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GPU Choice for Multiple Displays

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 4, 2012 12:27:28 AM

Hi guys, I'm trying to choose a graphics setup for a new computer, and wanted to ask for advice on which GPU I should buy.

I'm trying to stay around $400.

I will likely be using two monitors, each with a resolution of 1920x1080

The system will be used for moderate-heavy photo/video editing using gpu accelerated features on programs such as photoshop. High quality gaming (on a single screen) is also a priority.

System specs as of now will be:

CPU: i7-3770K @4.5 GHz

MOBO: Asus P8Z77-V LK

RAM: 16GB DDR3-1600 RAM

PSU: Corsair 800W

SSD Cache Drive: 60gb corsair ssd cache drive

HDD: 2x 2TB 7200rpm in RAID 0


Thanks for the help!!
a b U Graphics card
October 4, 2012 12:37:34 AM

AMD has been working on Eyefinity for quite a long time (way before nVidia surround), and with their better OpenGL, they have great workstation features. Because of this, many users report that Eyefinity provides a much better experience, although nVidia has been heavily working on their surround technology to bridge this gap.

nVidia has CUDA, which is great for GPU accelerated features.

Both vendors at the moment have great competing solutions, but nVidia will be slightly better in the GPU acceleration department due to its CUDA, although AMD's 7970 GHz Edition will slightly better gaming performance in certain titles.

If I were to recommend cards, here's what I'd look into:
nVidia: GTX 670 (you might find some on sale for $350.00 USD) if not a GTX 660 Ti as it has the same compute power as the GTX 670, because of the same GPU.
AMD: Radeon HD 7970 (not GHz Edition as these are slightly more expensive, although you can find some standard Radeon HD 7970 core clocked at 1000MHz, and memory at 1500MHz+). Personally, I'd pick this over the GTX 660 Ti, because of the bigger memory bus, and higher memory count.

Like always, if you have any question, feel free to ask.
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October 4, 2012 12:37:58 AM

Hmm, I believe a 7970 should be the choice here, especially with OpenGL for Photoshop.

That or a GTX 670.

I just upgraded from a GTX 550 ti that was running my two monitors and now I have a HD 7870 HAWK from MSI that is used for gaming and some video editing.

I would look for a nice Sapphire or MSI 7970 my friend. Which country? I know you used the "$" but I just want to be sure you're from the U.S. ;) 
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October 4, 2012 12:43:17 AM

I'm in the US!

Thanks for the suggestions, I'll look into them :) 

Any thoughts on doing crossfire with two 7850s?
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a b U Graphics card
October 4, 2012 12:46:30 AM

acrazypenguin said:
I'm in the US!

Thanks for the suggestions, I'll look into them :) 

Any thoughts on doing crossfire with two 7850s?

When you Crossfire, you get better performance in games, at the cost of power and heat. Some GPUs scale well (7850 do) in games, but not necessarily in media editing environments. For these reasons, I would recommend only going with one single, powerful card, again like the Radeon HD 7970 or the GTX 670.
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a c 92 U Graphics card
October 4, 2012 1:29:27 AM

For your needs, the 7970 is probably the best card. It is one of the best card for openCL which is what the new photoshops will use as well as adobe's entire creation suite. It is also a very powerful gaming gpu so that no problem as well.
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a b U Graphics card
October 4, 2012 2:03:13 AM

esrever said:
For your needs, the 7970 is probably the best card. It is one of the best card for openCL which is what the new photoshops will use as well as adobe's entire creation suite. It is also a very powerful gaming gpu so that no problem as well.

+1
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October 4, 2012 2:47:30 AM

Excellent, thank you. 7970 it is!

As far as the computer's other specs go, do you guys think it would be up to the task at hand?

BF3 at everything maxed? What about Skyrim?

Is the SSD cache drive really worth it?
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a c 92 U Graphics card
October 4, 2012 3:01:38 AM

The SSD is worth it if you have the money for it, overall loading times are going to be much better for windows and applications you put on there. The other specs looks great.
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a b U Graphics card
October 5, 2012 1:02:53 AM

Speaking from personal experience, I would cache your main drive is your SSD is <60GB. If it's greater, than either allocate 60GB to SSD cache and cache your main drive, or use it for frequent programs/games as well as you main OS boot drive.
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