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20D as point & shoot?

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Anonymous
March 27, 2005 10:59:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point &
shoot. (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the
20D, will I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just
assumed no, because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that
cannot function effectively as a point & shoot.

If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell
my Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).

What do you think?

Mike

More about : 20d point shoot

Anonymous
March 27, 2005 11:04:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

To get the most out of a 20D you really need to be aware of all the
setting. I tend to shoot in Av mode to get in the sweet spot of
whatever lens I am using, then watch the shutter speed and adjust the
ISO if needed.

I don't want the camera deciding for me the trade off between shutter
speed, aperture and ISO.

But if you really wanted to, sure you could use it in full auto mode
and it would work ok as a point and shoot. But there will be a number
of us that kind of cringe at the though of doing so.

Scott
March 27, 2005 12:15:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

If the settings in Auto is OK then it should, that is what Auto is for. If
you want to change any of the settings you can do this also.


"Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point & shoot.
> (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the 20D, will
> I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just assumed no,
> because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that cannot function
> effectively as a point & shoot.
>
> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell my
> Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).
>
> What do you think?
>
> Mike
Related resources
Anonymous
March 27, 2005 12:52:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

also, If you want to replicate most point and shoot cameras you will
need a lens that offers 28-105mm actual which would be the Canon
17-85mm lens and then just set the 20D on P for program. The greatest
advantage besides image quality would be reduced shutter lag and
useable ISO settings to 1600 which really enhances ability to shoot in
low light.

Art
Anonymous
March 27, 2005 1:01:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <PoydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net>, Robert Bobb <bobby@bobby.com>
wrote:

> if I buy the 20D, will I be able to use that
> effectively as a point & shoot?

Absolutely. In fact, it will perform MUCH better than a P&S (POS?):
Shutter/AF "lag" is virtually non-existent and you can "switch away" from P&S
to more creative settings whenever you wish.

> I just assumed no, because I have an 35mm slr that's about
> 25 years old that cannot function effectively as a point & shoot.

Perhaps your criteria are different from mine: My AE1 (1979) and T90 (1989)
served me well for P&S, even considering their manual focus.

> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell
> my Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).

You may start your negotiations. I am VERY pleased all aspects of my 20D.

:) 
JR
March 27, 2005 6:50:44 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Rob,

Yes you can 'point and shoot' with a 20D it has all the consumer zone stuff
built in (portrait, landscape, etc.) but why anyone would want to use such a
capable camera in such a limited way is beyond me (how much more can Av and
Sv be to get to grips with?)

Regards

DM

"Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point & shoot.
> (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the 20D, will
> I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just assumed no,
> because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that cannot function
> effectively as a point & shoot.
>
> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell my
> Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).
>
> What do you think?
>
> Mike
March 27, 2005 8:47:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point & shoot.
> (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the 20D, will
> I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just assumed no,
> because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that cannot function
> effectively as a point & shoot.
>
> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell my
> Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).
>
> What do you think?
>
> Mike

yes, but watch out for Auto Focus which can give issues like choosing the
'wrong' point (ie a point you didn't want), not just on a 20D.
Anonymous
March 27, 2005 8:47:21 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"dylan" <no@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:D 26kig$1hs$1@newsg4.svr.pol.co.uk...
>
> "Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
> news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
>> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point &
>> shoot. (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the
>> 20D, will I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just
>> assumed no, because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that
>> cannot function effectively as a point & shoot.
>>
>> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell my
>> Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).
>>
>> What do you think?
>>
>> Mike
>
> yes, but watch out for Auto Focus which can give issues like choosing the
> 'wrong' point (ie a point you didn't want), not just on a 20D.
>
>

Thus, "Program" rather than "Automatic..."

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
March 27, 2005 8:58:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point & shoot.
> (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the 20D, will
> I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just assumed no,
> because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that cannot function
> effectively as a point & shoot.
>
> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell my
> Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).

