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Monitors and peripherals

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 8, 2012 4:57:00 AM

Build's coming together real nicely, parts coming in wenesday, but when I looked at my mouse and keyboard I thought to myself "Is this mouse and keyboard up to par with a gaming rig?"

Bottom line, I have a wireless logitech keyboard and mouse. They keyboard I have is this one: http://www.bestbuy.com/site/Logitech+-+K360+Wireless+Ke... which I purchased from Best Buy couple of months ago. The mouse is a bit aged, but it says "high performance" at the bottom if that means anything. Do I need to upgrade my peripherals? Or maybe just my mouse, and if so, which gaming mouse would you recommend?

Also, can someone elaborate the difference between 5ms and 2ms? Or is there really not much difference? Thank you for taking the time! :D 

Additional info: 7950/3570k

More about : monitors peripherals

October 8, 2012 5:31:43 AM

Any budget in mind for the mouse? Preferences? W/less or wired? Type of games it will be used for, fps or rpg (rpg mice have more butons)There are a great number of 'gaming' mice out there. Popular brands are logitech g series, razer, saitek, rocat, just to name a few. But without knowing more I would suggest, if you're a palm gripper, something like the logitech g500 http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... or g700 if you want wireless (I'm using this mouse on my gaming rig) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or if you're a finger gripper something like the RAT series
RAT 7 (this pulls duty on my gaming lappy, great mouse, great conversation piece too) http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

or RAT 9 w/less http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

As for the difference between 5m/s and 2m/s. 5m/s (milliseconds) monitors take 3m/s longer to change a pixel from one state to another and back again. It's a measure of how fast your picture can change. General consensus seems to be that 5m/s is fine for gaming.

Good luck.
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October 8, 2012 5:55:01 AM

I highly recommend avoiding wireless peripherals - too many things could go wrong, from the connection cutting out to the batteries dying. (Plus wireless mice are a lot heavier due to the batteries.)

If you're not going to be playing across the room, then I'd avoid wireless. Also, personally, I don't think gaming accessories have to be that expensive - my five button microsoft Comfort 6000 feels a lot more comfortable, and gets me headshots easier, than my friend's rat 7. Yes, I know they're extremely customizable, but I'd rather have a cheap mouse that performs just as well than I would an expensive one that has more features that I wouldn't usually use.

The one exception I make to this is a mechanical keyboard. If you can afford one, get it - it makes a world of difference. If you can't, the $20 Microsoft Comfort Curve 2000 is extremely comfortable, reliable, and not so ergonomic that it prevents you from using a laptop keyboard.

(I like Microsoft because they're usually a fair bit cheaper, of good quality, and have good software. I dislike Logitech, because their software causes me to go into conniptions. Also, finally, stay away from Razor like the plague - they're extremely shoddily made, so you get a good product for cheap that only lasts 6 months.)

Again, you don't need 'gaming' peripherals unless you want the flash - a decently made mouse and keyboard will serve you just as well. For $40, you can get the following, which will serve you just fine, and likely last longer:

[Mouse, though get an Intellimouse Explorer 3.0 if you can find it.]
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

[Keyboard]
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


a little black duck said:
As for the difference between 5m/s and 2m/s. 5m/s (milliseconds) monitors take 3m/s longer to change a pixel from one state to another and back again. It's a measure of how fast your picture can change. General consensus seems to be that 5m/s is fine for gaming.


Sorry mate, you fell into the exact trap they wanted you to do. 99% of the time, when a monitor is advertised as being 2ms, that's the Grey-to-Grey time - meaning its color change time is still the standard 5ms. There ARE monitors that perform faster, most notably 120Hz monitors, but for a standard monitor, 5ms is fine - don't pay more for a 2ms that's really the exact same. [Though if you can afford it, a 120Hz monitor is a beautiful thing for gaming.]
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October 8, 2012 9:32:32 AM

DarkSable said:
I highly recommend avoiding wireless peripherals - too many things could go wrong, from the connection cutting out to the batteries dying. (Plus wireless mice are a lot heavier due to the batteries.)

If you're not going to be playing across the room, then I'd avoid wireless. Also, personally, I don't think gaming accessories have to be that expensive - my five button microsoft Comfort 6000 feels a lot more comfortable, and gets me headshots easier, than my friend's rat 7. Yes, I know they're extremely customizable, but I'd rather have a cheap mouse that performs just as well than I would an expensive one that has more features that I wouldn't usually use.

