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$4000 Budget

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November 29, 2012 11:26:10 PM

Hey Sup,

I'm looking to build a 4-6 monitor setup for day trading and some gaming.

These are the two main components I need, and I have no idea which mobo, ram, psu, cooling, etc to pick.

Intel Core i7-3930K Sandy Bridge-E 3.2GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 2011 130W Six-Core Desktop Processor BX80619i73930K

EVGA 04G-P4-2690-KR GeForce GTX 690 4GB 512-bit GDDR5 PCI Express 3.0 x16 HDCP Ready SLI Support Video Card

Also, I would like to avoid any unneccessarily expensive items that are not worth their price, or will ever be worth their price.

So far these are what I would need:

1.) Some redundancy. I just need to have my ssd boot drive cloned. I'll be installing windows, and the main applications I need to use on my boot. Everything else, will be put onto a 5.25" storage.
2.) Basic optical drive with R/W
3.) 4X Monitor recommendations. Not included in budget, some recommendations would be appreciated.
4.) Lots of RAM
5.) Average sized case
6.) Liquid cooling when needed, if needed. I'm okay having those giant heatsinkfans as long as they fit in the average sized case.
7.) Sufficient PSU

I'll update to the list as I finalize on the order.

I was on a business trip over black friday/cyber monday so please let me know if I missed out on any deals!

Thanks in advance,

Street

More about : 4000 budget

November 29, 2012 11:42:04 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($399.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Extreme EATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($409.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($129.98 @ Outlet PC)
Storage: Samsung 840 Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($369.00 @ B&H)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card ($999.99 @ Amazon)
Case: NZXT Switch 810 (White) ATX Full Tower Case ($169.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair Professional Gold 850W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($179.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($87.28 @ CompUSA)
Total: $2916.19
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-29 20:40 EST-0500)

This is what I was able to throw together. I left plenty of room for monitors since I am not too acquainted with them. As for CPU cooling, for this price a custom loop is what I would recommend. Otherwise if a custom loop is not wanted, a Corsair H100i will do well. The only thing is a few of the items will be a bit more since some are walk in stores listed as lowest price. Expect the final of this build to be somewhere between $3200 and $3300. (The i7 alone is $150 more in most places)
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November 29, 2012 11:48:46 PM

Sweet deal on the 3930K! There's a microcenter right next to my house :D 
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November 29, 2012 11:56:22 PM

mcstreet said:
Sweet deal on the 3930K! There's a microcenter right next to my house :D 


Lucky! Most of us would have to drive so far that we spend the savings in the deals they offer on gas money :( 
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November 30, 2012 1:47:01 AM

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($399.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master TPC 812 86.2 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($57.12 @ NCIX US)
Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Formula ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($362.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: Corsair XMS 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($144.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($209.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($209.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1020.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: Asus GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1020.99 @ Amazon)
Case: Cooler Master HAF X ATX Full Tower Case ($168.99 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: Cooler Master Silent Pro Gold 1200W 80 PLUS Gold Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($217.59 @ CompUSA)
Total: $3888.62
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)

Yeah this is a sweet build you could have...
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November 30, 2012 1:47:46 AM

Oh also just remove a 690 from above and you have less horse power but it saves you 1k... :o 
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November 30, 2012 1:54:23 AM

you did say you needed lots of RAM, but really what are you going to be using 32 GBs worth of it for. again, i dont know what it will be used for but to me that is a bit overkill
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November 30, 2012 2:03:34 AM

Multitaksing :p  Ram is cheap as hell right now anyways.
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November 30, 2012 3:30:35 AM

go for the new asus vg278HE, only monitor on the market that runs 144hs refresh rate. it's TN monitor, but who cares about IPS. Runs Nvidia 3d Vision, got this off NCIX for 350. Now it goes for half a grand. 4 of these running on gtx 690 and you'll get knocked off your chair.
PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/qeBJ
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/qeBJ/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/qeBJ/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i7-3930K 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($399.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 CPU Cooler ($81.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock X79 Extreme6/GB ATX LGA2011 Motherboard ($259.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Z Series 32GB (8 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Green 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($89.99 @ B&H)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1199.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card (2-Way SLI) ($1199.99 @ NCIX US)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 932 Blue ATX Full Tower Case ($189.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Kingwin Mach 1 1000W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX / BTX Power Supply ($144.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $3766.89
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-30 00:30 EST-0500)
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November 30, 2012 5:05:58 AM

As far as which monitor is for you all depends on a lot of factors Response Rate


The response rate of an LCD monitor refers to how quickly each pixel on the screen can change color. The lower the response rate, the faster the screen updates. If you are playing fast-paced action game for example, where the images change quickly, if you're playing on a monitor with a slower response rate, you may experience what is known as "ghosting". Ghosting happens when the previous image displayed on the screen can still be seen as a blur for moments after the image has changed.