Yes, it works fine as a P&S. Also, the "P" mode (for Program) is sort of in
between and you might learn to like that mode. It's automatic but let's you
easily fiddle with ISO, focus points, aperture, etc. I sometimes switch to
the Sports mode when out looking for birds as they can kick up in a hurry.
It's a very quick way to boost the ISO, select continuous shooting and AI
servo focus, all at the same with just a flick of the dial. I fail to see
how some posters can bash the auto modes to the point where one might think
that they are totally useless. I wonder if some these folks ever take a
variety of shots. I mean, a studio photographer has a different agenda than
a general user!
March 27, 2005 11:12:52 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Just FYI, a good alternative to "Sports mode" is to put the camera in
apeture priority and set it to the widest apeture your lens has, you will
automatically get the highest shutter speed at your selected ISO and retain
the ability to overide the setting the camera chooses.
Two thoughts about using the 20D as a P&S camera: 1) The digital rebel is
approx $500 cheaper if you are merely looking to improve upon a consumer P&S
and 2) depending on the size of your current P&S you might want to save it
as a conveniance camera. I love my 20D, but for some ocaisions I take my
Sony Cybershot for conveniance. No comparison when it comes to image
quality, but much easier on the neck to carry, especially in close quarters
(Partys, public transportation, etc.).

My 2 cents.


"Charles Schuler" <charleschuler@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:x-KdnUNDyKwAsdrfRVn-pw@comcast.com...
>
> "Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
> news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
>> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point &
>> shoot. (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the
>> 20D, will I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just
>> assumed no, because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that
>> cannot function effectively as a point & shoot.
>>
>> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell my
>> Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).
>
> Yes, it works fine as a P&S. Also, the "P" mode (for Program) is sort of
> in between and you might learn to like that mode. It's automatic but
> let's you easily fiddle with ISO, focus points, aperture, etc. I
> sometimes switch to the Sports mode when out looking for birds as they can
> kick up in a hurry. It's a very quick way to boost the ISO, select
> continuous shooting and AI servo focus, all at the same with just a flick
> of the dial. I fail to see how some posters can bash the auto modes to
> the point where one might think that they are totally useless. I wonder
> if some these folks ever take a variety of shots. I mean, a studio
> photographer has a different agenda than a general user!
>
March 28, 2005 4:48:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote in message
news:p oydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net...
> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point &
> shoot. (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the
> 20D, will I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot? I just
> assumed no, because I have an 35mm slr that's about 25 years old that
> cannot function effectively as a point & shoot.
>
> If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell
> my Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).
>
> What do you think?
>
> Mike

Yes, it can (ofcourse) - but then why bother with "Auto" mode. The most auto
that I ever go on my 20D is Av or Tv. I cant imagine why you would want the
camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter. You probably think I sounds
sarcastic ( I dont mean to) - but after about a week of owning your 20D, you
will know what I am talking about. Also I recommend reading the following
short book:

"Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs with a Film or
Digital Camera (Updated Edition)"

http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0817463003/qid=1...


From my point of view, the _only_ purpose of a P&S (if you already have
DSLR) would be compactness. Its worth keeping around for those situations
where you cannot lug around your gear.
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 8:38:03 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
"Fyimo" <arthurw@ix.netcom.com> wrote in message
news:1111942376.723446.150890@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> also, If you want to replicate most point and shoot cameras you will
> need a lens that offers 28-105mm actual which would be the Canon
> 17-85mm lens and then just set the 20D on P for program. The greatest
> advantage besides image quality would be reduced shutter lag and
> useable ISO settings to 1600 which really enhances ability to shoot in
> low light.
>
> Art
>
Or 18-55 kit lens...the 17-85 IS replicates the 28-135 IS.
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 2:05:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Kelly wrote:

> Just FYI, a good alternative to "Sports mode" is to put the camera in
> apeture priority and set it to the widest apeture your lens has, you will
> automatically get the highest shutter speed at your selected ISO and retain
> the ability to overide the setting the camera chooses.

