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What motherboard and psu should i get?

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November 18, 2012 5:29:49 PM

I'm going to build a new pc. this is going to be my first assemble. and i can't figure out what motherboard and psu should i get. these are the specs. any help would be appreciated. thanks

PROCESSOR
Intel Core i7 3770K

GRAPHICS CARD
EVGA GeForce GTX 660 Ti 3GB

RAM
Corsair Vengeance 24GB Triple Channel DDR3

SSD
OCZ Technology 128GB Vertex 4 Series

HEATSINK FAN
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

CASE
corsair Obsidian Series 650D mid-tower Case

i am thinking about Seasonic X Series Modular 80PLUS Gold 760W Power Supply (X-760) but i dont know if it's enough or not.

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a c 252 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 5:42:35 PM

A caveat:
24gb triple channel will not work for you.
That ram is for a different series of motherboards and may be of too high voltage.
Z77 motherboards are double channel with 4 slots.
No game uses more than 2-3gb by itself, 8gbkit of 2 x 4gb is the usual recommendation.
If you have a use for more, then 16gb (2 x 8gb) or 32gb 4 x 8gb) would be ok.
If you need more than 16gb, you will need windows 7 pro or ultimate.

Any Z77 based motherboard will be good. No need for anything expensive, pick your favorite brand.

The psu needs are gated by the graphics card. In this case, a GTX660ti needs only a 450W psu.
Seasonic is about the best quality, but a 760W psu will power even a GTX690.
Nothing wrong with overprovisioning a bit if you get a great deal on a Seasonic unit.

You did not ask, but...

A 3770K is $100 more expensive, and no better for gaming than a 3570K.
That is because few games can use more than 2-3 cores, making the hyperthreads of a 3770 largely irrelevant.

For gaming, you would be much better off spending that $100 on a stronger graphics card like a GTX670, and a 550-600w psu.
a b V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 5:45:09 PM

Just as a side note, what are you doing with this computer? If you're not video editing, music editing, or doing HEAVY photoshop workloads, the i7 is a waste of money. Very few programs, and pretty much no games, make use of the hyperthreading on the i7, which is the only difference between it and the i5.

Save yourself some money that way, and get a GTX 670 instead.
a c 87 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 6:03:41 PM

It's a good board but serious overkill but hey to each his/her own.
a c 87 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 6:25:47 PM

The first step in building a computer is deciding what type of machine you want to build. Do you want a really inexpensive computer for to use? A small, quiet machine to use as a media computer in the living room? A high-end gaming computer? Or maybe you need a powerful machine with a lot of disk space for video editing. The possibilities are endless, and the type of machine you want to build will control many of the decisions you make down the line. Therefore, it's important to know exactly what you want the machine to accomplish from the start.­


­
You need to decide whether you are building a "cheap machine," a "high-end machine" or a "tricked-out super machine" and then choose your motherboard accordingly. Here are some other decisions that help narrow down your motherboard choices:



What size motherboard do you want to use? If yo re trying to build a smaller computer, you may want to look at micro ATX cases. That means you'll need to buy a micro ATX motherboard. Otherwise you can use a normal ATX motherboard and case. (There are also smaller motherboard form factors like mini-ITX and even nano-ITX if you want to go really small.) The size of the motherboard determines the size of the case you'll need.
How many USB ports do you want? If you want several, make sure the motherboard can handle it.
Do you need FireWire? It's nice if the motherboard accommodates it (although it's also possible to add a card).
Do you want a PCI Express graphics card? Or do you want to use a graphics card on the motherboard to keep the price and size down? If you want to go the cheapest route, make sure the motherboard includes a video card on board (easiest way to tell is to see if there is a DVI or VGA connector on the motherboard). If you want an HDMI port, TV tuner or other video component, make sure the video card or cards you’ve chosen include them.
What pin configuration are you using for the CPU? If you want to use the latest CPUs, make sure that your motherboard accepts them.
Do you want to try things like dual video cards or other certain features. If so, make sure the motherboard supports it.


If you don't care about any of this stuff (or if it all sounds like gibberish to you), then you're probably interested in building a cheap machine. In that case, find an inexpensive motherboard/CPU combo kit and don't worry about all of these details.


My recommendations: Processor I5 3570K or I7 3770k The I5 is the best well rounded processor on the market currently. The I7 is also great as it still uses the same chip set 1155 but it includes hyperthread if you plan to do any heavy rending.


