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Good Sources for Digital Photography Tips

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Anonymous
April 10, 2005 12:36:59 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I'm a recent adopter of digital after retiring my 20 year old film SLR
outfit. Therefore, I don't know squat about enhancing digital photo's...

Are there any good publications out there that address this? Even better,
are there some good on-line resources?

Thanks in advance...
April 10, 2005 5:00:24 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Try this for starters:

http://photoworkshop.com/canon/lessons/


"Kyle Boatright" <kboatright1@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:S-Kdndtfhp646MXfRVn-tQ@comcast.com...
> I'm a recent adopter of digital after retiring my 20 year old film SLR
> outfit. Therefore, I don't know squat about enhancing digital photo's...
>
> Are there any good publications out there that address this? Even better,
> are there some good on-line resources?
>
> Thanks in advance...
>
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 6:27:13 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 01:00:24 GMT, "Dave" <dbnoll@ameritech.net> wrote:

>Try this for starters:
>
>http://photoworkshop.com/canon/lessons/
>
>
>"Kyle Boatright" <kboatright1@comcast.net> wrote in message
>news:S-Kdndtfhp646MXfRVn-tQ@comcast.com...
>> I'm a recent adopter of digital after retiring my 20 year old film SLR
>> outfit. Therefore, I don't know squat about enhancing digital photo's...
>>
>> Are there any good publications out there that address this? Even better,
>> are there some good on-line resources?
>>
>> Thanks in advance...
>>
>
Aint it great Kyle...So there is so much stuff on the web..tutorials,
etc. But, like anything else you need to know what yout looking for.
My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors). Can't praise it enough
for it's readablitiy, parsimony, and usefulness. Beyond that, check on
amazon for used copies of Katrin Eismann's books: "Masking and
Compositing" and "Restoration and Retouching". Betwean these
you'll get a usable grasp of setting up photoshop, workflow and
organization, the basic tools and techniques, key combos, how to's,
etc..

You will find it a bit easier searching out things on the web -
because you have some idea of what your looking for and
a lexicon to employ.

I suggest this rather than screwing around on the web..because
these are organised, concise, and complimentary; and affordable
as well (buy used).

regards and well wishes
Ken
Related resources
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 6:36:05 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <ff2h51lp8lsf127hotq60gcrqu49tgkt89@4ax.com>,
Ken Ellis <kenellis@nycap.rr.com> wrote:
>
>My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
>Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors).

... or, for those not yet prepared to drop $600 or so on an
editor, there's also a version for Photoshop Elements 3.0
(which is only $100, and can often be found even cheaper).
P
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 7:27:42 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 02:36:05 +0000 (UTC), johnf@panix.com (John
Francis) wrote:

>In article <ff2h51lp8lsf127hotq60gcrqu49tgkt89@4ax.com>,
>Ken Ellis <kenellis@nycap.rr.com> wrote:
>>
>>My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
>>Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors).
>
>.. or, for those not yet prepared to drop $600 or so on an
>editor, there's also a version for Photoshop Elements 3.0
>(which is only $100, and can often be found even cheaper).
>P

Excellent idea. In fact, you know i think everytime i buy some imaging
device i get a copy of that. The good thing beyond the savings is that
the concepts remain the same. I think elements would be nice to
start with - especially if free. You can get a pretty good deal on
photoshop 7 these days. I'd take that over elements - and it can
be extremely affordable. The techniques in the books i suggested
will remain valid for a good time to come i think and into a
subsequent release.

rgds
Ken
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 8:42:39 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <0d6h511dsgqtpgccfrm1ec2el7768jgr18@4ax.com>,
Ken Ellis <kenellis@nycap.rr.com> wrote:
>
>You can get a pretty good deal on photoshop 7 these days.
>I'd take that over elements - and it can be extremely affordable.

The one drawback to that approach is that Photoshop 7
is no longer being updated to recognise the RAW file
formats of the newest DSLRs. The version of Adobe
Camera Raw that works in Photoshop CS also works in
Elements 3.0, but not in Photoshop 7 (or Elements 2).

So, unfortunately, Photoshop 7 is not as good a deal
for digital photographers as it may be for other users.
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 9:01:52 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Ken Ellis <kenellis@nycap.rr.com> wrote:

> My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
> Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors). Can't praise it enough
> for it's readablitiy, parsimony, and usefulness.

I second your recommendation.
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 9:40:23 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 04:42:39 +0000 (UTC), johnf@panix.com (John
Francis) wrote:

>In article <0d6h511dsgqtpgccfrm1ec2el7768jgr18@4ax.com>,
>Ken Ellis <kenellis@nycap.rr.com> wrote:
>>
>>You can get a pretty good deal on photoshop 7 these days.
>>I'd take that over elements - and it can be extremely affordable.
>
>The one drawback to that approach is that Photoshop 7
>is no longer being updated to recognise the RAW file
>formats of the newest DSLRs. The version of Adobe
>Camera Raw that works in Photoshop CS also works in
>Elements 3.0, but not in Photoshop 7 (or Elements 2).
>
>So, unfortunately, Photoshop 7 is not as good a deal
>for digital photographers as it may be for other users.
>
Good point. I know i use a cannon util to edit my raw and then have
to convert the file to a tiff. Still, depends on what the original
poster has...and the books are for CS & 7 anyway. So..still my
suggestion as far as reading go.

rgds
Ken
Anonymous
April 10, 2005 3:50:34 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

John Francis wrote:

> In article <ff2h51lp8lsf127hotq60gcrqu49tgkt89@4ax.com>,
> Ken Ellis <kenellis@nycap.rr.com> wrote:
>
>>My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
>>Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors).
>
>
> .. or, for those not yet prepared to drop $600 or so on an
> editor, there's also a version for Photoshop Elements 3.0
> (which is only $100, and can often be found even cheaper).

