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Will HD 7950 bottleneck with i5 3570k?

Tags:
  • Radeon
  • Bottleneck
  • Intel i5
  • HD
  • Processors
  • Graphics
  • Product
Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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September 26, 2012 5:29:21 PM

QUICK RESPONSE PLEASE

I want to buy a ---Radeon HD 7950 3GB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16--- and a i5 3570k. My friend told me that the GPU(which is 3GB) might bottleneck the processor. Btw, I only have a processor and the GPU, any suggestions for the other parts for a good PC built? (up to 850~~) THANK YOU!!

More about : 7950 bottleneck 3570k

September 26, 2012 6:05:21 PM

no way man..
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September 26, 2012 6:20:00 PM

A 620W PSU might be a little too overkill. Going too high can be almost as bad as not having enough.
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September 26, 2012 6:38:42 PM

luciferano said:
A 620W PSU might be a little too overkill. Going too high can be almost as bad as not having enough.

I'm sorry but.. WHAT? since when is having a "high end" Power Supply a bad thing?....
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September 26, 2012 6:38:42 PM

No matter how big your psu is its designed to only give the power you need. Its best to have a bigger psu so your psu don't have to run at 90-100% to give the power you need.
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September 26, 2012 6:43:55 PM

User_not_found_01 said:
QUICK RESPONSE PLEASE

I want to buy a ---Radeon HD 7950 3GB 384-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16--- and a i5 3570k. My friend told me that the GPU(which is 3GB) might bottleneck the processor. Btw, I only have a processor and the GPU, any suggestions for the other parts for a good PC built? (up to 850~~) THANK YOU!!

Motherboard for the 3570K- http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
RAM:http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Power Supply: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
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September 26, 2012 6:44:29 PM

Pgooch said:
No matter how big your psu is its designed to only give the power you need. Its best to have a bigger psu so your psu don't have to run at 90-100% to give the power you need.

exactly
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September 26, 2012 6:45:25 PM

luciferano said:
A 620W PSU might be a little too overkill. Going too high can be almost as bad as not having enough.


uhhh and where did u learn that?
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September 26, 2012 6:50:12 PM

Rockdpm said:
I'm sorry but.. WHAT? since when is having a "high end" Power Supply a bad thing?....


If a PSU isn't loaded enough, the transformers start to act more like tesla coils and this damages the PSU over time. Given a year or two, efficiency and maximum power output drops considerably more than a lower wattage model would if it is of the same build quality, but is built for a lower power requirements that are more suitable for a system. Some PSUs can fail if you get far more wattage than is reasonable, but a 620W is unlikely to fail in this situation, just degrade abnormally fast.

At stock, a 430W PSU such such as Corsair's Builder 430W 80+ PSY is plenty for such a build and for overclocking, something more like their 550W Enthusiast model or the XFX XFX P1-550S-XXB9 would be more than enough to keep power load below 75%, but above 40%. The real break-away for this is when you get near and below 20% load, but there's no reason to push your luck, especially when getting a cheaper PSU would be better.

There is such a thing as going too high-end in wattage. If you want to go further high end, then you should choose a wattage range that is proper for your needs and get a Silver, Gold, or Platinum modular PSU, but don't go far higher in wattage than is practical. If you knew that you were going to upgrade soon, such as throw in a second 7950, then something like one of the 700-850W PSUs from high-quality brands such as Antec, Corsair, Seasonic, and Seasonic partners such as XFX would be more reasonable. That 620W PSU would be more ideal if OP wanted a Radeon 7970 GHz Edition rather than a Radeon 7950.

You can all try to refute that if you want, but you won't be correct. This is a problem with all computer PSUs and many other similarly designed PSUs. I could get more technical about it if any of you want a more complete answer.
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September 26, 2012 6:54:10 PM

luciferano said:
If a PSU isn't loaded enough, the transformers start to act more like tesla coils and this damages the PSU over time. Given a year or two, efficiency and maximum power output drops considerably more than a lower wattage model would if it is of the same build quality, but is built for a lower power requirements that are more suitable for a system. Some PSUs can fail if you get far more wattage than is reasonable, but a 620W is unlikely to fail in this situation, just degrade abnormally fast.

At stock, a 430W PSU such such as Corsair's Builder 430W 80+ PSY is plenty for such a build and for overclocking, something more like their 550W Enthusiast model or the XFX XFX P1-550S-XXB9 would be more than enough to keep power load below 75%.

