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[Maxxum 7D] -shutter lag

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Anonymous
March 10, 2005 2:44:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )

I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9
is about 50 - 55ms.

With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
100ms for the Maxxum 7D.

(I was shooting manual focus, manual exp., A/S was off).

Anyone else?

Cheers,
Alan

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
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-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.

More about : maxxum shutter lag

Anonymous
March 10, 2005 7:06:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
<alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:

>I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
>ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
>Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9
>is about 50 - 55ms.
>With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
>in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
>quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
>100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>(I was shooting manual focus, manual exp., A/S was off).
>Anyone else?
>Cheers,
>Alan

I took a few shots of my son throwing snowballs last week. To capture
the snowball going through the air and so it stood out in the shot, I
had to wait until the snowball had my neighbors red brick as the
backdrop. I was shooting at iso 1600 and didn't notice any lag. Here
is a sample of what I mean.

http://mikmaq.250free.com/snowball.jpg

Joe
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 8:11:04 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
<alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:

>
>I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
>ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>
>I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
>Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9
>is about 50 - 55ms.
>
>With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
>in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
>quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
>100ms for the Maxxum 7D.

You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
some math...

Another way is to run a digital stopwatch and fire it at a known point
(say 10 seconds). Because you are predicting the start point, your
reaction times don't really matter.

Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Related resources
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 8:11:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:


> You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
> speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
> 12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
> between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
> some math...

Doh! I'll try that at 78 RPM (468°/sec) I should get a fairly accurate
measure. I'll do a few on film with the Max 9 as well. (Hmm, I think
my turntable only does 33 and 45 ... should still be pretty good at 45).

Thanks!!

Cheers,
Alan


--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 8:29:57 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:

> On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
> <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>
>
>>I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
>>ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>>
>>I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
>>Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9
>>is about 50 - 55ms.
>>
>>With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
>>in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
>>quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
>>100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>
>
> You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
> speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
> 12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
> between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
> some math...
>
> Another way is to run a digital stopwatch and fire it at a known point
> (say 10 seconds). Because you are predicting the start point, your
> reaction times don't really matter.
>
> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>
Is it just me, or does that clock stop briefly as it passes through 0?
(Netscape 7.2).

With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to
be a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the
needle 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.

Maybe I should repeat the turntable test at 33, give me a cleaner hit at
the start point. (Of course I've put away the turntable).

Cheers,
Alan.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 8:29:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Alan Browne" <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote in message
news:o T3Yd.6233$sy1.228923@wagner.videotron.net...
> Owamanga wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
>> <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my ankle
>>>a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>>>
>>>I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my Maxxum
>>>9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9 is about
>>>50 - 55ms.
>>>
>>>With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
>>>in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
>>>quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
>>>100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>>
>>
>> You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
>> speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
>> 12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
>> between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
>> some math...
>>
>> Another way is to run a digital stopwatch and fire it at a known point
>> (say 10 seconds). Because you are predicting the start point, your
>> reaction times don't really matter.
>>
>> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
>> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
>> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>>
> Is it just me, or does that clock stop briefly as it passes through 0?
> (Netscape 7.2).
>
> With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to be
> a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the needle
> 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.
>
> Maybe I should repeat the turntable test at 33, give me a cleaner hit at
> the start point. (Of course I've put away the turntable).
>
> Cheers,
> Alan.
>
Yes. I have trouble stopping the arrow within .1 seconds of straight
up....Also, I perceive a small delay in my computer's reaction time. (the
time between when I click the mouse pointer, and when the arrow stops.)
Of course, with any camera, regardless of how fast it is, one's own
reaction time is going to be a factor, so perhaps it doesn't matter, and
your measurement should include that time anyway.......
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 8:34:31 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:

> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...

http://www.aliasimages.com/images/PICT0522.JPG

About 125 ms.

I'll repeat the turntable tomorrow at 33 RPM. Maybe get a better 'start
time'.

