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Should I get 120Hz monitor?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 7, 2012 3:00:51 AM

I honestly don't care about the 120Hz/60Hz debate bit, but the vsync problem sounds like a real bitch. What do you guys think? 7950 /w 3570k OCed

More about : 120hz monitor

October 7, 2012 3:04:40 AM

V-Sync isn't a big issue. It's no less of a problem with the 120Hz displays than it is with 60Hz displays. If you're really worried about it, then I'd recommend that you either get a Nvidia graphics card for adaptive V-Sync or get a motherboard that supports Lucid Virtual V-Sync.
October 7, 2012 3:07:55 AM

luciferano said:
V-Sync isn't a big issue. It's no less of a problem with the 120Hz displays than it is with 60Hz displays. If you're really worried about it, then I'd recommend that you either get a Nvidia graphics card for adaptive V-Sync or get a motherboard that supports Lucid Virtual V-Sync.


I don't see a single 7950 going over 120, unless you're doing fun bits like staring at a wall.
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October 7, 2012 3:10:03 AM

Jeffdom55 said:
I don't see a single 7950 going over 120, unless you're doing fun bits like staring at a wall.


The point of V-Sync is to sync frame rates and refresh rates. Going over 60FPS on a 120Hz display will still leave those out of sync. It'd be better for you to get a Nvidia card for adaptive V-Sync or use virtual V-Sync so you don't have to pay extra for a monitor that you won't use the features on.
October 7, 2012 3:30:29 AM

Quote:
The point of V-Sync is to sync frame rates and refresh rates. Going over 60FPS on a 120Hz display will still leave those out of sync. It'd be better for you to get a Nvidia card for adaptive V-Sync or use virtual V-Sync so you don't have to pay extra for a monitor that you won't use the features on.


What are the advantages of adaptive V-sync over enabling V-sync in an application? Also I have a GTX 670, how do I enable adaptive V-sync?

Thanks
a c 123 C Monitor
October 7, 2012 3:31:57 AM

As someone with a 120hz monitor, I can tell you that adaptive v-sync is useless. You might as well not use v-sync at all. Unless you are getting more than 120 FPS, you will not get any v-sync at all with a 120hz monitor. Adaptive v-sync turns v-sync off when you are below your monitors refresh rate, which still leaves you with tearing despite the common myth.

120hz with v-sync on is very nice from my experience. Not only do you remove tearing, but you don't gear the latency issues associated with 60hz and v-sync.
October 7, 2012 4:47:27 AM

bystander said:
As someone with a 120hz monitor, I can tell you that adaptive v-sync is useless. You might as well not use v-sync at all. Unless you are getting more than 120 FPS, you will not get any v-sync at all with a 120hz monitor. Adaptive v-sync turns v-sync off when you are below your monitors refresh rate, which still leaves you with tearing despite the common myth.

120hz with v-sync on is very nice from my experience. Not only do you remove tearing, but you don't gear the latency issues associated with 60hz and v-sync.


Yeah, 120Hz gaming is great when you use a graphics setup that is consistently ahead of 120PS, but I don't think that that is OP's goal. I'm thinking that a virtual V-Sync option might be ideal unless OP changed his/her mind about playing at settings to stay ahead of 120FPS for a 120Hz display to matter.
a c 123 C Monitor
October 7, 2012 5:16:51 AM

luciferano said:
Yeah, 120Hz gaming is great when you use a graphics setup that is consistently ahead of 120PS, but I don't think that that is OP's goal. I'm thinking that a virtual V-Sync option might be ideal unless OP changed his/her mind about playing at settings to stay ahead of 120FPS for a 120Hz display to matter.


Exactly what is virtual v-sync? Don't you mean "adaptive v-sync"? Adaptive v-sync doesn't do anything if you aren't getting more than your refresh rate at least part of the time. It's also far worse than using regular v-sync with a 120hz monitor. V-sync with a 120hz monitor does not hurt your FPS much at all, and doesn't incur nearly as much latency as you get with 60hz monitors.

