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Nikon E2N or E2Ns

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Anonymous
April 14, 2005 5:51:13 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Has anyone here ever owned one of these 1996-vintage digital SLRs? How
would you rate it? I know they're seriously deficient compared with
modern digital SLRs, but are they worth bothering with at all?

Apart from cost (~USD11K then) and specs, there doesn't seem to be much
in the way of first-hand experiences of these online. OK, so I guess
that had something to do with the price tag. ;-)

--Chuan

More about : nikon e2n e2ns

Anonymous
April 15, 2005 12:23:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <news-A5EB0D.23510814042005@news-server.bigpond.net.au>,
Chuan Chew <news@rocketsoxdotmailshell.com> wrote:

> Has anyone here ever owned one of these 1996-vintage digital SLRs? How
> would you rate it?

I have tested it (can't remember if it was the E2 or E3) briefly when it
was available new, I worked for the biggest studio in the Netherlands at
that time. I can only remember the incredible bulk and the fact that the
sensor was so small the entire Nikkor line were all telephoto lenses.

>I know they're seriously deficient compared with
> modern digital SLRs, but are they worth bothering with at all?

don't bother.

> Apart from cost (~USD11K then) and specs, there doesn't seem to be much
> in the way of first-hand experiences of these online. OK, so I guess
> that had something to do with the price tag. ;-)

And with the competition I think. At that time most studio work was
already done using Leaf DCB backs, the original 4MP 3-shot version. It
costed even more but it was actually useable for catalog work, where the
big money was made.

If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak DCS 460. They
can be found for an interesting price. Lots of drawbacks compared to a
D70, like no display, scsi-connection, etc. For about the price of a D70
you can find a 660 or 760 model, 1.3x crop-factor, 6MP, based on F5.

Lourens
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 12:23:26 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <smak-D97F20.20232514042005@news.euronet.nl>,
Lourens Smak <smak@wanadoo.nl> wrote:
>In article <news-A5EB0D.23510814042005@news-server.bigpond.net.au>,
> Chuan Chew <news@rocketsoxdotmailshell.com> wrote:
>
>> Has anyone here ever owned one of these 1996-vintage digital SLRs? How
>> would you rate it?
>
>I have tested it (can't remember if it was the E2 or E3) briefly when it
>was available new, I worked for the biggest studio in the Netherlands at
>that time. I can only remember the incredible bulk and the fact that the
>sensor was so small the entire Nikkor line were all telephoto lenses.

Hmm ... that one I don't know, but it would seem to be (based on
the above) a lot less capable than the NC2000e/c (Nikon N90s converted
to digital by Kodak for the AP.) Especially the crop factor.

>>I know they're seriously deficient compared with
>> modern digital SLRs, but are they worth bothering with at all?
>
>don't bother.

I got quite a bit of use out of the NC2000e/c which I mentioned
above -- but the D70 eclipses it in all but in speed of autofocus (a
function of the N90s body used as the starting point).

[ ... ]

>If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak DCS 460. They
>can be found for an interesting price. Lots of drawbacks compared to a
>D70, like no display, scsi-connection, etc. For about the price of a D70
>you can find a 660 or 760 model, 1.3x crop-factor, 6MP, based on F5.

Tbe NC2000e/c was SCSI as well -- but I found that to be no
problem. The media was PCMCIA hard disk drives -- a *lot* more fragile
than CF cards (which would *not* work -- even in an adaptor card).
Resolution was 1.3 MP, and about the best crop factor of the group
of cameras converted by Kodak back then.

But it is *heavy* -- the "back" with the digital sensor extends
down to about the normal height of the camera body below the actual
body. A *built-in* pack of 8 NiCad or NiMH batteries -- no practical
way to remove them and swap in a new set (other than with a screwdriver --
not what you want to do in the field. Among the other features was an
ability to make voice annotations by pressing a button and talking into
what looks like the thread holes from a shirt button on the back). No
easy way to reset the frame counter to zero when swapping PCMCIA drives,
so you wind up with image files starting with somewhere between 0000 and
0990 (They went in steps of 10, to allow file names for the voice files
in between.) Since the camera could take about 227 shots on a 340 MB
PCMCIA disk drive, you would wind up with a sequence like:

0960 0970 0980 0990 0000 ... 0950 1000 1010 ...,

which made for fun sorting them into chronological order. And, when you
changed to a new PCMCIA, the sequence would repeat (from wherever you
were in the number sequence, so a day's shooting could have several
shots with the same file name.