Cheers,
Alan


--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
March 10, 2005 8:39:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Alan Browne wrote:
> Owamanga wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
>> <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
>>> ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>>>
>>> I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
>>> Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the
>>> 9 is about 50 - 55ms.
>>>
>>> With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really
>>> perceptible in human terms) but the results were well behind the
>>> play. It's hard to quantify without instrumentation, but I would
>>> guess that it's closer to 100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>>
>>
>>
>> You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
>> speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
>> 12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
>> between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
>> some math...
>>
>> Another way is to run a digital stopwatch and fire it at a known point
>> (say 10 seconds). Because you are predicting the start point, your
>> reaction times don't really matter.
>>
>> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
>> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
>> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>>
>>
> Is it just me, or does that clock stop briefly as it passes through 0?
> (Netscape 7.2).
>
> With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to
> be a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the
> needle 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.
>
> Maybe I should repeat the turntable test at 33, give me a cleaner hit at
> the start point. (Of course I've put away the turntable).
>
> Cheers,
> Alan.
>

Not just you, the needle seems to be freezing briefly at 0.
Remainds me when I had to demonstrate to a customer that our controller
trips the engine within 40 or 50 ms after a specific condition is met.
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 2:30:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Alan Browne <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:

> With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to
> be a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the
> needle 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.

Try using the 1 at the bottom as the firing point rather than the 0 at the
top. It doesn't stop there.

With my D70 I was consistently hitting what looks like the first "notch"
after the start point, 0.05 I guess. But I'm not sure how valid the
test is, given the human element; I also found that I had to consciously
try *not* to predict the firing moment well enough to lead it and hit the
needle right on the 1, which is more a test of my compensation for shutter
lag than of shutter lag itself.

I guess the real test would be having some way to auto-trigger the shutter
at the "correct" moment.

--
Jeremy | jeremy@exit109.com
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 2:30:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Jeremy Nixon wrote:
> Alan Browne <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>
>
>>With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to
>>be a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the
>>needle 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.
>
>
> Try using the 1 at the bottom as the firing point rather than the 0 at the
> top. It doesn't stop there.
>
> With my D70 I was consistently hitting what looks like the first "notch"
> after the start point, 0.05 I guess. But I'm not sure how valid the
> test is, given the human element; I also found that I had to consciously
> try *not* to predict the firing moment well enough to lead it and hit the
> needle right on the 1, which is more a test of my compensation for shutter
> lag than of shutter lag itself.
>
> I guess the real test would be having some way to auto-trigger the shutter
> at the "correct" moment.
>

The simplest way to do test would be to have a mechanical release that
triggers at the same time the camera shutter button and a very precise
timer. Then all you need is checking the picture for the time it captured.
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 2:30:46 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Jeremy Nixon wrote:
> Alan Browne <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>
>
>>With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to
>>be a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the
>>needle 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.
>
>
> Try using the 1 at the bottom as the firing point rather than the 0 at the
> top. It doesn't stop there.

Doh!!

>
> With my D70 I was consistently hitting what looks like the first "notch"
> after the start point, 0.05 I guess. But I'm not sure how valid the
> test is, given the human element; I also found that I had to consciously
> try *not* to predict the firing moment well enough to lead it and hit the
> needle right on the 1, which is more a test of my compensation for shutter
> lag than of shutter lag itself.
>
> I guess the real test would be having some way to auto-trigger the shutter
> at the "correct" moment.

Yeah you can build or buy such devices...

Cheers,
Alan



--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 4:37:19 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

William Graham wrote:

> Or break the beam with a cardboard tab taped to the outside edge of your
> record. (on the turntable)

Or if you have some electronic kit measure the time taken from triggering
the camera with electronic cable release until when the short apears on the
hot shoe.

Pete

--
http://www.petezilla.co.uk
March 11, 2005 11:46:45 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:
> On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
> <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>
>
>>I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
>>ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>>
>>I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
>>Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9
>>is about 50 - 55ms.
>>
>>With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
>>in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
>>quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
>>100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>
>
> You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
> speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
> 12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
> between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
> some math...
>
> Another way is to run a digital stopwatch and fire it at a known point
> (say 10 seconds). Because you are predicting the start point, your
> reaction times don't really matter.
>
> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>
> --
> Owamanga!
> http://www.pbase.com/owamanga

Cool Web site. Thanks.