The usual 'sports' mode is speed priority and let the camera select
aperture. For the simple reason that sports editors prefer sharp frozen
action shots. So higher ISO setting if required, shutter speeds in the
1/250 and faster.
Better yet, if the lighting is not shifting, determine the manual
setting (by meter or chimping) and set that and leave it. Consistenct
in expsoure is welcome too.

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
Anonymous
March 28, 2005 11:17:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Robert Bobb" <bobby@bobby.com> wrote:
> Something just occurred to me... I have an Olympus Camedia point & shoot.
> (I'm really happy with the model that I have.) Now if I buy the 20D, will
> I be able to use that effectively as a point & shoot?

Absolutely! Canon's algorithms, after over 25 years of experience, are
extremely sophisticated. The various automatic basic zone modes do an
excellent job of selecting the appropriate shutter speed and aperture under
most conditions.
April 26, 2005 5:21:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <PoydnUbrqcYGM9vfRVn-rw@bright.net>,
Robert Bobb <bobby@bobby.com> wrote:

>If the 20D does work good as a point & shoot then I'll be able to sell
>my Olympus to my brother (who also loves the camera).

It has a mode that you could set, and hand it to somebody's grandmother,
sure. It's even very obvious, a nice green square. Considering how
versatile this camera is, it's really cool that it has this "auto" of an
auto setting.
April 26, 2005 5:31:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <x-KdnUNDyKwAsdrfRVn-pw@comcast.com>,
Charles Schuler <charleschuler@comcast.net> wrote:

>Yes, it works fine as a P&S. Also, the "P" mode (for Program) is sort of in
>between and you might learn to like that mode. It's automatic but let's you
>easily fiddle with ISO, focus points, aperture, etc.

The ergonomics of the controls for this type of thing is also what makes
the 20D so much better than the Rebel XT. $500 better? For me there
was no contest. The location of the controls stole the show.
April 26, 2005 5:33:37 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <vSI1e.530$WM6.422@okepread07>, Kelly <kbbmjb@hotmail.com> wrote:

>and 2) depending on the size of your current P&S you might want to save it
>as a conveniance camera.

I found myself compelled to buy a Powershot A85 along with my 20D.

I really like that the Powershot has the same basic Canon architecture.
It makes a nice complement, IMHO.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 5:33:38 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

fishbowl@conservatory.com (james) writes:

> In article <vSI1e.530$WM6.422@okepread07>, Kelly <kbbmjb@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> >and 2) depending on the size of your current P&S you might want to save it
> >as a conveniance camera.
>
> I found myself compelled to buy a Powershot A85 along with my 20D.
>
> I really like that the Powershot has the same basic Canon architecture.
> It makes a nice complement, IMHO.

I agree. I have the G2 and my 300d, but I would really rather have
the A85 rather than the G2. 8-) I've recommended A85 to several
friends, and my 70 year old mother friggin LOVES the thing.

Canon electronics, fast lens, it's just a joyful little camera.

The irony is that to get available light pictures that an A85 can get
with a DSLR, you've gotta spend some bucks because you need to get
down to that fast lens they put on the A85 and G series stuff.

With my 550EX flash on board, the G2 routinely takes better shots
than my 300D. The only real downside is that you don't have very
precise control over the focus on the G2, and the shutter lag blows.

Best Regards,
--
Todd H.
http://www.toddh.net/
April 26, 2005 5:42:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <tvI1e.37706$Ux.19417@tornado.texas.rr.com>,
Musty <musty@nospam.net> wrote:

>Yes, it can (ofcourse) - but then why bother with "Auto" mode. The most auto
>that I ever go on my 20D is Av or Tv. I cant imagine why you would want the
>camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter.

I don't get this either. But there are situations where you need to
hand the camera to someone, and let them take a picture with it. And
what's strange about this, well, my Dad had a Rollei. My Mom had an
Argus C-3. Some of my grand-parents had cameras. At least one of my
grand parents had a 4x5 camera at some point and enough of a darkroom to
make contact prints. And none of these people even passingly considered
themselves to be photographers, that was just life.