When choosing the best gaming monitor, the response rate is perhaps the single most important factor to consider. Ghosting and motion blur can ruin your overall gaming experience. The faster the response rate of your monitor, the less ghosting you will see.


I would say that an LCD with a response rate of 5ms is the minimum for gaming. Lower than 5ms is better of course (remember that the lower, the faster), and the very best gaming monitors on the market have extremely fast response rates such as 2ms and lower to avoid any ghosting/blur issues completely.



LED vs LCD Monitors


LED monitors are the exact same as LCD monitors, except they use LED backlighting which provides some advantages such as a brighter and sharper display, thinner screen, and lower power usage.


LED monitors currently cost a little more than a standard LCD, but if you want the best gaming monitor then I would definitely suggest you buy one. If not, a standard LCD monitor with a good response rate will do just fine.



What Size Monitor?


Ultimately, the size you go for is totally up to you and how much you're willing to spend. Obviously the larger the screen, the more expensive it will be, but for the best gaming monitor experience I would suggest at least 19", and go for a widescreen LCD if you can. Nothing beats gaming on a nice, decent-sized widescreen monitor.


If you want the most immersive gaming experience possible and you have the money to spend, go for a quality 23" or 24" screen, or even 25" and above. After gaming on such a massive screen you won't ever want to go back to a smaller screen!



Contrast Ratio


The contrast ratio of a monitor can be a helpful spec to generally compare picture quality between different monitors. In general, the higher the contrast ratio, the better the picture quality.


With high contrast ratios your screen can produce deeper black levels, which creates a more immersive and visually sharp experience. Keep in mind that the contrast ratio isn't always an accurate measure of image quality, so don't use it solely to compare two monitors as there's more to it than that.



Viewing Angle


If you look at an LCD monitor from an angle, you will notice that the image appears dimmer and the colors can look weird. At extreme angles the entire image can even disappear. The viewing angle of an LCD monitor is the angle at which you can still view the screen clearly, and is usually listed in the monitor's specifications list.


The greater the viewing angle, the better, but for gamers the viewing angle doesn't really matter because you are looking directly at the screen the whole time. But there are some people who will consider the viewing angle important, for example if you need to show presentations with your LCD monitor.



Matte vs Glossy Screens There are two kinds of modern LCD screens: matte (anti-glare) and glossy. Both have their pros and cons and are a subject of many discussions.


Matte screens don't get glare or reflections on them; however, the same rough surface (polarizer) that reduces the intensity of reflected light results in less contrast and brightness since the light from the LCD screen has to pass through it. Matte screens diffuse light instead of reflecting it so they might be easier to read outdoors, if the backlight provides enough brightness. You don't have to worry about reflections unlike with a glossy screen. One of the downsides of a strong anti-glare coating in matte displays is a grainy "crystalline" pattern which is mostly visible when viewing text on a white background.


Glossy screens have vibrant colors and high contrast and brightness because they have a smooth, high-gloss surface. As a result, it is often the choice for movies or gaming. However, strong lighting sources in the environment cause glare on these screens which is not only annoying, but can also cause eye strain and pain. If the lighting isn't adequate, you will also see distracting reflections on the screen. Some graphics designers may find the colors inaccurate, although that mostly depends on the LCD matrix. Glossy will work great for you if the lighting in your room doesn't create any glare on the screen. 120Hz
Why a 120Hz Refresh Rate Computer Monitor?
120Hz Vs. 60Hz
120 Hz vs. 60Hz Refresh Rate - Source: BenQBoth response time, the time it takes for a pixel to go from black to white and back again, and input lag, the difference in time that it takes for you to input a command into your computer and see it displayed, are very well-known terms in the gaming community. Few gamers think about the impact that a higher refresh rate will have on their game.


What is Refresh Rate?


Refresh rate is basically the amount of times in a second that a monitor will draw the data which it receives. Most TN and IPS panel monitors have a 60Hz refresh rate. In order to really see all the advantages that come with a 120Hz display you should be gaming at an FPS well above 60.


Benefits of 120Hz:


1. Details are more crisp, smoothly rendered, and lifelike.
2. More Responsive If you're looking for the best 3D monitor that will also play great in 2D, then you should choose between the BenQ XL2420T and the ASUS VG278H. Both incorporate nVidia's 3D Vision 2 with 3D LightBoost which greatly improves the overall 3D experience.


While the BenQ doesn't disappoint as far as specifications with a 2ms response time, 120Hz refresh rate, low input lag, and a great picture, The XL2420T comes with a lot of other features built-in to this monitor specifically for gamers including FPS Mode, RTS Mode, Intuitive OSD, S. Switch;Height Adjustment, and Game Mode Loader.