There is such a thing as going too high-end in wattage. If you want to go further high end, then you should choose a wattage range that is proper for your needs and get a Silver, Gold, or Platinum modular PSU, but don't go far higher in wattage than is practical. If you knew that you were going to upgrade soon, such as throw in a second 7950, then something like one of the 700-850W PSUs from high-quality brands such as Antec, Corsair, Seasonic, and Seasonic partners such as XFX would be more reasonable. That 620W PSU would be more ideal if OP wanted a Radeon 7970 GHz Edition rather than a Radeon 7950.

You can all try to refute that if you want, but you won't be correct. This is a problem with all computer PSUs and many other similarly designed PSUs.

Sorry your hypothesis or thoery... is wrong.
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September 26, 2012 7:14:25 PM

Best answer selected by User_Not_Found_01.
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September 26, 2012 7:21:48 PM

This is an issue with all switched-mode power supplies and computer power supplies are switched-mode power supplies. My own tests over the years with my machines and others have not only supported this, but I've never even heard of evidence that doesn't. High-quality PSUs such as those from the above brands have improved on this over the years and to this day, but it is an issue with all computer power supplies and many others. The lower the load, the more it acts like a tesla coil. This is effect is exponential in that say 20% load is more than twice as bad as 40% load and 10% load is more than twice as bad as 20% load, so it's generally only when you get very low for extended periods of time where it becomes a serious issue that may cause failure, but it increases degradation of efficiency over time. It's generally not as bad as overusing a PSU and its issues have different causes, but it's still bad.

If you want a more technical explanation, then I hope that this will suffice:
Quote:
Quoting US Patent #5402059: A problem can occur when loads on the output of a switching power supply become disconnected from the supply. When this occurs, the output current from the power supply becomes reduced (or eliminated if all loads become disconnected). If the output current becomes small enough, the output voltage of the power supply can reach the peak value of the secondary voltage of the transformer of the power supply. This occurs because with a very small output current, the inductor in the L-C low-pass filter does not drop much voltage (if any at all). The capacitor in the L-C low-pass filter therefore charges up to the peak voltage of the secondary of the transformer. This peak voltage is generally considerably higher than the average voltage of the secondary of the transformer. The higher voltage which occurs across the capacitor, and therefore also at the output of the power supply, can damage components within the power supply. The higher voltage can also damage any remaining electrical loads connected to the power supply.


http://www.patentstorm.us/patents/5402059/description.h...

OP is extremely unlikely to have failure-related issues, but it's not worth risking, especially when you're basically paying more for an unnecessarily high wattage PSU. It's also not worth the efficiency drop over time.
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September 26, 2012 7:32:19 PM

Dude, calm down. I just needed some pieces, don't need to go that far. I also wanted to ask if it's better to get a GTX660it or HD7950 for both gaming and 3d rendering. I appreciate your responses! :) 
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September 26, 2012 7:37:26 PM

I'd go for a good 7950 with an excellent non-reference cooler over any 660 Ti, but some people prefer some 660 Ti models.

For rendering, I don't think that the 660 Ti would be able to come close to the 7950 unless you use programs that only use CUDA instead of OpenCL and Direct Compute.
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September 26, 2012 7:39:38 PM

You'll bottleneck in the original Crysis, but that's it. :D 
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February 10, 2013 11:00:11 AM

Good morning.

I would like to give almost same question as a thread creator.
The PSU good for 3570k but O.C. to ~4.5GHz each day use, Radeon HD 7950 O.C. to ~HD 7970 efficiency, 4x2GB 1600MHz CL6 RAM.
No additional fans, just 1 dvd, maybe later blu-ray drive, 1 HSSD 750GB Seagate and 1 7200 sata3 1tb, and not box cooler on CPU.
Daily usage about 10-11hours it would be nice if PSU will have enough power for this 3 years usage (i read that it is loosing efficiency and if want to use PSU longer, need to take higher wattage).

By enermax calc it gave me 1,15kW PSU suggested ;x
Any suggestion by model and manufacturer which PSU ?

P.S. Mobo AsRock Z77 Extreme4 (saw stable 5GHZ IB on it, so should be enough).
I don't have the set i mentioned yet but thinking seriously to buy. If something is not worth, or there are more efficient parts with the same price, sorry for O.T. please write down.
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