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First Gaming Build, Opinions?

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  • New Build
  • Systems
Last response: in Systems
November 18, 2012 5:59:22 AM

OS: Windows 7 Professional (x64)
http://bit.ly/IAsY07

Case: COOLER MASTER Storm Scout Black Steel / Plastic ATX Mid Tower Computer Case
http://bit.ly/dBHP1Z

CPU: Intel Core i5 3570k @ 3.4GHz (Quad-Core)
http://bit.ly/S2Jz2R

Motherboard: ASUS Sabertooth Z77
http://bit.ly/Qmk5PL

RAM: Corsair Dominator 16GB (2x8GB) 240-Pin
http://bit.ly/U28SAT

GPU: EVGA GeForce GTX 560 1GB HDCP Ready SLI Support
http://bit.ly/SVBvOE

SSD: Crucial M4 256GB
http://amzn.to/UMVpeN

HDD: Seagate Barracuda 7200.12. 1 TB
http://amzn.to/S6xvMz

Monitor: Asus HD HDMI 23.6'
http://bit.ly/nRuzbg

DVD Drive: Asus 24X DVD Burner
http://bit.ly/eb817a

PRICE
$1367

Never built a computer in my life. Have decent knowledge of computer hardware. Thinking if this is a good build for the money.

This computer good enough to run Zelda Wind Waker on Dolphin, and Skyrim on max settings with good fps while recording/streaming? And is the price good?

Games I play: Zelda, Dolphin Emulator, Skyrim, WoW, Mw2, etc;

More about : gaming build opinions

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November 18, 2012 6:21:27 AM
November 18, 2012 1:24:45 PM

How much does everything you link come up to in price? Cheaper than what I picked?
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November 18, 2012 4:06:48 PM

Best answer selected by techdude9.
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November 18, 2012 4:14:44 PM

You're *WAY* overpaying for the motherboard and the RAM and not paying enough where it counts: the GPU. There's no point in purchasing a GTX 560 anymore as it's old and outdated. The Asus Sabertooth is also overrated and expensive - the thermal armor traps more heat than it prevents.

Try this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($225.90 @ Amazon Canada)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($55.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Canada Computers)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($37.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F4 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($119.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.99 @ Computer Valley)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($479.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ NCIX)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($87.69 @ DirectCanada)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($18.79 @ DirectCanada)
Total: $1349.31
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-18 13:15 EST-0500)
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November 18, 2012 8:31:12 PM

g-unit1111 said:
You're *WAY* overpaying for the motherboard and the RAM and not paying enough where it counts: the GPU. There's no point in purchasing a GTX 560 anymore as it's old and outdated. The Asus Sabertooth is also overrated and expensive - the thermal armor traps more heat than it prevents.

Try this:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($225.90 @ Amazon Canada)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-U9B SE2 37.9 CFM CPU Cooler ($55.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD3H ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Canada Computers)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($37.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: Samsung Spinpoint F4 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($119.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($107.99 @ Computer Valley)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($479.99 @ Newegg Canada)
Case: Corsair 400R ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ NCIX)
Power Supply: PC Power & Cooling Silencer Mk II 750W 80 PLUS Silver Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($87.69 @ DirectCanada)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($18.79 @ DirectCanada)
Total: $1349.31
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-18 13:15 EST-0500)


Ty. Can that build most games max settings with around 60 fps?
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November 18, 2012 9:33:39 PM

techdude9 said:
Ty. Can that build most games max settings with around 60 fps?


Yeah a 7970 will handle any game you throw at it with the highest FPS and resolution settings.
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November 20, 2012 2:36:15 AM

g-unit1111 said:
Yeah a 7970 will handle any game you throw at it with the highest FPS and resolution settings.


I looked up on newegg the PSU you told me and almost all the reviews were rated 5 eggs, great PSU. But my one concern is every con was about this psu being non modular. Why is modular preferred over non modular?
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November 20, 2012 2:46:53 AM

In a modular PSU, you can use remove and attack wires that you want to use. Here's is an example:




A non modular PSU, however, does not allow this. All wires are clustered together. Here's an example:



Modular PSUs tend to be easier to work with and provide a cleaner look. You have no excess wires and cables lying around, and you can always attack and remove cables as you wish. Non modular PSUs do not allow for this. Non modular PSUs tend to be cheaper (nothing too significant), and provide more wattage at a lower price. In this day an age, there really isn't a reason NOT to go modular.
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November 20, 2012 3:43:24 AM

techdude9 said:
I looked up on newegg the PSU you told me and almost all the reviews were rated 5 eggs, great PSU. But my one concern is every con was about this psu being non modular. Why is modular preferred over non modular?


Store reviews don't really tell you anything though. If you look closer almost all of the negative reviews have nothing to do with the product itself.

Modular or non modular mainly has to do with whether or not you want a large amount of cables in your system. The above post does a better job of explaining it before I could.
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