Quote from Nvidia's website, and pretty much a quote from what is in the Nvidia Control Panel:
Quote:
NVIDIA Adaptive Vertical Sync: Nothing is more distracting than framerate stuttering and screen tearing. The first tends to occur when framerates are low, the second when framerates are high. Adaptive V-Sync is a smarter way to render frames. At high framerates, V-sync is enabled to eliminate tearing, at low frame rates, it’s disabled to minimize stuttering. It gets rid of distractions so you can get on with gaming.
October 7, 2012 5:39:15 AM

bystander said:
Exactly what is virtual v-sync? Don't you mean "adaptive v-sync"? Adaptive v-sync doesn't do anything if you aren't getting more than your refresh rate at least part of the time. It's also far worse than using regular v-sync with a 120hz monitor. V-sync with a 120hz monitor does not hurt your FPS much at all, and doesn't incur nearly as much latency as you get with 60hz monitors.

Quote from Nvidia's website, and pretty much a quote from what is in the Nvidia Control Panel:
Quote:
NVIDIA Adaptive Vertical Sync: Nothing is more distracting than framerate stuttering and screen tearing. The first tends to occur when framerates are low, the second when framerates are high. Adaptive V-Sync is a smarter way to render frames. At high framerates, V-sync is enabled to eliminate tearing, at low frame rates, it’s disabled to minimize stuttering. It gets rid of distractions so you can get on with gaming.


Virtual V-Sync is a Lucid feature, not Nvidia. It's very different from other types of V-Sync. I'm not sure of how it works, but I've seen it in action and it's great. I think that all Z77 and Z68 boards support it so long as your i5 or i7 has an IGP. Look it up, it's from Lucid and goes with the Hyperformance feature, also from Lucid. It works on both AMD and Nvidia graphics cards and it's nothing like Adaptive V-Sync.
October 7, 2012 6:00:04 AM

I would recommend setting a FPS cap so your GPU doesn't scream like a jet engine trying to render 360+ FPS (it actually happened to my laptop in certain games), and should the FPS drop between 120-60 or 60-30, it won't default to the lowest value unlike V-sync.

However, I don't think all games have an FPS limit setting, and many will require modifying one of their files (including Valve's games based on Source). You would have to research it yourself.
a b C Monitor
October 7, 2012 6:42:05 AM

Upstairs have a 120Hz Asus and a Dell U2410.

For photo editing, the Dell rules
For gaming, the Asus 120 Hz rules

Most games are impressive on the 120Hz with brighter and sharper colors..... Batman AC on twin 560 Ti's (1020MHz) in 3D is a kick..... no tearing, no micro stutter, no issues whatsoever.....colors are sharp and bright .... and not getting anywhere near 120 fps,
October 7, 2012 6:46:24 AM

JackNaylorPE said:
Upstairs have a 120Hz Asus and a Dell U2410.

For photo editing, the Dell rules
For gaming, the Asus 120 Hz rules

Most games are impressive on the 120Hz with brighter and sharper colors..... Batman AC on twin 560 Ti's (1020MHz) in 3D is a kick..... no tearing, no micro stutter, no issues whatsoever.....colors are sharp and bright .... and not getting anywhere near 120 fps,


Tearing and stutter aren't directly caused by the monitor and brighter/sharper colors should have little to nothing to do with the refresh rate of the display either. What's your point?
a c 123 C Monitor
October 7, 2012 7:16:25 AM

A Bad Day said:
I would recommend setting a FPS cap so your GPU doesn't scream like a jet engine trying to render 360+ FPS (it actually happened to my laptop in certain games), and should the FPS drop between 120-60 or 60-30, it won't default to the lowest value unlike V-sync.

However, I don't think all games have an FPS limit setting, and many will require modifying one of their files (including Valve's games based on Source). You would have to research it yourself.


It's been a long time since v-sync dropped you to 30 fps if it doesn't maintain 60 or 60 on a 120hz monitor. It's true that you end up with refreshes that don't occur with a screen update, but without v-sync, you either end up with the same, or only a partial image update, resulting in screen tears.

The only real advantage is due to latency, but on a 120hz monitor, the latency is substantially reduced, even with v-sync on.
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