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Is this Power Supply enought? PLS help :S (Pictures)

hi guys i want to install a GPU in my system:

i7 3770
6GB ram (2 slots)
2 hdds 5400 rmp
300watts PSU (250 watts continous)
1 DVD Drive

I can get a Sapphire 7770 oc or a Sapphire 7750 ULTIMATE at the same price.
But i dont know if my pc can even run the 77750 :S

So i want to see the opinion of people that really knows about it. (TOMS HARDWARE PEOPLE) xD

This is a picture of my power supply. BRAND=COMPUMAX
(Compumax is a Colombian brand, that sells prebuild desktops. I belive that they use the same cheap psus that HP) xD




http://i46.tinypic.com/345bkt2.jpg


Excuse my english and greetings from Colombia :D
17 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about power supply enought pictures
  1. Hey there! Welcome to the forums!

    I would think that your power supply would run a 7750 alright depending on the rest of your system, like the processor.

    What processor do you have under that intel fan?
  2. you can probably get away with the sapphire 7750 ultimate as none of the power is going to a fan(as it has no fans)
  3. Your PSU may be below the power requirement of your PC with HD7770 but may run HD7750 for some time.

    For an exercise, you may use PSU calculator from http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power or from http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp to see if your PSU is enough or not.You should also include case fans and additional add-on cards, if any. We know nothing about them.
  4. Since your psu is oem, it should deliver its rated wattage. Your i7 3770(non k?) is a 77w cpu. HD7750 is 55w, and HD7770 is 80w requiring a pcie 6pin
    lead from the psu or the use of a 2molex(50w each) to 1 pcie 6pin(75w) adapter. Your psu has a 15A +12v rail(180w). Most pc parts use +12v power in
    one way or another nowadays, but the cpu and gpu are by far the biggest culprits. However, a system will never pull anywhere near its max wattage all
    at once(even if you ran prime95 and Furmark at the same time, let alone while gaming). You have 2 "green" hard drives, a dvd drive, 6GB of ram and
    other items(mobo with power circuits, chipset, lan, audio codec, usb powered devices, any expansion cards besides the video card, cpu fan, and maybe
    case fan; and maybe a case fan powered separately by your psu). I should think a 7750 would be fine, but a 7770 may be a tad iffy. Hope this helps.
  5. Deemo13 said:
    Hey there! Welcome to the forums!

    I would think that your power supply would run a 7750 alright depending on the rest of your system, like the processor.

    What processor do you have under that intel fan?



    i7 3770 (non "K")
    6GB ram (2 slots)
    2 hdds 5400 rmp
    300watts PSU (250 watts continous)
    1 DVD Drive


    Thanks for your answer :D
  6. suat said:
    Your PSU may be below the power requirement of your PC with HD7770 but may run HD7750 for some time.

    For an exercise, you may use PSU calculator from http://www.thermaltake.outervision.com/Power or from http://extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp to see if your PSU is enough or not.You should also include case fans and additional add-on cards, if any. We know nothing about them.



    There are the results:

    System Type: 1 physical CPU
    Motherboard: Regular - Desktop
    CPU Socket: Socket LGA 1155
    CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3400 MHz Ivy Bridge
    CPU Utilization (TDP): 85% TDP

    RAM: 2 Sticks DDR3 SDRAM
    Video Card 1: AMD Radeon HD 7750

    Regular SATA: 1 HDD
    Green SATA: 1 HDD

    DVD-RW/DVD+RW Drive: 1 Drive

    Fans
    Regular: 1 Fan 92mm; (EXHAUST CASE FAN)

    Keyboard & Mouse (included): Yes

    System Load: 90 %


    Recommended PSU Wattage: 237 Watts
    *My system has too a little sd car reader powered by the mobo.


    Quote:
    The total PSU Wattage this tool recommends will give a general idea of the range of continuously available power (not peak power) at which you should be looking. But if you are planning to build a high end gaming system, total Amperage available on the +12V rails—and how that capacity is distributed—could be as or more important than total Watts of power.

    So once you have established the likely power needs of your system, please make sure that any PSU you buy will provide sufficient Amps of current on the various rails for all of your devices, and that it will have the proven reliability, service and support you deserve.



    I dont know if i am understanding what thernaltake says... xD
    They say that I need a PSU capable of deliver 237 watts continuosly? My PSU says that can deliver continuosly 250.


    Thanks for all your help... :D
  7. How old is that psu? just keep in mind psu lose it's effectivenes / power because of aging...