The one exception I make to this is a mechanical keyboard. If you can afford one, get it - it makes a world of difference. If you can't, the $20 Microsoft Comfort Curve 2000 is extremely comfortable, reliable, and not so ergonomic that it prevents you from using a laptop keyboard.

(I like Microsoft because they're usually a fair bit cheaper, of good quality, and have good software. I dislike Logitech, because their software causes me to go into conniptions. Also, finally, stay away from Razor like the plague - they're extremely shoddily made, so you get a good product for cheap that only lasts 6 months.)

Again, you don't need 'gaming' peripherals unless you want the flash - a decently made mouse and keyboard will serve you just as well. For $40, you can get the following, which will serve you just fine, and likely last longer:

[Mouse, though get an Intellimouse Explorer 3.0 if you can find it.]
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

[Keyboard]
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...




Sorry mate, you fell into the exact trap they wanted you to do. 99% of the time, when a monitor is advertised as being 2ms, that's the Grey-to-Grey time - meaning its color change time is still the standard 5ms. There ARE monitors that perform faster, most notably 120Hz monitors, but for a standard monitor, 5ms is fine - don't pay more for a 2ms that's really the exact same. [Though if you can afford it, a 120Hz monitor is a beautiful thing for gaming.]

I realise the measurement is grey to grey and not black, white, black. But the increments used to measure both are the same i.e. milliseconds. Also, they rarely publish the bwb figures (which are usually considerably higher) But whether the pixel state changes from g2g or bwb it is still the speed at which it's state has changed. And response time has little to do with refresh rate.
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October 8, 2012 9:52:32 AM

I honestly like this mouse and use it everyday for gaming.

Although, to me gaming mouses don't help me at all. Most of my friends have high end gaming mouses and I ball them up all day everyday with this cheap mouse :p 

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Again this is my opinion and I like it. Cant go wrong for 10 bucks?
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October 8, 2012 8:32:19 PM

I see. So what you're all saying is ditch the wireless peripherals?
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October 9, 2012 12:18:54 AM

Bit confused, considering you contradicted eachother. :p 
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October 9, 2012 12:40:37 AM

Jeffdom55 said:
Bit confused, considering you contradicted eachother. :p 

If you like wireless peripherals then keep using them, you'll be fine as long as the batteries are charged, I never had a problem when I used a logitech wireless mouse for gaming.

Don't base your choice on what we say, do what makes you feel comfortable.

If your comfortable with what you have right now, then save the cash or put it towards another part for your build.

:D 
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October 9, 2012 12:43:24 AM

I'll try out that mouse you recommended. I do have smaller hands, is the mouse too big? Only concern I have really.
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October 9, 2012 1:13:26 AM

Jeffdom55 said:
I'll try out that mouse you recommended. I do have smaller hands, is the mouse too big? Only concern I have really.

I wouldn't recommend it if you have small hands, it's a little for the larger hands I guess.
Although, when I first used it I thought it felt a little weird for the first 30 minutes of use but am now 100% use to the feel and I enjoy it very much.

Otherwise, I really don't have another mouse I can recommend to you sorry :( 
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October 9, 2012 1:45:27 AM

I like wireless and they do just fine for gaming. Maybe there is 5 extra microseconds of lag, but it's nothing compared to your network lag. As for batteries, I get plenty of warning and only once has it happened mid game. I guess I am not that serious that I care about losing one match because of batteries.

Monitor response time, I always thought of as fishy since the the refresh rate is likely to be 60hz/60fps which is one frame every 16.67ms. So until is gets near that number, it is likely to not really matter. It only has to respond as fast as the refresh rate.
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October 9, 2012 3:48:52 AM

twelve25 said:
I like wireless and they do just fine for gaming. Maybe there is 5 extra microseconds of lag, but it's nothing compared to your network lag. As for batteries, I get plenty of warning and only once has it happened mid game. I guess I am not that serious that I care about losing one match because of batteries.

Monitor response time, I always thought of as fishy since the the refresh rate is likely to be 60hz/60fps which is one frame every 16.67ms. So until is gets near that number, it is likely to not really matter. It only has to respond as fast as the refresh rate.


re response vs refresh. You're making the same mistake Darksable makes. Response time is how fast a pixel changes state from one to the other and back again. Refresh rate is how fast the entire screen refreshes. Although the two work together, they are not the same and have different functions. Having too slow a response time means that not all the pixels have changed before the next refresh cycle.
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