Add to this a unique "RAW" format (the *only* choice in the
camera) which had to be converted with a TWAIN plug-in available only
from Kodak -- and *only* for Windows or Mac versions of PhotoShop.

Another feature which I never enabled was the ability to
transfer the images back to the "office" via a cell phone. The feature
required an extra cost option -- partly hardware to connect to the cell
phone, and partly software for the "office" to recieve and store the
images.

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
April 15, 2005 4:04:16 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"Lourens Smak" <smak@wanadoo.nl> wrote in message
news:smak-D97F20.20232514042005@news.euronet.nl...
> In article <news-A5EB0D.23510814042005@news-server.bigpond.net.au>,
> Chuan Chew <news@rocketsoxdotmailshell.com> wrote:
>
> > Has anyone here ever owned one of these 1996-vintage digital SLRs? How
> > would you rate it?
>
> I have tested it (can't remember if it was the E2 or E3) briefly when it
> was available new, I worked for the biggest studio in the Netherlands at
> that time. I can only remember the incredible bulk and the fact that the
> sensor was so small the entire Nikkor line were all telephoto lenses.
>
> >I know they're seriously deficient compared with
> > modern digital SLRs, but are they worth bothering with at all?
>
> don't bother.
>
> > Apart from cost (~USD11K then) and specs, there doesn't seem to be much
> > in the way of first-hand experiences of these online. OK, so I guess
> > that had something to do with the price tag. ;-)
>
> And with the competition I think. At that time most studio work was
> already done using Leaf DCB backs, the original 4MP 3-shot version. It
> costed even more but it was actually useable for catalog work, where the
> big money was made.
>
> If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak DCS 460. They
> can be found for an interesting price. Lots of drawbacks compared to a
> D70, like no display, scsi-connection, etc. For about the price of a D70
> you can find a 660 or 760 model, 1.3x crop-factor, 6MP, based on F5.
>
> Lourens

Did the 660 or 760 meter with non-AF lenses?

George
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 3:30:00 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"George" <nowhere@newsonly.com> writes:

> "Lourens Smak" <smak@wanadoo.nl> wrote in message
> news:smak-D97F20.20232514042005@news.euronet.nl...
>> In article <news-A5EB0D.23510814042005@news-server.bigpond.net.au>,
>> Chuan Chew <news@rocketsoxdotmailshell.com> wrote:
>>
>> > Has anyone here ever owned one of these 1996-vintage digital SLRs? How
>> > would you rate it?
>>
>> I have tested it (can't remember if it was the E2 or E3) briefly when it
>> was available new, I worked for the biggest studio in the Netherlands at
>> that time. I can only remember the incredible bulk and the fact that the
>> sensor was so small the entire Nikkor line were all telephoto lenses.
>>
>> >I know they're seriously deficient compared with
>> > modern digital SLRs, but are they worth bothering with at all?
>>
>> don't bother.
>>
>> > Apart from cost (~USD11K then) and specs, there doesn't seem to be much
>> > in the way of first-hand experiences of these online. OK, so I guess
>> > that had something to do with the price tag. ;-)
>>
>> And with the competition I think. At that time most studio work was
>> already done using Leaf DCB backs, the original 4MP 3-shot version. It
>> costed even more but it was actually useable for catalog work, where the
>> big money was made.
>>
>> If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak DCS 460. They
>> can be found for an interesting price. Lots of drawbacks compared to a
>> D70, like no display, scsi-connection, etc. For about the price of a D70
>> you can find a 660 or 760 model, 1.3x crop-factor, 6MP, based on F5.
>>
>> Lourens
>
> Did the 660 or 760 meter with non-AF lenses?

They should; they're based on the F5 body, which does.
--
David Dyer-Bennet, <mailto:D d-b@dd-b.net>, <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/&gt;
RKBA: <http://noguns-nomoney.com/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/carry/&gt;
Pics: <http://dd-b.lighthunters.net/&gt; <http://www.dd-b.net/dd-b/SnapshotAlbum/&gt;
Dragaera/Steven Brust: <http://dragaera.info/&gt;
Anonymous
April 15, 2005 8:59:06 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <z4H7e.6320$c42.1657@fe07.lga>,
"George" <nowhere@newsonly.com> wrote:

> Did the 660 or 760 meter with non-AF lenses?

It uses a standard F5, so that means it can meter with non-AF Ais
lenses, but I think it will have to be adapted to use non-Ais lenses.