It can be DL'd for $89.

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Anonymous
April 11, 2005 1:38:12 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 02:27:13 +0000, Ken Ellis wrote:

> Aint it great Kyle...So there is so much stuff on the web..tutorials,
> etc. But, like anything else you need to know what yout looking for.
> My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
> Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors). Can't praise it enough
> for it's readablitiy, parsimony, and usefulness. Beyond that, check on
> amazon for used copies of Katrin Eismann's books: "Masking and
> Compositing" and "Restoration and Retouching". Betwean these
> you'll get a usable grasp of setting up photoshop, workflow and
> organization, the basic tools and techniques, key combos, how to's,
> etc..

I have this book by Kelby and he does offer some good tips. However, I
don't like his writing style - he's too off-the-wall for me. His book also
assumes that you have a working knowledge of PS to begin with - might be a
problem for rank beginners.

There are loads of very good magazines out there as well. Many of them
come with DVD's/CD's loaded with tutorials and trial software, plug-ins,
etc.

--
The good old days start now.
Anonymous
April 11, 2005 5:20:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:38:12 +0200, Roxy d'Urban <not@home.com> wrote:

>On Sun, 10 Apr 2005 02:27:13 +0000, Ken Ellis wrote:
>
>> Aint it great Kyle...So there is so much stuff on the web..tutorials,
>> etc. But, like anything else you need to know what yout looking for.
>> My suggestion is to buy Scott Kelbys "The Photoshop Book for Digital
>> Photographers" (comes in CS or ver 7 flavors). Can't praise it enough
>> for it's readablitiy, parsimony, and usefulness. Beyond that, check on
>> amazon for used copies of Katrin Eismann's books: "Masking and
>> Compositing" and "Restoration and Retouching". Betwean these
>> you'll get a usable grasp of setting up photoshop, workflow and
>> organization, the basic tools and techniques, key combos, how to's,
>> etc..
>
>I have this book by Kelby and he does offer some good tips. However, I
>don't like his writing style - he's too off-the-wall for me. His book also
>assumes that you have a working knowledge of PS to begin with - might be a
>problem for rank beginners.
>
>There are loads of very good magazines out there as well. Many of them
>come with DVD's/CD's loaded with tutorials and trial software, plug-ins,
>etc.

Well, hmmm.... I thought his style interesting and easy reading;
conversational and not a dry and technical tome; but i can understand
your point. Also I had been dabbling in photoshop, and other proggys
for awhile - muddling thru. Perhaps I am overstating it's facile
nature. Your opinion certainly would substatiate that. I can only
say I honestly feel it's "readablity, parsimony, and usefulness"
are for a beginner (although not soley); and a fine choice. In my
mind, I was comparing it to say, Real World Photoshop by Blatner and
Fraser. This I found to be a bit more involved and relatively a harder
(and longer) read. Great book, mind you, but not as much a "down and
dirty". Perhaps it's more app and feature oriented, and less task.
It is a much more detailed work. Apples and oranges I suspect.

True, there are many periodicals which over time cover many of
the same topics to varying degrees of lucidity. I wouldn't suggest
that venue as a mainstay in the learning process however. They
are more like dessert..and perhaps redundant; sometime ill
prepared. A sort of pot-luck (i must be getting hungry).

REM: is that the kind of style thing you dislike?

I think an organised and fundamental approach which focuses
on important tasks is the best. Often, short of an actual course
in the subject, a well organized, thoughtful and well edited
book will serve excellently. Supplement that as you proceed thru it -
on topic - with forrays into the internet and the newsstand.

So for what it's worth, i've had my say; Kelby's and Eismann's books.
I appreciate the dialogue and glimpse through others eyes.

rgds
Ken
Anonymous
April 12, 2005 1:25:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On Mon, 11 Apr 2005 13:20:40 +0000, Ken Ellis wrote:

> Well, hmmm.... I thought his style interesting and easy reading;
> conversational and not a dry and technical tome; but i can understand
> your point. Also I had been dabbling in photoshop, and other proggys
> for awhile - muddling thru. Perhaps I am overstating it's facile
> nature. Your opinion certainly would substatiate that. I can only
> say I honestly feel it's "readablity, parsimony, and usefulness"
> are for a beginner (although not soley); and a fine choice. In my
> mind, I was comparing it to say, Real World Photoshop by Blatner and
> Fraser. This I found to be a bit more involved and relatively a harder
> (and longer) read. Great book, mind you, but not as much a "down and
> dirty". Perhaps it's more app and feature oriented, and less task.
> It is a much more detailed work. Apples and oranges I suspect.

Kelby's book on PS is the only one I have ever bought, but I think it was
on special. His techniques are very helpful but his stand-up comedy
routine, while amusing at first, is incongruous with the subject matter.

> True, there are many periodicals which over time cover many of
> the same topics to varying degrees of lucidity. I wouldn't suggest
> that venue as a mainstay in the learning process however. They
> are more like dessert..and perhaps redundant; sometime ill
> prepared. A sort of pot-luck (i must be getting hungry).
>
> REM: is that the kind of style thing you dislike?

Yep.

> I think an organised and fundamental approach which focuses
> on important tasks is the best. Often, short of an actual course
> in the subject, a well organized, thoughtful and well edited
> book will serve excellently. Supplement that as you proceed thru it -
> on topic - with forrays into the internet and the newsstand.
>
> So for what it's worth, i've had my say; Kelby's and Eismann's books.
> I appreciate the dialogue and glimpse through others eyes.

Another resource that is well worth looking into is the fine newsgroup on
PS. There are many very helpful souls on that forum.

--
The good old days start now.
!