Okay, so everybody else probably had Brownies. But even some of those
had aperture control, didn't they?

I've played with auto mode a bit on my 20D just to get a feel for the
decisions the meter makes.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 6:52:14 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
> Musty <musty@nospam.net> wrote:
>
>>I cant imagine why you would want the
>>camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter.
>
> I don't get this either.

This is not a flame, but merely a question which may generate some useful
dialog. Assuming an average scene where you want a normal exposure, good
depth of field and a shutter speed high enough to eliminate blur caused by
camera movement, why not trust the Canon electronics, honed since the
introduction of the A-1 in 1978, make the proper decision?

> well, my Dad had a Rollei. My Mom had an Argus C-3

Used and liked your Mom's camera, it was called "the brick" for good and
many reasons. Never liked, and still don't, TLRs such as your Dad's Rollei.

>Some of my grand-parents had cameras. At least one of my
> grand parents had a 4x5 camera at some point and enough of a darkroom to
> make contact prints. And none of these people even passingly considered
> themselves to be photographers, that was just life.

I used a Crown Graphic for sports photography in high school, understand and
anticipate the moment, a long way from a 5fps burst. Now days, everyone who
buys an SLR believes themselves to be a photographer, whatever that is,
while they blissfully record family photo ops and bird pictures.

> Okay, so everybody else probably had Brownies. But even some of those
> had aperture control, didn't they?

Two, sometimes even three, selections.

> I've played with auto mode a bit on my 20D just to get a feel for the
> decisions the meter makes.

And how did the 20D's decisions vary from yours in full auto? Would
choosing a more appropriate Image Zone mode have resulted in the same choice
that you would have made? If you are not trusting the Canon's meter, how
are you determining exposure? Again, not a flame, but a legitimate enquiry
as to how those that downplay auto modes believe they obtain a better
exposure than the camera's electronics.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 11:06:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Tue, 26 Apr 2005 02:52:14 -0400, jfitz <jfitz@bigfoot.com> wrote:
>
> Now days, everyone who
> buys an SLR believes themselves to be a photographer, whatever that is,

I always thought the word referred to a person who takes photographs.
I guess you could try to promote a more restrictive definition, but
-- to what end?

--
Ben Rosengart (212) 741-4400 x215
Sometimes it only makes sense to focus our attention on those
questions that are equal parts trivial and intriguing.
--Josh Micah Marshall
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 11:06:58 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Ben Rosengart" <br+rpdss@panix.com> wrote:
>>jfitz <jfitz@bigfoot.com> wrote:
>>
>> Now days, everyone who
>> buys an SLR believes themselves to be a photographer, whatever that is,
>
> I always thought the word referred to a person who takes photographs.

In the broadest, and not commonly accepted, sense you are most certainly
correct.

> I guess you could try to promote a more restrictive definition, but
> -- to what end?

Duh!! As with any definition, to clarify the meaning of the term. Few who
are clicking away with their disposable cameras would consider themselves
"photographers". In the mind of the masses, and that IS what determines the
meaning of a word in an active language, to be a "photographer" implies a
skill and ART above that which the general public is capable of.
April 26, 2005 11:13:56 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <jZOdncRj4ZCBePDfRVn-rg@comcast.com>,
jfitz <jfitz@bigfoot.com> wrote:
>
>
>"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
> > Musty <musty@nospam.net> wrote:
>>
>>>I cant imagine why you would want the
>>>camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter.
>>
>> I don't get this either.
>
>This is not a flame, but merely a question which may generate some useful
>dialog. Assuming an average scene where you want a normal exposure, good
>depth of field and a shutter speed high enough to eliminate blur caused by
>camera movement, why not trust the Canon electronics, honed since the
>introduction of the A-1 in 1978, make the proper decision?

Hey, I often do. My 20D stays on P or Av mode. Granted, I've only had
it a week, but, I think I know what I'm doing, and more importantly, I
think I understand what the electronics are doing. I appreciate it.