The Olympus E1 with Nikkor-adapter can also meter with every Nikkor ever
made. (but the sensor is smaller than the Nikon DX format) The lens will
stop-down but it will even work in A-mode.

Lourens.
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 2:52:36 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Lourens Smak <smak@wanadoo.nl> writes:
> If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak
> DCS 460. They can be found for an interesting price.
> Lots of drawbacks compared to a D70, like no display,
> scsi-connection, etc.

I love mine!
http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/dcs460.html

It is certainly different to work with than more modern cameras.
It takes its time writing to the hard drive, which slows down your
pace, and it is a heavy beast - but this just means you need to plan
your shots better.

The SCSI is not a big issue if you have a laptop that accepts PCMCIA
type III card. You simply plug the PCMCIA from the camera into the
computer, and it appears like any other hard drive.

The original Kodak software that came with the camera doesn't run on
Windows/XP, but PS CS ACS do a great job with the RAW format.

The biggest drawbacks with the camera is the low sensitivity of the
sensor (ISO 80 only) and that its buffer only holds two images. Some
may also dislike its bulk.

The good things about it is the low crop (1.3x), that it meters with
most older Nikkors, that there is no shutter delay (just like a film
SLR) and that it has retained most of the great features on the Nikon
N90s, including a fast and precise autofocus, very good light
metering.

Until I can afford a D2x (not very soon I am afraid) I'll keep it
around to be able to meter with my non-CPU Nikkors. It is a shame
that Nikon left this feature out of all its non-pro bodies after the
N90s.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 3:05:17 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Lourens Smak <smak@wanadoo.nl> writes:
> If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak
> DCS 460. They can be found for an interesting price.
> Lots of drawbacks compared to a D70, like no display,
> scsi-connection, etc.

I love mine!
http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/dcs460.html

It is certainly different to work with than more modern cameras.
It takes its time writing to the hard drive, which slows down your
pace, and it is a heavy beast - but this just means you need to plan
your shots better.

The SCSI is not a big issue if you have a laptop that accepts PCMCIA
type III cards. You simply plug the PCMCIA from the camera into the
computer, and it appears like any other hard drive.

The original Kodak software that came with the camera doesn't run on
Windows/XP, but ACR (PS CS) do a great job with its RAW format.

The biggest drawbacks with the camera is the low sensitivity of the
sensor (ISO 80 only) and that its buffer only holds two images. Some
may also dislike its bulk.

The good things about it is the low crop (1.3x), that it meters with
most older Nikkors, that there is no shutter delay (just like a film
SLR) and that it has retained most of the great features on the Nikon
N90s, including a fast and precise autofocus, and a very good light
metering system.

Until I can afford a D2x (not very soon I am afraid) I'll keep it
around to be able to meter with my non-CPU Nikkors. It is a shame
that Nikon left this feature out of all its non-pro bodies after the
N90s.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 6, 2005 8:19:53 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <q5u0lg3fe3.fsf@seitseman.ifi.uio.no>,
Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>Lourens Smak <smak@wanadoo.nl> writes:
>> If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak
>> DCS 460. They can be found for an interesting price.
>> Lots of drawbacks compared to a D70, like no display,
>> scsi-connection, etc.
>
>I love mine!
> http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/dcs460.html
>
>It is certainly different to work with than more modern cameras.
>It takes its time writing to the hard drive, which slows down your
>pace, and it is a heavy beast - but this just means you need to plan
>your shots better.

I've got a similar one -- the NC2000e/c (the one made for the
AP).

>The SCSI is not a big issue if you have a laptop that accepts PCMCIA
>type III card. You simply plug the PCMCIA from the camera into the
>computer, and it appears like any other hard drive.

And -- you can install PCMCIA slots into regular Windows
computers as well (I've got one in my Windows 2K box -- needed for the
plugin for PhotoShop for converting the weird RAW format which Kodak
used.

For that matter -- I have a couple of PCMCIA-SCSI adaptors, so I
can run them in my Sun workstations, too. (As well as using a PCMCIA-FC
adaptor to read the cards out of the D70 which I also use.

But the SCSI interface is also needed -- to set the TOD clock in
the camera, if for no other reason. None of the cameras seem to
understand DST, so you need to correct the time twice a year, aside from
adjusting for drift.

>The original Kodak software that came with the camera doesn't run on
>Windows/XP, but PS CS ACS do a great job with the RAW format.

