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Can using a GPU with blown capacitors damage PC?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 1, 2012 4:34:18 AM

In a nutshell, I let my brother use my graphics card (Nvidia 8600GT) while I didn't have a PC, he gave it back later, with a couple blown capacitors (thanks bro!), but it still works.

I'm getting a PC tomorrow, and don't really have $$ for a new GPU. Will using the damaged card potentially damage the new computer, or will it just work at a decreased rate? I know this will be concidered a dumb question, but I'm strapped for cash and want to play L4D.
a c 189 U Graphics card
October 1, 2012 8:05:02 AM

Well, with blown capacitors, it shouldn't run in the first place.
October 1, 2012 8:10:54 AM

Perhaps I'm not using the right terminology, but everyone seems to refer to them as capacitors. Not all [of them] are blown, only 2 or 3, and like I said, it does work. So whether it should or not isn't really the question.
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a c 189 U Graphics card
October 1, 2012 8:22:34 AM

I mean you're welcome to try it. Personally I would not, but I mean if it works, it might go alright.

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October 1, 2012 8:30:40 AM
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The only real risk would be trying to pull too many amps through the PCI-E slot on the mobo. A short on the card could cause that to happen. IDK if motherboards have over current protection on the PCI-E slots. Also too much signal voltage from the card damage the PCI-E system on the motherboard.

Chances are, if the card is working currently on a different mobo, it should work on the new one without damaging it. Can you down clock the card to manually protect it and the motherboard?
October 1, 2012 9:07:23 AM

shuffman37 said:
The only real risk would be trying to pull too many amps through the PCI-E slot on the mobo. A short on the card could cause that to happen. IDK if motherboards have over current protection on the PCI-E slots. Also too much signal voltage from the card damage the PCI-E system on the motherboard.

Chances are, if the card is working currently on a different mobo, it should work on the new one without damaging it. Can you down clock the card to manually protect it and the motherboard?


I'm not sure how to go about down-clocking the card, but it sounds like it would be risky. I definitely consider damaging the PCI-E slot as a bad case scenario. Thanks for the answer, maybe I can borrow a GPU from somebody.
October 1, 2012 9:07:39 AM

Best answer selected by CallMeGene.
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