limit, the cell becomes unusable. The number of cells in a SSD is directly proportional to the capacity of the drive and therefore wear leveling is able to do a much better job prolonging each cell's lifespan in a larger drive. Given the fact that the games you plan on installing are fairly space intensive, and CAD programs usually are as well, I could easily see you filling up a good portion of the drive simply by installing your OS and programs.

Additionally, I highly recommend including an internal HDD for your data files, and I don't just mean music, pictures and videos. Configuring your PC to only store Windows and your program files on the SSD will greatly increase its life as well. You want an internal HDD to be used for the User folders, temp files, and any page file cache. If you already have an internal drive to use for this purpose then you can drop the HDD I recommended from this build list as well.

I went with an XFX brand GPU because you can't really beat a lifetime warranty. EVGA and XFX are the manufacturers who typically include lifetime warranties on their GPUs and I try to stick with them for that reason. You don't want to be stuck dropping another couple hundred on a new GPU because the bearings gave out or got clogged with dust on your GPU's fan.

Next, Corsair has a fully modular, 80Plus Gold version of the PSU you picked out and Newegg is selling it for the same price. I see no reason not to go with the better PSU there, so I swapped that part out for you.

I feel CPU Cooler, Case and case cooling options are entirely a personal preference thing. I left your choices alone on my list, but if you do consider an air cooling option then I hear good things about the CoolerMaster Hyper 212 series coolers. Switching out any of those options could save you a little extra money.


Lastly, don't be frightened by the $1680.83 price tag on my list. Drop one of the SSDs and you are pretty much right back down at the $1500 mark. Make a couple changes to the case or your cooling options and you can easily be $50+ under the mark. I hope you find my build helpful.


I wouldn't suggest a H60 for a person using a higher powered chip. I have a h60 on a AMD A6 at home mainly because its a home theater computer with a cable card in it. For someone whose gaming or using it more intensively I would go with the air cooler Cooler Master EVO if you end up wanting the closed looped coolers from corsair either the H80 or the new H100i would probably be more applicable to your situation.

Also, I wouldn't go with 2 SSD's and a storage drive. If you had 2 SSD's I would want them to be the same and RAID them which he really doesn't need to do. I mean if he was doing 2 512 830's then I could see that being done but way to expensive to do.
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November 20, 2012 10:03:42 PM

bigshootr8 said:
I wouldn't suggest a H60 for a person using a higher powered chip. I have a h60 on a AMD A6 at home mainly because its a home theater computer with a cable card in it. For someone whose gaming or using it more intensively I would go with the air cooler Cooler Master EVO if you end up wanting the closed looped coolers from corsair either the H80 or the new H100i would probably be more applicable to your situation.

Also, I wouldn't go with 2 SSD's and a storage drive. If you had 2 SSD's I would want them to be the same and RAID them which he really doesn't need to do. I mean if he was doing 2 512 830's then I could see that being done but way to expensive to do.

If you read my remarks then you would have seen that I addressed both those items. I stated that the OP should pick one of those two SSDs based on his budget and noted that I only left the cooler he originally picked out because he picked it. At the same time I suggested that he could get better cooling performance and save some more money by going with one of the Cooler Master Hyper 212 models (meaning EVO or Plus).
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November 20, 2012 10:09:00 PM

IN your PCPARTPICKER you listed both. If he were to go with one I would go with the Samsung 830.

And in terms of the cooling that's all fine and dandy just thought the H60 was a poor recommendation given his configuration.
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November 21, 2012 1:22:09 AM

Thanks for all the help guys. Just ordered the parts earlier, so now the wait begins before I can build the thing.
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November 21, 2012 2:23:08 PM

bikefish said:
Thanks for all the help guys. Just ordered the parts earlier, so now the wait begins before I can build the thing.

What was your final parts list?
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November 21, 2012 2:40:18 PM

The changes I made were going to the 256GB version of the OCZ Vertex4 over the 128GB per your advice. Also took the power supply you suggested. I was stubborn and stuck with the ASUS motherboard. Settled on the GTX 670 FTW from EVGA (most of my regular games are Nvidia optimized ones, and the card is just going to crush older games anyway). What you guys are all going to go what the french about is that I did end up with 32GB of RAM. It was on sale for only ~$15 then a good 16GB kit, about the same as a great 16GB kit, and was not a bad kit (G.Skill Ripjaws Z @1866), so I jumped *dives into foxhole with aspestos undies to avoid flames* :whistle:  That made me stick with the H60, because I was concerned about covering up the closet DIMM slot with a larger air cooler.
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January 29, 2013 10:05:57 PM

butremor said:
Ok
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYPS
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYPS/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/nYPS/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($26.29 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro4 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($109.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Kingston 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($134.43 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($117.96 @ Amazon)
Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($359.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master Elite 431 Plus (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($50.98 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($114.99 @ NCIX US)
Total: $1084.62
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-16 18:19 EST-0500)