The free "dcraw" program for unix machines handles most RAW
formats, but not (quite) the one for the NC2000e/c. It gets the format
right, so you get recognizable images, but not the color -- leaves turn
out a magenta color. :-) I guess that I should make an image or two
available for the author of the program, to get that added to the list.
(It thinks the camera is the NC2000*f* instead.

>The biggest drawbacks with the camera is the low sensitivity of the
>sensor (ISO 80 only) and that its buffer only holds two images. Some
>may also dislike its bulk.

Hmm ... the NC2000e/c goes up to 1600 ISO -- but rather noisy at
that sensitivity. You change it by changing the camera's idea of the
ISO. You can go beyond the limits of the sensor, but it will drop back
to the nearest actual sensor limit after one shot.

>The good things about it is the low crop (1.3x), that it meters with
>most older Nikkors, that there is no shutter delay (just like a film
>SLR) and that it has retained most of the great features on the Nikon
>N90s, including a fast and precise autofocus, very good light
>metering.

Agreed. Out of curiosity -- what features of the N90s does it
*not* retain? I've never had the film back for mine, so I don't know
what might be there.

>Until I can afford a D2x (not very soon I am afraid) I'll keep it
>around to be able to meter with my non-CPU Nikkors. It is a shame
>that Nikon left this feature out of all its non-pro bodies after the
>N90s.

I agree with that. It *might* have been left out of the D70
because of the polycarbonate body making the mounting of the sensor a
possible point of weakness?

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 4:19:08 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:
> In article <q5u0lg3fe3.fsf@seitseman.ifi.uio.no>,
> Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>> Lourens Smak <smak@wanadoo.nl> writes:

>>> If you want something old and cheap, look for a used Kodak
>>> DCS 460. They can be found for an interesting price.
>>> Lots of drawbacks compared to a D70, like no display,
>>> scsi-connection, etc.

>> I love mine!
>> http://folk.uio.no/gisle/photo/dcs460.html

> I've got a similar one -- the NC2000e/c (the one made for the AP).

>> The SCSI is not a big issue if you have a laptop that accepts
>> PCMCIA type III card. You simply plug the PCMCIA from the camera
>> into the computer, and it appears like any other hard drive.

> But the SCSI interface is also needed -- to set the TOD clock in the
> camera, if for no other reason. None of the cameras seem to
> understand DST, so you need to correct the time twice a year, aside
> from adjusting for drift.

I use mine without a SCSI interface. I can live with the timestamp
metadata embedded in the images being bogus.

>> The good things about it is the low crop (1.3x), that it meters
>> with most older Nikkors, that there is no shutter delay (just like
>> a film SLR) and that it has retained most of the great features on
>> the Nikon N90s, including a fast and precise autofocus, very good
>> light metering.

> Agreed. Out of curiosity -- what features of the N90s does it *not*
> retain?

- There is no way to get more than 30 seconds exposure in bulb mode.
- No TTL flash metering (but auto works fine with my SB-28).
- No multiple exposure (but that's easy to do in Photoshop).
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 4:19:09 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <q5ll6s2e1v.fsf@fire.ifi.uio.no>,
Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:
>> In article <q5u0lg3fe3.fsf@seitseman.ifi.uio.no>,
>> Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>>> Lourens Smak <smak@wanadoo.nl> writes:

[ ... ]

>> But the SCSI interface is also needed -- to set the TOD clock in the
>> camera, if for no other reason. None of the cameras seem to
>> understand DST, so you need to correct the time twice a year, aside
>> from adjusting for drift.
>
>I use mine without a SCSI interface. I can live with the timestamp
>metadata embedded in the images being bogus.

O.K. I like to have it correct, but I agree that it really does
not matter in most cases.

Since I already had a SCSI card in the Windows box (to talk to
various Sun things like tape drives), that was not a problem for me.

>>> The good things about it is the low crop (1.3x), that it meters
>>> with most older Nikkors, that there is no shutter delay (just like
>>> a film SLR) and that it has retained most of the great features on
>>> the Nikon N90s, including a fast and precise autofocus, very good
>>> light metering.
>
>> Agreed. Out of curiosity -- what features of the N90s does it *not*
>> retain?
>
>- There is no way to get more than 30 seconds exposure in bulb mode.

Hmm ... I just tried it with my NC2000e/c, and got up to 120
seconds before I ran out of patience. Without the remote connected,
your index finger does get tired after a while. :-)

>- No TTL flash metering (but auto works fine with my SB-28).

Agreed.

>- No multiple exposure (but that's easy to do in Photoshop).

Was there a way to do that in the film version of the N90s?