I happen to have only my Canon SD10 next to me. It was .1 seconds. No
bad for the tiny little camera. Then again, I did know that it was
acceptable for what I do.

Now I'm curious to try my other cameras.

Clyde
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:01:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Patco wrote:

>
> This site gives lag times in the camera reviews.
> May be of interest to you if you haven't already seen it:
> http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/MAX7/D7A7.HTM


Thanks. Somebody else also posted that link.

Cheers,
Alan
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:10:05 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne wrote:

>
> I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my
> ankle a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>
> I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my
> Maxxum 9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9
> is about 50 - 55ms.
>
> With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
> in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
> quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
> 100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>
> (I was shooting manual focus, manual exp., A/S was off).
>
> Anyone else?
>
> Cheers,
> Alan

Hold on to your bandwidth, people...

Here comes Annika the Second.

--
?
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:21:23 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 17:29:57 -0500, Alan Browne
<alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:

>Owamanga wrote:
>
>> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
>> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
>> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>>
>Is it just me, or does that clock stop briefly as it passes through 0?
>(Netscape 7.2).

Yes, typical. It's useless due to the extra delay at '0'. Both
Explorer and Opera do it too.

The only way to use this is one hand on the trigger, one on the mouse
and hit them at the same time.

Seriously, the 45rpm test is sounding better.

>With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to
>be a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the
>needle 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.

Hmm, so the first tick position might be missing, anyway - suspicious.

>Maybe I should repeat the turntable test at 33, give me a cleaner hit at
>the start point. (Of course I've put away the turntable).

Of course. You have to hide them nowadays.

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:21:24 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Owamanga wrote:

> The only way to use this is one hand on the trigger, one on the mouse
> and hit them at the same time.

Somebody suggested the simple expedient of using, for example, the 6
O'clock position as the start point...

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 3:31:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 23:30:45 -0000, Jeremy Nixon <jeremy@exit109.com>
wrote:

> I also found that I had to consciously
>try *not* to predict the firing moment well enough to lead it and hit the
>needle right on the 1, which is more a test of my compensation for shutter
>lag than of shutter lag itself.

Ah, but often, this is what we do. Sometimes you react to a situation
in which case shutter lag needs to be minimal, because you will
already have got the minimum 110ms human reaction time built in. Often
(ok, I'll clarify, when shooting a moving bird for example) we are
predicting a point of sweet focus, composition etc and so need to be
as good as your method of prediction testing shows it.

Reading that website 'eawckyegcy' [what is it with people and stupid
names? :-)] mentioned:
http://biae.clemson.edu/bpc/bp/Lab/110/reaction.htm

Take a look at the 'arousal' graph. It demonstrates that Alan's
reactions could be improved simply by flicking through playboy for a
few minutes before doing the test (but not too long, otherwise it
slows down again)...

<g>

--
Owamanga!
http://www.pbase.com/owamanga
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 5:43:58 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Alan Browne" <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote in message
news:o T3Yd.6233$sy1.228923@wagner.videotron.net...
> Owamanga wrote:
>
>> On Thu, 10 Mar 2005 11:44:53 -0500, Alan Browne
>> <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>I was shooting my pickup volleyball gang last night ( I sprained my ankle
>>>a few weeks ago, it's not healed yet, so... )
>>>
>>>I had shot this group (and other sports) several times and with my Maxxum
>>>9 I had a good feeling for the timing. The shutter lag on the 9 is about
>>>50 - 55ms.
>>>
>>>With the Maxxum 7D, the delay seems a bit longer (not really perceptible
>>>in human terms) but the results were well behind the play. It's hard to
>>>quantify without instrumentation, but I would guess that it's closer to
>>>100ms for the Maxxum 7D.
>>
>>
>> You can measure shutter lag using a turntable that revolves at a known
>> speed, put a white marker on it and fire when the marker is at
>> 12'o-clock. Take a look at the photo to see how much rotation occurred
>> between the button press and the image capture. Grab calculator and do
>> some math...
>>
>> Another way is to run a digital stopwatch and fire it at a known point
>> (say 10 seconds). Because you are predicting the start point, your
>> reaction times don't really matter.
>>
>> Actually, scrap that and use this website (hmm, it's calibrated to
>> capture lag up to 2seconds! - maybe the turntable would be better...)
>> http://www.shooting-digital.com/columns/schwartz/shutte...
>>
> Is it just me, or does that clock stop briefly as it passes through 0?
> (Netscape 7.2).
>
> With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to be
> a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the needle
> 'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.
>
> Maybe I should repeat the turntable test at 33, give me a cleaner hit at
> the start point. (Of course I've put away the turntable).