Part of my motivation for going with Canon was the terriffic experience
I had with an AE-1 in the late 70's. For some reason that I've
forgotten, I got a Nikon around 1980. But all my best phtography was
with that Canon. I actually suspect that the Nikon somehow stifled my
creativity. Nothing against Nikon. I liked that camera for technical
reasons (and I'm looking for an FE body now, because I think I want to
shoot some film. My new digital camera is whetting my appetite for
film.)

> > well, my Dad had a Rollei. My Mom had an Argus C-3
>
>Used and liked your Mom's camera, it was called "the brick" for good and
>many reasons. Never liked, and still don't, TLRs such as your Dad's Rollei.


>
>>Some of my grand-parents had cameras. At least one of my
>> grand parents had a 4x5 camera at some point and enough of a darkroom to
>> make contact prints. And none of these people even passingly considered
>> themselves to be photographers, that was just life.
>
>I used a Crown Graphic for sports photography in high school, understand and
>anticipate the moment, a long way from a 5fps burst. Now days, everyone who
>buys an SLR believes themselves to be a photographer, whatever that is,
>while they blissfully record family photo ops and bird pictures.

Hey, bird shots are tough. I get the impression that there's a lot of
amateur erotica being made, and that's driving the market. (I shoot
landscapes and close-up plants, in case you're wondering ;-)

>> I've played with auto mode a bit on my 20D just to get a feel for the
>> decisions the meter makes.
>
>And how did the 20D's decisions vary from yours in full auto?

I don't know yet. I'm just now learning how to use this camera. My
instincts aren't quite getting the results I expect. Digital is not
Film. That's what I'm learning. I'm not disappointed at all; I think
it's interesting to learn something.

>Would
>choosing a more appropriate Image Zone mode have resulted in the same choice
>that you would have made? If you are not trusting the Canon's meter, how
>are you determining exposure?

You have good questions, and the truth is, I don't know yet. I'm just
now learning it. At one time I had an instinct for exposure. I got
good results by dead reckoning, sometimes using an incident meter. Then
again, I used the same camera and the same film every day.

>Again, not a flame, but a legitimate enquiry
>as to how those that downplay auto modes believe they obtain a better
>exposure than the camera's electronics.

Now, I did not mean to disparage the creative zone modes. Those are
quite useful. In fact, I got into this thread saying how handy the
granny mode can be. Then I realized, my granny was probably pretty
skilled with a manual camera. Then again, I wouldn't expect even a
total computer geek like myself to find the shutter speed and aperture
control on this camera immediately.

I think I need to get my hands on an Argus brick and a few hundred feed
of Tri-X.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 11:13:57 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
> I think I need to get my hands on an Argus brick and a few hundred feed
> of Tri-X.

Thanks for your reply in the spirit to which my original post was made. It
is refreshing to get an honest reply to the point of the post, rather than
the posting style, be it bottom or top, a diatribe on the merits of the
camera brand, or attempts to nitpick universally understood terms.
April 26, 2005 11:43:28 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <lIednccJ3enTc_DfRVn-rQ@comcast.com>,
jfitz <jfitz@bigfoot.com> wrote:
>
>
>"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
> > I think I need to get my hands on an Argus brick and a few hundred feed
>> of Tri-X.
>
>Thanks for your reply in the spirit to which my original post was made. It
>is refreshing to get an honest reply to the point of the post, rather than
>the posting style, be it bottom or top, a diatribe on the merits of the
>camera brand, or attempts to nitpick universally understood terms.

I was fortunate enough to attend a middle school that had a camera club.
There was a certain priest who was apparently quite the worldly sort
before joining the priesthood, and he was a magnificent photographer.

Kids would show up with their SLR's, and I must admit I was one of them,
with my AE-1, and most of us wouldn't think anything of his Leica M2,
or his old medium reflex cameras (but everybody really dug the Bealieu
16mm movie camera!)