Ram - As of right now 8 gig's of ram is still overkill for game playing and most applications. 16 Gig's is mainly just for server's and other High multi-tasking functioning network systems.


GPU - This depends if your running multi monitors and how many. If just want go with the GTX 670 2GB EVGA or MSI or the Asus 670. If you plan on doing multi monitor I would do the 670 4GB or go with the 3GB 7970 but if your gonna do 3+ monitor I would SLI one of the cards depending on the resolution you decide to play at.


PSU - If you plan to just run one GPU then I would only go with 550W. If you plan on doing more than one SLI then go 750W.


Monitor - depends if you want 120hrz 3D monitor or just a standard LCD/ LCD/LED backlit, etc. etc.... Everyone has their opinion of the best. If you play high speed games FPS I would suggest a 120Hrz If you're looking for the best 3D monitor that will also play great in 2D, then you should choose between the BenQ XL2420T and the ASUS VG278H. Both incorporate nVidia's 3D Vision 2 with 3D LightBoost which greatly improves the overall 3D experience.

While the BenQ doesn't disappoint as far as specifications with a 2ms response time, 120Hz refresh rate, low input lag, and a great picture, The XL2420T comes with a lot of other features built-in to this monitor specifically for gamers including FPS Mode, RTS Mode, Intuitive OSD, S. Switch;Height Adjustment, and Game Mode Loader.

If you just want this monitor for the 2D technology, then you might want to consider its predecessor, XL2410T, which is significantly cheaper and has many of the same features as the XL2420T, but has nVidia 3D Vision rather than 3D Vision 2.if not go with a standard and save some money.





HDD - not sure how much storage you needed but I would suggest 1 SSD 240G and 1 HDD Western Digital Black 1 or 2 TB size


OS - just go with Home premium


Cooling - This is a lot of personal preference. There are a few good rasa kits and open air coolers to choose from. If you plan to overclock mildly evo is good enough.If you plan to overclock hardcore than a rasa kit or custom loop would be best.
November 18, 2012 6:39:48 PM

bigcyco1 said:
The first step in building a computer is deciding what type of machine you want to build. Do you want a really inexpensive computer for to use? A small, quiet machine to use as a media computer in the living room? A high-end gaming computer? Or maybe you need a powerful machine with a lot of disk space for video editing. The possibilities are endless, and the type of machine you want to build will control many of the decisions you make down the line. Therefore, it's important to know exactly what you want the machine to accomplish from the start.­


­
You need to decide whether you are building a "cheap machine," a "high-end machine" or a "tricked-out super machine" and then choose your motherboard accordingly. Here are some other decisions that help narrow down your motherboard choices:



What size motherboard do you want to use? If yo re trying to build a smaller computer, you may want to look at micro ATX cases. That means you'll need to buy a micro ATX motherboard. Otherwise you can use a normal ATX motherboard and case. (There are also smaller motherboard form factors like mini-ITX and even nano-ITX if you want to go really small.) The size of the motherboard determines the size of the case you'll need.
How many USB ports do you want? If you want several, make sure the motherboard can handle it.
Do you need FireWire? It's nice if the motherboard accommodates it (although it's also possible to add a card).
Do you want a PCI Express graphics card? Or do you want to use a graphics card on the motherboard to keep the price and size down? If you want to go the cheapest route, make sure the motherboard includes a video card on board (easiest way to tell is to see if there is a DVI or VGA connector on the motherboard). If you want an HDMI port, TV tuner or other video component, make sure the video card or cards you’ve chosen include them.
What pin configuration are you using for the CPU? If you want to use the latest CPUs, make sure that your motherboard accepts them.
Do you want to try things like dual video cards or other certain features. If so, make sure the motherboard supports it.


If you don't care about any of this stuff (or if it all sounds like gibberish to you), then you're probably interested in building a cheap machine. In that case, find an inexpensive motherboard/CPU combo kit and don't worry about all of these details.


My recommendations: Processor I5 3570K or I7 3770k The I5 is the best well rounded processor on the market currently. The I7 is also great as it still uses the same chip set 1155 but it includes hyperthread if you plan to do any heavy rending.


Ram - As of right now 8 gig's of ram is still overkill for game playing and most applications. 16 Gig's is mainly just for server's and other High multi-tasking functioning network systems.