If you just want this monitor for the 2D technology, then you might want to consider its predecessor, XL2410T, which is significantly cheaper and has many of the same features as the XL2420T, but has nVidia 3D Vision rather than 3D Vision 2. Great Gaming Monitors
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November 30, 2012 8:57:32 AM

Wait a second, is the $4k limit excluding monitors? Because if so my build will be best since it leaves about a grand for all the monitors that you will need. As for cooling just add on a Corsair H100i.
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November 30, 2012 9:23:12 AM

http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/552?vs=551 <------ Intel Core i7 3930K - 3.2GHz vs Intel Core i7 3770K - 3.5GHz Take a look at that page and look at the gaming benches (middle of that page on down) then take a look at the power consumption under load bench towards the bottom of that page. Now ask yourself what a $570 cpu gets you vs a $330 cpu or better yet a $230 cpu seeing how the 3570K runs pretty much dead even with the 3770K.It's comparable to taking your money and setting it on fire hence the reason you would be hard pressed to find one legit site on the net that recommends it.I suggest this if your not set on the i7 3930K

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($81.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus V Extreme EATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($378.48 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card ($1008.49 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF X ATX Full Tower Case ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic Platinum 1000W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($225.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $2794.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-30 06:28 EST-0500)
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November 30, 2012 9:41:59 AM

bigcyco1 said:
http://www.anandtech.com/bench/Product/552?vs=551 <------ Intel Core i7 3930K - 3.2GHz vs Intel Core i7 3770K - 3.5GHz Take a look at that page and look at the gaming benches (middle of that page on down) then take a look at the power consumption under load bench towards the bottom of that page. Now ask yourself what a $570 cpu gets you vs a $330 cpu or better yet a $230 cpu seeing how the 3570K runs pretty much dead even with the 3770K.It's comparable to taking your money and setting it on fire hence the reason you would be hard pressed to find one legit site on the net that recommends it.I suggest this if your not set on the i7 3930K

CPU: Intel Core i7-3770K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($329.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Noctua NH-D14 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($81.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus Maximus V Extreme EATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($378.48 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair Vengeance LP 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($149.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($159.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: OCZ Vertex 4 256GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($239.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 690 4GB Video Card ($1008.49 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF X ATX Full Tower Case ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic Platinum 1000W 80 PLUS Platinum Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($225.98 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($19.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $2794.88
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-11-30 06:28 EST-0500)


If you read what the OP was going to use this PC for, you would find that it's primary use is day trading. I am not sure of the demands on a PC this causes but it would be a safe bet to go with the 3930X.
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November 30, 2012 9:44:27 AM

Alright mcstreet, just add 3-4 BenQ XL2420T monitors onto my build and you are set :) 
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November 30, 2012 9:46:39 AM

Poltregeist said:
If you read what the OP was going to use this PC for, you would find that it's primary use is day trading. I am not sure of the demands on a PC this causes but it would be a safe bet to go with the 3930X.
I see well i am not sure either we'll let him decide ;) 
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November 30, 2012 9:50:28 AM

I'd like to point out Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit only supports up to 16gb of RAM.
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November 30, 2012 10:57:00 AM

excella1221 said:
I'd like to point out Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit only supports up to 16gb of RAM.

+1 for knowing facts
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November 30, 2012 11:02:31 AM

excella1221 said:
I'd like to point out Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit only supports up to 16gb of RAM.

+1
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November 30, 2012 2:45:19 PM

So what version DOES support lets say 32GB?
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November 30, 2012 4:46:30 PM

Poltregeist said:
So what version DOES support lets say 32GB?

Up to Premium it's 16gigs, Professional and after 192gb. That's a huge jump.
Windows Memory Limit
Version Limit on X86 Limit on X64
Windows 7 Ultimate
4 GB
192 GB
Windows 7 Enterprise
4 GB
192 GB
Windows 7 Professional
4 GB
192 GB
Windows 7 Home Premium
4 GB
16 GB
Windows 7 Home Basic
4 GB
8 GB
Windows 7 Starter
2 GB
N/A
For the monitors, I was sold on the Benq, but I went with the Asus VG278He.This is the smoothest gaming experience you can get on a sub 600 monitor. There is no IPS panel that goes at 144hz, let alone 120hz, except the cat leap. Unfortunately, the monitor market sucks, the very nice 1440p monitors are all priced at over 700. Even with your budget, 4 of these super high res monitors will cost almost as much as your 4000$ budget. I'd recommend either the asus or the benq, like Poltregeist suggested.
ASUS VG278HE Hardwarecanucks review
Great Monitor review website <- you can look up the Benq here
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!