There is tab on the right Price Breakdown By Merchant you can look for only newegg there


Sorry had to say, if u r going for i5,i think fx8350 is far better option ,with asus crosshair v mobo.. but offcourse if bikefish still wants i7 then its different issue. also the money he wil save can get him gtx680. though i personally use 2x sapphire vapor 7970 6gbs
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January 29, 2013 10:11:18 PM

What gives you the idea that a 8350 is a far better option?
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January 29, 2013 10:12:08 PM

bikefish said:
The changes I made were going to the 256GB version of the OCZ Vertex4 over the 128GB per your advice. Also took the power supply you suggested. I was stubborn and stuck with the ASUS motherboard. Settled on the GTX 670 FTW from EVGA (most of my regular games are Nvidia optimized ones, and the card is just going to crush older games anyway). What you guys are all going to go what the french about is that I did end up with 32GB of RAM. It was on sale for only ~$15 then a good 16GB kit, about the same as a great 16GB kit, and was not a bad kit (G.Skill Ripjaws Z @1866), so I jumped *dives into foxhole with aspestos undies to avoid flames* :whistle:  That made me stick with the H60, because I was concerned about covering up the closet DIMM slot with a larger air cooler.

Hahaha. Not a bad list in the end, and as for the 16 GB vs. 32 GB... You obviously know it is unlikely to ever really be beneficial, but at a $15 difference from a 16 GB kit I certainly can't fault you for grabbing it. Nice build.
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January 29, 2013 10:18:54 PM

since am a AMD guy so i wil suggest this

AMD FX8350 $195
ASUS CROSSHAIR V $251
2X8 GB CORSAIR VENGEANCE (though anything more than 8 is overkill) around $100
SAPPHIRE VAPOR X RADEON 7970 6B $460 OR $560 don remember exactly plz check in new egg
CASE NZXT PHANTOM around $230
SSD 128 gb sud be enough with 1tb WD caviar blue 7200
psu if planning to crossfire later, go for 1000W or more otherwise no need. (am using EVGA supernova for gpus and their cooling as am planning to make it 3 cards soon and have a LEPA G series 1600w for evrything else )

optical drive anything that matches the color , not important

personally i don believe keyboard and mouse make u a better gamer.
i use g500 5700dpi and before u guys tell me , yes it has its downsides but i like it and used to it for many years now.
keyboard anything preferably with backlight if u like to play in dark
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January 29, 2013 10:34:25 PM

bigshootr8 said:
What gives you the idea that a 8350 is a far better option?

well if u simply oc 8350 at 4.8 which is stable though i reached 5.1 before the big bang lol.. it will perform much better than any i5 .. though its tough to catch up with i7 3770k but not far behind , but then again u OC i7 then its a long way ahead
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January 29, 2013 10:45:26 PM

You do realize that the OP already has all of his parts right? Not much point in coming in now and recommending an entirely different platform.
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January 29, 2013 10:48:50 PM

ya i do , i saw that but late , and also in between all intel boys its fun to talk of AMD lol. but tats true using 8350 in pc . i7 3rd gen in m17x and my wife laptop is i5 , u can tel the difference
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January 29, 2013 11:00:36 PM

Well laptop processors are a bit different. The i5 in a laptop to my knowledge is a dual core with 2 hyper-threaded cores . Also you can get a i5 3570k im sure to 4.8 without much fuss. My 2500k people get to 5 ghz pretty easily. But its pointless to go over overclocks because that isn't what you are shipped. AMD I've been reading has awful memory controllers which does effect rendering, editing quite a bit. Also, unless you are a huge overclocker there is no reason to get a ROG board especially just for the regular builder. If you are going to list that you wise as well list a cooler with it a NH-D14 for example.
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January 30, 2013 9:22:38 AM

ya , i use noctua d14 myself .. nice guess but he already is inclined on CM ,, about AMD yes has some probs with rendering , and also single thread functions, though multi threaded stuff it does better , i got better results than 3770k but amd was oc..

well tried to post my config in profile signature but some reason not showing , wil try again
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January 30, 2013 4:57:19 PM

Wow, this got dredged up. The system has been running great for the past two months. I could not be happier with it. Thanks again for all your help those who chipped in back in November.

@Isaiah4110: Ya, the 32GB is a bit overkill, but the system runs really fast and I never have to worry about RAM for the life of the system. I wouldn't recommend it unless you catch a great deal or have so much disposable income you can wipe with $20's.

@AMDvsIntel and NVidia-ATI arguments: I have used Intel processors in practically every computer I have used since a very very old PowerPC. Comparing OCed to nonOCed is a rather odd thing to do IMO, as if you are going to OC you will regardless of the processor. For what I have for a display, and the games I play NVidia cards are better.

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