But his pictures from that damn Leica were often incredible; some of us
learned something from that, others didn't.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 11:43:29 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
> I was fortunate enough to attend a middle school that had a camera club.
> There was a certain priest who was apparently quite the worldly sort
> before joining the priesthood, and he was a magnificent photographer.

In high school I was, among other duties, the photographer for the school
paper. The school camera was a Crown Graphic but the Priest who supervised
the paper had a Leica he had aquired during WWII. I rarely used the Crown
Graphic, preferring my Kodak Pony 135 or Father Brown's Leica when he deemed
to loan it out. Father Brown took magnificient photographs, all of Germany,
which we viewed during his German langauge class. Probably why, even today,
I have zero desire to visit Europe.

> Kids would show up with their SLR's, and I must admit I was one of them,
> with my AE-1, and most of us wouldn't think anything of his Leica M2,

When the AE-1 was introduced I was sorely tempted, but could not
economically justify, moving up from my existing equipment. When the A-1
was introduced I was ready, dumped my manual bodies, and, initially,
acquired an A-1 with an AE-1 as a backup. I still have that early A-1 body,
although it has been refurbished, and it still performs as designed.

> or his old medium reflex cameras (but everybody really dug the Bealieu
> 16mm movie camera!)

For a time, I would have sold my soul for the Super 8 Bealieu. Betamax
prevented me making that mistake.

> But his pictures from that damn Leica were often incredible; some of us
> learned something from that, others didn't.

A picture you do not learn from is one you have not really observed.
Anonymous
April 26, 2005 8:54:26 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote in message
news:RTgbe.84039$A31.66407@fed1read03...
> In article <vSI1e.530$WM6.422@okepread07>, Kelly <kbbmjb@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>and 2) depending on the size of your current P&S you might want to save it
>>as a conveniance camera.
>
> I found myself compelled to buy a Powershot A85 along with my 20D.
>
> I really like that the Powershot has the same basic Canon architecture.
> It makes a nice complement, IMHO.
>

Does it use SD or CF cards? (The Powershot, not the 20D... <G>)

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 1:52:34 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In message <tvI1e.37706$Ux.19417@tornado.texas.rr.com>,
"Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:

>Yes, it can (ofcourse) - but then why bother with "Auto" mode. The most auto
>that I ever go on my 20D is Av or Tv. I cant imagine why you would want the
>camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter.

It would be nice to have a manual aperture and shutter mode, with
variable ISO. Even better would be a settable threshold at which you
would allow the aperture to open up, or the exposure to get longer,
instead of having ultra-low sensor exposures.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 1:52:35 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

JPS@no.komm wrote:
> In message <tvI1e.37706$Ux.19417@tornado.texas.rr.com>,
> "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:
>
>
>>Yes, it can (ofcourse) - but then why bother with "Auto" mode. The most auto
>>that I ever go on my 20D is Av or Tv. I cant imagine why you would want the
>>camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter.
>
>
> It would be nice to have a manual aperture and shutter mode, with
> variable ISO. Even better would be a settable threshold at which you
> would allow the aperture to open up, or the exposure to get longer,
> instead of having ultra-low sensor exposures.

That's an evolution of
http://www.aliasimages.com/CompositionPriority.htm

--
-- r.p.e.35mm user resource: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpe35mmur.htm
-- r.p.d.slr-systems: http://www.aliasimages.com/rpdslrsysur.htm
-- [SI] gallery & rulz: http://www.pbase.com/shootin
-- e-meil: Remove FreeLunch.
April 27, 2005 3:37:48 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Alan Browne wrote:

> JPS@no.komm wrote:
>
>> In message <tvI1e.37706$Ux.19417@tornado.texas.rr.com>,
>> "Musty" <musty@nospam.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>> Yes, it can (ofcourse) - but then why bother with "Auto" mode. The
>>> most auto
>>> that I ever go on my 20D is Av or Tv. I cant imagine why you would
>>> want the
>>> camera to decide the Aperture and Shutter.
>>
>>
>>
>> It would be nice to have a manual aperture and shutter mode, with
>> variable ISO. Even better would be a settable threshold at which you
>> would allow the aperture to open up, or the exposure to get longer,
>> instead of having ultra-low sensor exposures.
>
>
> That's an evolution of
> http://www.aliasimages.com/CompositionPriority.htm


