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Graphics: which is used

I understand there are on-board graphics on motherboards, integrated graphics in some cpu's, and video cards. What i don't understand is do they work together or not. Are the motherboard graphics and cpu graphics bypassed if you use a graphics card?

Another thing, I was choosing parts to build a pc on newegg, and i was checking out motherboards and it said on one section "Onboard Video Chipset: depends on CPU". does that mean the onboard video won't work without a specific chipset?

Last thing is, if i plug a monitor into the motherboard vga or dvi plug, and the same with a video card, will it use the separate graphics on the separate monitors?

Thanks in advance
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More about graphics used
  1. Motherboards with onboard graphics do not exist anymore. The options are either the integrated chip in the CPU or a graphics card. The monitor will use whichever graphics it is plugged into. If it is connected to the motherboard it will use the integrated chip; if it is connected to the Graphics Card then it will use the graphics card. Lastly, you can't plug in one monitor to the GPU and the other to the motherboard. If using more than one monitor you must plug it in to the GPU.
  2. Best answer
    Hmm lets see here, where to start..

    Quote:
    Are the motherboard graphics and cpu graphics bypassed if you use a graphics card?

    Yes. Well technically they are disabled but same effect.

    Quote:
    "Onboard Video Chipset: depends on CPU". does that mean the onboard video won't work without a specific chipset?

    What board is this on? Best guess I can give without knowing more would be certain intel cpus don't have an "onchip" gpu (such as the intel I series with an (S) after the model number) Theres also the FM socket you might have seen this on as its onchip gpus are completely dependent on the proc you choose for obvious reasons.

    Quote:
    Last thing is, if i plug a monitor into the motherboard vga or dvi plug, and the same with a video card, will it use the separate graphics on the separate monitors?

    Nope, there is no way to use multiple gpus (and by this I mean solely the onboard + dedicated) in that fashion. You can do this with crossfire or SLi setups, though I'm not sure if the load is split. (Note there is also lucid virtue which is a bit of a different technology, I haven't really done my homework on it yet but from what little I know of it, its basically a form of GPU switching) (pretty much the same way most laptops do it)
  3. mouse24 said:
    Hmm lets see here, where to start..

    Quote:
    Are the motherboard graphics and cpu graphics bypassed if you use a graphics card?

    Yes. Well technically they are disabled but same effect.

    Quote:
    "Onboard Video Chipset: depends on CPU". does that mean the onboard video won't work without a specific chipset?

    What board is this on? Best guess I can give without knowing more would be certain intel cpus don't have an "onchip" gpu (such as the intel I series with an (S) after the model number) Theres also the FM socket you might have seen this on as its onchip gpus are completely dependent on the proc you choose for obvious reasons.

    Quote:
    Last thing is, if i plug a monitor into the motherboard vga or dvi plug, and the same with a video card, will it use the separate graphics on the separate monitors?

    Nope, there is no way to use multiple gpus (and by this I mean solely the onboard + dedicated) in that fashion. You can do this with crossfire or SLi setups, though I'm not sure if the load is split. (Note there is also lucid virtue which is a bit of a different technology, I haven't really done my homework on it yet but from what little I know of it, its basically a form of GPU switching) (pretty much the same way most laptops do it)


    Awesome, thanks for the answer. I'd like to know more about "lucid virtue", i always like to learn more(if you have a link can i have? =D).
  4. Best answer selected by supergohan91.
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