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 5:31:49 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 6 May 2005 16:19:53 -0400, dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols)
wrote:

> The free "dcraw" program for unix machines handles most RAW
>formats, but not (quite) the one for the NC2000e/c. It gets the format
>right, so you get recognizable images, but not the color -- leaves turn
>out a magenta color. :-)

Unfortunately, the magenta rendition of certain subjects was one of
the major problems with the early Kodak digital professional cameras.
The DCS410 and 420 had the same problems. See Rob Galbraith's site
for more info.
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 4:18:39 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:
> Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>> dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:
>>> Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:

>>>> The good things about it is the low crop (1.3x), that it meters
>>>> with most older Nikkors, that there is no shutter delay (just like
>>>> a film SLR) and that it has retained most of the great features on
>>>> the Nikon N90s, including a fast and precise autofocus, very good
>>>> light metering.

>>> Agreed. Out of curiosity -- what features of the N90s does it *not*
>>> retain?

>> There is no way to get more than 30 seconds exposure in bulb mode.

> Hmm ... I just tried it with my NC2000e/c, and got up to 120 seconds
> before I ran out of patience. Without the remote connected, your
> index finger does get tired after a while. :-)

Have you examined the picture? On the DCS460, the shutter stays open
as long as you keep the shutter depressed, but after 30 seconds the
image is transferred from the sensor to the hard drive - and that is
what limits the length of the exposure.

>> No multiple exposure (but that's easy to do in Photoshop).

> Was there a way to do that in the film version of the N90s?

Yes, with the MF-26 Multi-Control Back. As the Kodak digtal version
of the camera can't use this back (for obvious reasons) you loose
/all/ the MF-26 functions:

Data imprint: Date, time, frame number, serial up-count, fixed
number, shutter speed/aperture.
World Clock: 24 time zones, daylight saving.
Interval Timer: Specified intervals up to 99 hours 59 minutes and
59 seconds, and up to 99 frames.
Long Exposure: Exposure duration up to 99 hours 59 minutes and
59 seconds.
Auto-Sequence: Stop film advance after desired number of frames
in continuous motor shooting.
All-Mode Bracketing: Shoot from 3 to 19 frames, each with a different
exposure. Compensation values range from 1/3 to 1/2,
2/3, 1, 1-1/3, 1-1/2, 1-2/3 and 2 EV steps. All
auto modes.
Flash Bracketing: Range from 1/3 to 1/2, 2/3, 1, 1-1/3, 1-1/2, 1-2/3
and 2 EV steps.
Multiple exposure: Up to 19 exposures on one frame.
Focus Priority: Camera waits until subject is at prefocused distance
and the shutter is automatically released the moment
the subject is in focus.
AE/AF-Lock: Enables simultaneous or independent operation of AE
and AF Lock functions from one control button.
Custom Reset: Select either a custom setting ot the original
factory setting for the Instant Reset Operation.
Flash Output Compensation: Lets you compensate the flash output by
-3EV to 3 EV in 1/3 steps.

Source: http://web.mit.edu/cai/www/nikon/MF26.html
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 4:29:56 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

McLeod <cerveza@xplornet.com> writes:
> On 6 May 2005 16:19:53 -0400, DoN. Nichols wrote:

>> The free "dcraw" program for unix machines handles most RAW
>> formats, but not (quite) the one for the NC2000e/c. It gets the
>> format right, so you get recognizable images, but not the color --
>> leaves turn out a magenta color. :-)

> Unfortunately, the magenta rendition of certain subjects was one of
> the major problems with the early Kodak digital professional cameras.
> The DCS410 and 420 had the same problems. See Rob Galbraith's site
> for more info.

On by DCS460, I've found that using a Tiffen "hot mirror" (IR blocking
filter) fixes this. It also keeps down the noise in the blue channel.
I always have a hot mirror filter in place when I shoot with the
DCS460.
--
- gisle hannemyr [ gisle{at}hannemyr.no - http://folk.uio.no/gisle/ ]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Kodak DCS460, Canon Powershot G5, Olympus 2020Z
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 8:41:43 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <mhko719acdcqjjsj6kcafco4r1oqh7takv@4ax.com>,
McLeod <cerveza@xplornet.com> wrote:
>On 6 May 2005 16:19:53 -0400, dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols)
>wrote:
>
>> The free "dcraw" program for unix machines handles most RAW
>>formats, but not (quite) the one for the NC2000e/c. It gets the format
>>right, so you get recognizable images, but not the color -- leaves turn
>>out a magenta color. :-)
>
>Unfortunately, the magenta rendition of certain subjects was one of
>the major problems with the early Kodak digital professional cameras.
>The DCS410 and 420 had the same problems. See Rob Galbraith's site
>for more info.