It needs a dynamic range analysis to see if the contrast is low enough
to overexpose for raw processing or not if highlights might be blown.
April 27, 2005 9:51:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <RwAbe.70726$lz2.25689@fed1read07>,
Skip M <shadowcatcher@cox.net> wrote:

>> I found myself compelled to buy a Powershot A85 along with my 20D.
>>
>> I really like that the Powershot has the same basic Canon architecture.
>> It makes a nice complement, IMHO.
>>
>
>Does it use SD or CF cards? (The Powershot, not the 20D... <G>)

Both use CF cards. So I have two cameras and an audio recorder that use
CF cards and/or microdrives. So I can buy lots of CF cards and it
won't be a waste. I had a camera and a notebook that took SD cards, and
I can't stand SD (or that crummy HP camera.)

Here are my first pictures from the A85. All shot around the same
location, mostly with slow shutter, handheld shots, some while walking,
shooting blind from waist level, etc., so don't judge the sharpness
too harshly. This is my attempt at being artistic, not benchmarking the
camera:

http://conservatory.com/photos/A85/20050426/
Anonymous
April 27, 2005 9:51:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"james" <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote in message
news:wLFbe.92101$A31.12675@fed1read03...
> In article <RwAbe.70726$lz2.25689@fed1read07>,
> Skip M <shadowcatcher@cox.net> wrote:
>
>>> I found myself compelled to buy a Powershot A85 along with my 20D.
>>>
>>> I really like that the Powershot has the same basic Canon architecture.
>>> It makes a nice complement, IMHO.
>>>
>>
>>Does it use SD or CF cards? (The Powershot, not the 20D... <G>)
>
> Both use CF cards. So I have two cameras and an audio recorder that use
> CF cards and/or microdrives. So I can buy lots of CF cards and it
> won't be a waste. I had a camera and a notebook that took SD cards, and
> I can't stand SD (or that crummy HP camera.)
>
> Here are my first pictures from the A85. All shot around the same
> location, mostly with slow shutter, handheld shots, some while walking,
> shooting blind from waist level, etc., so don't judge the sharpness
> too harshly. This is my attempt at being artistic, not benchmarking the
> camera:
>
> http://conservatory.com/photos/A85/20050426/

That was my thinking. The point and shoots that I've found attractive all
seem to use SD cards, and with a pretty good sized inventory of CF cards for
my DSLRs, that seemed to be a deal breaker. No point in buying a different
set of cards for another camera if I can avoid it...

--
Skip Middleton
http://www.shadowcatcherimagery.com
April 27, 2005 10:54:11 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <_yGbe.92743$A31.89728@fed1read03>,
james <fishbowl@conservatory.com> wrote:
>
>
>In article <0-idnahhJtEAr_LfRVn-iQ@speakeasy.net>, paul <paul@not.net> wrote:
>>
>>
>>james wrote:
>>>
>>> http://conservatory.com/photos/A85/20050426/
>
>
>I apologize. I re-did it in Jalbum and re-uploaded since posting that
>message:
>
>http://conservatory.com/photos/A85/20050426/

I hope I didn't put you off too much by messing up the upload.
One or two of these images speaks to me, and I would really appreciate
feedback. I didn't realize anyone would read my message so quickly.
Anonymous
April 28, 2005 2:37:32 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In message <0-idnathJtGgrvLfRVn-iQ@speakeasy.net>,
paul <paul@not.net> wrote:


>It needs a dynamic range analysis to see if the contrast is low enough
>to overexpose for raw processing or not if highlights might be blown.

Well, it's not like the existing exposure modes are doing that now, so
there would be no relative loss without it. Would be nice, though.
--

<>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
John P Sheehy <JPS@no.komm>
><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
!