GPU - This depends if your running multi monitors and how many. If just want go with the GTX 670 2GB EVGA or MSI or the Asus 670. If you plan on doing multi monitor I would do the 670 4GB or go with the 3GB 7970 but if your gonna do 3+ monitor I would SLI one of the cards depending on the resolution you decide to play at.


PSU - If you plan to just run one GPU then I would only go with 550W. If you plan on doing more than one SLI then go 750W.


Monitor - depends if you want 120hrz 3D monitor or just a standard LCD/ LCD/LED backlit, etc. etc.... Everyone has their opinion of the best. If you play high speed games FPS I would suggest a 120Hrz If you're looking for the best 3D monitor that will also play great in 2D, then you should choose between the BenQ XL2420T and the ASUS VG278H. Both incorporate nVidia's 3D Vision 2 with 3D LightBoost which greatly improves the overall 3D experience.

While the BenQ doesn't disappoint as far as specifications with a 2ms response time, 120Hz refresh rate, low input lag, and a great picture, The XL2420T comes with a lot of other features built-in to this monitor specifically for gamers including FPS Mode, RTS Mode, Intuitive OSD, S. Switch;Height Adjustment, and Game Mode Loader.

If you just want this monitor for the 2D technology, then you might want to consider its predecessor, XL2410T, which is significantly cheaper and has many of the same features as the XL2420T, but has nVidia 3D Vision rather than 3D Vision 2.if not go with a standard and save some money.





HDD - not sure how much storage you needed but I would suggest 1 SSD 240G and 1 HDD Western Digital Black 1 or 2 TB size


OS - just go with Home premium


Cooling - This is a lot of personal preference. There are a few good rasa kits and open air coolers to choose from. If you plan to overclock mildly evo is good enough.If you plan to overclock hardcore than a rasa kit or custom loop would be best.



Thanks for clearing it out for me.i basically want a high end gaming machine that'll last me a few years.
at the moment im thinking of

MOTHERBOARD
EVGA Z77 FTW

PROCESSOR
Intel Core i7 3770K Processor 3.5GHZ 4 LGA 1155 BX80637I73770K


GRAPHICS CARD
EVGA GeForce GTX 660 Ti FTW+ 3GB w/Backplate

RAM
Kingston Hyper X Genesis 16 GB Kit (X4 GB Modules)

POWER SUPPLY
Seasonic X Series Modular 80PLUS Gold 760W Power Supply (X-760)


HEATSINK FAN
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

SSD
OCZ Technology 128GB Vertex 4 Series

im going for a 760w PSU incase i decide to go SLI in the future.
a c 87 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 6:57:15 PM

harman_nahal said:
Thanks for clearing it out for me.i basically want a high end gaming machine that'll last me a few years.
at the moment im thinking of

MOTHERBOARD
EVGA Z77 FTW

PROCESSOR
Intel Core i7 3770K Processor 3.5GHZ 4 LGA 1155 BX80637I73770K


GRAPHICS CARD
EVGA GeForce GTX 660 Ti FTW+ 3GB w/Backplate

RAM
Kingston Hyper X Genesis 16 GB Kit (X4 GB Modules)

POWER SUPPLY
Seasonic X Series Modular 80PLUS Gold 760W Power Supply (X-760)


HEATSINK FAN
Cooler Master Hyper 212 Plus

SSD
OCZ Technology 128GB Vertex 4 Series

im going for a 760w PSU incase i decide to go SLI in the future.
I would NOT recommend that card get EVGA 670 FTW! ;) 
November 18, 2012 7:01:44 PM

alright thanks. the 670 does look good
a c 87 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 7:15:23 PM

It is i have two and can violently murder all games lol.
November 18, 2012 7:15:57 PM

ya the 670 is a great card.
Do you want a sound card?
November 18, 2012 9:11:18 PM

two that just sounds awesome.
and i haven't thought about a sound card i think the soundcard on the motherboard is enough.
a c 87 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 9:37:38 PM

Yeah you don't need soundcard
a c 252 V Motherboard
November 18, 2012 9:39:07 PM

harman_nahal said:
two that just sounds awesome.
and i haven't thought about a sound card i think the soundcard on the motherboard is enough.

A long time ago, a sound card was used to save cpu cycles. That is no longer needed with today's strong multicore cpu's and decicated sound chips on the motherboard. Motherboard hd 7.1 sound is very good. Try it first; you can always add a discrete card later.
!