But I do have a "Hot Mirror" filter on each of the lenses which
I use with the camera.

And the same image, when converted by the plugin from Kodak for
PhotoShop does show proper green leaves.

All other colors are also wrong, FWIW.

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
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--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 7, 2005 8:57:50 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <q5oebn730g.fsf@kolme.ifi.uio.no>,
Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:
>> Gisle Hannemyr <gisle+news@ifi.uio.no> wrote:
>>> dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) writes:

[ ... ]

>>>> Agreed. Out of curiosity -- what features of the N90s does it *not*
>>>> retain?
>
>>> There is no way to get more than 30 seconds exposure in bulb mode.
>
>> Hmm ... I just tried it with my NC2000e/c, and got up to 120 seconds
>> before I ran out of patience. Without the remote connected, your
>> index finger does get tired after a while. :-)
>
>Have you examined the picture?

No -- I did it with the body cap in place, so there was no real
image -- but the shot was full of noise at that 120 second setting.

> On the DCS460, the shutter stays open
>as long as you keep the shutter depressed, but after 30 seconds the
>image is transferred from the sensor to the hard drive - and that is
>what limits the length of the exposure.

O.K. IIRC, I did not see disk activity until I released the
shutter release.

>>> No multiple exposure (but that's easy to do in Photoshop).
>
>> Was there a way to do that in the film version of the N90s?
>
>Yes, with the MF-26 Multi-Control Back. As the Kodak digtal version
>of the camera can't use this back (for obvious reasons) you loose
>/all/ the MF-26 functions:
>
>Data imprint: Date, time, frame number, serial up-count, fixed
> number, shutter speed/aperture.

Of course, most of this gets included in the data kept with the
image. I wrote a C program to extract this on my unix box from the raw
".TIF" files.

======================================================================
KODAK NC2000F FILE VERSION 3
051998 4151218
Date: 2005:05:07 15:41:04
Exposure#: [ 4]
ISO: 200
Aperture: F4
Shutter: 60
Lens (mm): 50
Exposure: P
Program: SP
Exp Comp: 0.0
Meter area: Cntr
Flash sync: Norm
Drive mode: S
Focus mode: C
Focus area: Spot
Distance: ??
======================================================================

>World Clock: 24 time zones, daylight saving.

That would be nice.

>Interval Timer: Specified intervals up to 99 hours 59 minutes and
> 59 seconds, and up to 99 frames.

As would that -- though I could put an intervalometer into the
remote jack (same as the charger jack) to get that effect.

>Long Exposure: Exposure duration up to 99 hours 59 minutes and
> 59 seconds.

That one, I can't do -- but apparently, the sensor can't
integrate even as long as 120 seconds without getting overwhelmed by
noise -- which is probably why the limit on your camera.

>Auto-Sequence: Stop film advance after desired number of frames
> in continuous motor shooting.

O.K. Useful with film.

>All-Mode Bracketing: Shoot from 3 to 19 frames, each with a different
> exposure. Compensation values range from 1/3 to 1/2,
> 2/3, 1, 1-1/3, 1-1/2, 1-2/3 and 2 EV steps. All
> auto modes.

Nice.

>Flash Bracketing: Range from 1/3 to 1/2, 2/3, 1, 1-1/3, 1-1/2, 1-2/3
> and 2 EV steps.

Again, nice.

>Multiple exposure: Up to 19 exposures on one frame.

*This* one causes me to re-think some things about the N90s
body. I had thought that the motor film advance was also what powered
the shutter retension and the mirror return. If it is *not* necessary
for the film advance to run, why did they not turn it off in the custom
firmware for the Kodak digital mod -- it would have saved power,
improved frame rate, and made for more quiet operation in digital.

>Focus Priority: Camera waits until subject is at prefocused distance
> and the shutter is automatically released the moment
> the subject is in focus.

I thought that was in the N90s body.

>AE/AF-Lock: Enables simultaneous or independent operation of AE
> and AF Lock functions from one control button.

O.K. Though I think that I prefer having them as separate
buttons.

>Custom Reset: Select either a custom setting ot the original
> factory setting for the Instant Reset Operation.

O.K.

>Flash Output Compensation: Lets you compensate the flash output by
> -3EV to 3 EV in 1/3 steps.

Nice.

Thanks,
DoN.

--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
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