play quake 3 for a couple of weeks and try the test again. Also have some
coffee.
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 5:45:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Alan Browne" <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote in message
news:1t8Yd.45450$NW4.471941@weber.videotron.net...
> Jeremy Nixon wrote:
>> Alan Browne <alan.browne@FreeLunchVideotron.ca> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>With that one, I'm getting a little over 0.1 sec... but there seems to be
>>>a delay at 0 when it passes through (may no mean anything if the needle
>>>'catches' up at its next 'tick' position.
>>
>>
>> Try using the 1 at the bottom as the firing point rather than the 0 at
>> the
>> top. It doesn't stop there.
>
> Doh!!
>
>>
>> With my D70 I was consistently hitting what looks like the first "notch"
>> after the start point, 0.05 I guess. But I'm not sure how valid the
>> test is, given the human element; I also found that I had to consciously
>> try *not* to predict the firing moment well enough to lead it and hit the
>> needle right on the 1, which is more a test of my compensation for
>> shutter
>> lag than of shutter lag itself.
>>
>> I guess the real test would be having some way to auto-trigger the
>> shutter
>> at the "correct" moment.
>
> Yeah you can build or buy such devices...

hasn't someone somewhere done all this. Like an independent magazine or
something?
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 10:26:01 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Alan Browne" <alan.browne@freelunchVideotron.ca> wrote in message
news:D 0qglo$bll$2@inews.gazeta.pl...
> eawckyegcy@yahoo.com wrote:
[SNIP]
>
> I don't have the equipment for that. You'll just have to go by my
> sighted firings of a near depressed shutter (and the low variance).
> Since I'm anticipating the crossing of the tapes, finger depressed
> already through most of the closing range, I doubt the human delay
> here is more than 25ms.
>
> (In reflex testing, the subject sees a light come on, so he can't
> anticipate. I can, 'cause I can see the tape approaching the reference
> tape).
>

That probably is a better mimic of what you are doing when you use the
camera for sports anyway - you follow the action and pick your moment,
rather than suddenly having player and ball magically appear before you when
a moment ago there was nothing. The revolving disc isn't quite the same as
following the players, but it's probably closer to a 'real life' experiment
than having a light come on or triggering electronically. The latter would
give results that are more truly comparable between different testers, but
what you are doing probably allows you to compare between your own use of
different cameras, so is probably more useful _to you_.

My ha'pennyworth.



Peter
Anonymous
March 11, 2005 10:26:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.equipment.35mm,rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Bandicoot wrote:

> That probably is a better mimic of what you are doing when you use the
> camera for sports anyway - you follow the action and pick your moment,
> rather than suddenly having player and ball magically appear before you when
> a moment ago there was nothing. The revolving disc isn't quite the same as
> following the players, but it's probably closer to a 'real life' experiment
> than having a light come on or triggering electronically. The latter would
> give results that are more truly comparable between different testers, but
> what you are doing probably allows you to compare between your own use of
> different cameras, so is probably more useful _to you_.

Except that I'm used to the one and I don't want two programs in my
head. (Not that bad, I don't shoot that much sports, and at least with
digital I get good feedback on my timing other than what I see in the
shutter.

Cheers,
Alan
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