    It will power the 7750, but keep good eye at the voltage..
  8. rdc85 said:
    How old is that psu? just keep in mind psu lose it's effectivenes / power because of aging...

    It will power the 7750, but keep good eye at the voltage..



    My PSU is five days old. (yeah days) xD

    "keep good eye at the voltage"?
    can you explain me a little more of that? :D

    Thanks for answering :D
  9. Best answer
    boroko-sama said:
    There are the results:

    System Type: 1 physical CPU
    Motherboard: Regular - Desktop
    CPU Socket: Socket LGA 1155
    CPU: Intel Core i7-3770 3400 MHz Ivy Bridge
    CPU Utilization (TDP): 85% TDP

    RAM: 2 Sticks DDR3 SDRAM
    Video Card 1: AMD Radeon HD 7750

    Regular SATA: 1 HDD
    Green SATA: 1 HDD

    DVD-RW/DVD+RW Drive: 1 Drive

    Fans
    Regular: 1 Fan 92mm; (EXHAUST CASE FAN)

    Keyboard & Mouse (included): Yes

    System Load: 90 %


    Recommended PSU Wattage: 237 Watts
    *My system has too a little sd car reader powered by the mobo.


    I dont know if i am understanding what thernaltake says... xD
    They say that I need a PSU capable of deliver 237 watts continuosly? My PSU says that can deliver continuosly 250.


    Thanks for all your help... :D


    Your recommended power supply wattage is 255 Watts. I think you have omitted Capacitor Aging factor, which you can take as 10% for one year trouble-free PSU operation.

    Hope this helps.
  10. Some power supplies have poor voltage regulation, which can mean a couple things(my terminology may not be entirely accurate, but the basic idea
    is the same). Power supplies are supposed to deliver power at certain voltages(3.3v, 5v, 12v), but no power supply is perfect. It may be a little lower
    or higher depending on conditions like operating temperature and at what percent the rails are loaded(should still be within a few percent up and down
    from the ideal, though). The closer a power supply can deliver voltage to the ideal, the better. Also, the voltage constantly fluctuates up and down around
    the ideal, but a better power supply will have minimal fluctuation or "ripple" while a poor supply will have high amounts of ripple. Both significant over-
    voltage/undervoltage and high amounts of ripple can have a detrimental impact on system parts both short and long term. While any oem nowadays
    should be providing properly rated supplies with their builds, I can't speak to their voltage regulation. You aren't likely to find such supplies tested at sites
    with the know-how like hardocp, hardwaresecrets, hardwareheaven, jonnyguru and kitguru. I only list them because they are the only sites I know of that
    use load testers, oscilloscopes, and test at higher than ambient temps(like what you find in most people's computer cases). Since your power supply is
    fairly new(I knew it was fairly new since it shipped with an ivy bridge cpu, but not as new as you've most recently posted) aging shouldn't be a factor.

    Edit: If you don't have a load tester or oscilloscope(both expensive), I don't know if there is any other good way to evaluate your psu's actual output.
  11. Most mobo came with voltage reading apps, u could also read the voltage at bios , or using 3rd parties apps like Hwmonitor/OCCP/etc...

    Keep watch at large voltage drop, it a sign the psu working to hard... (bad for the rig)

    example +12 volt rail becoming 11.5v at full load...
  12. I agree that 3rd party apps may be available, but I doubt an oem pc mobo comes with voltage reading apps or has that functionality in the bios.
  13. Best answer selected by boroko-sama.
  14. thank guys... I will upgrade my PSU first :S maybe an xfx 450 or thermaltake 450..

    what of both do you preffer? xD
  15. I would recommend an xfx psu over one from thermaltake 7 days a week and twice on Sunday. Depending on the prices at part stores and sites where
    you live, I would go with something like a corsair cx430 for really cheap or splurge a bit on an even better xfx 550w. Since you picked a best answer,
    Mousemonkey will likely close the thread soon. You can private message me (or MAYBE others here) by clicking the envelopes below our names.

    Also, you can open a new thread asking for advice on what psu to get. If we know where you live and your budget(in your currency), we can better
    suggest quality parts that will give you the best bang for the buck under budget at sites or stores you can buy from where you live. If you open a new
    thread, post a link here or pm me so I can help with the part selection process. I hope all this will be of some help to you.
  16. Ok! thanks to erveryone, the main question was solved... :D I need a new PSU :P
  17. This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
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