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Windows 98se bootup

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Anonymous
January 25, 2002 8:55:33 PM

can anyone tell me how I can speed up the booting up sequence for win98se. I believe removing the win98 startup screen is something I can do, how do i do this??

More about : windows 98se bootup

January 25, 2002 9:13:52 PM

download Tweakui for unloading the boot screen and other enhancements (do a google.com search) go to start|run|type in msconfig, enter, uncheck unneeded programs tsr's etc .. I usually only open with explorer, tweakui, systray running ..got my 98 se pee-3 system to boot in 45 seconds with these tweaks

lagger

<b><font color=blue>Computers run on smoke, I let the smoke out of mine and it quit working </b> </font color=blue>
January 25, 2002 9:22:45 PM

That's what I use too msconfig. There's more tweeks on Cnet. I use to boot up in like 30sec., once I put my DSL modem in it now takes closer to a minute+
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January 25, 2002 9:48:20 PM

Easy way to fix the DSL boot-up issue. Simply go to your network configuration and instead of having your NIC obtain an address automatically, set it to specify and address... use 192.168.0.1 (or replace the 1 with any number between 1 and 255).. and for subnet mask put in 255.255.255.0. This should speed up your boot as the network card is polling the DSL for an IP address before Windows loads... if you specify one, it will load much quicker. I've been running that config for quite some time and have had no issues.
January 26, 2002 12:02:21 AM

That sounds great, but I look all over and did not see where I could change what you said. There was an AOL icon with what you said, but did not allow me to make those changes. Could you walk me threw it a little better. I'm using win98
January 26, 2002 4:16:54 AM

At <A HREF="http://user.cs.tu-berlin.de/~normanb/README98.HTM" target="_new">this page</A>, scroll until the text <font color=red>Important!</font color=red> shows. Follow the steps provided. Even better - if you aren't using RASPPPoE, it's so much better than Enternet 300 or something like that.

Hope this helps...

<A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/btvillarin" target="_new">My Website</A>-<b>reorganized</b> & updated everyday
January 26, 2002 6:44:03 AM

start from BIOS.

<b>1</b>. disable the ports (serial/parallel/USB/IDE) you dont use. this will save some time in initialising them and you will have some extra IRQs for other devices as well.

<b>2</b>. disable floppy drive seek and floppy drive swap

<b>3</b>. do not set Hard disks to Auto detect, set the parameters (you can auto-detect them and save the parameters) to proper values and set None where there isnt any IDE device connected.

<b>4</b>. you can use TewakUI to disable the boot logo and disable wait period before startup (that 2 secs wait)

<b>5</b>. keep minimum applications running at startup, look for them in
<b>a</b>. Start->Programs->StartUp
<b>b</b>. Regedit
<i>Loaded for all users</i>
HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
<i>User specific</i>
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunServices
Delete all those you dont need, do not run internet utilities at startup, you dont need them all the time anyway

<b>c</b>. Sysedit->checkout the keys in
<i>win.ini</i>
[windows]
load=
run=

<i>in system.ini</i>
shell=Explorer.exe

and both autoexec.bat and config.sys

<b>6</b>. you can also defragment the drive periodically to keep applications loading faster.

you can set the swapfile size to a fixed value and prevent it from fragmenting. its a good idea to move the swap file to D drive My Computer->Properties->Performance->Virtual Memory, defragment the C drive and then relocate the swapfile back to C with a fixed size, say about 2~4X of system memory. e.g. for a RAM of 128 MB, 192 or 224MB of swap file is good enough although it has to be studied by trial and error for your usage pattern.

girish

<font color=red>Nothing is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
January 26, 2002 6:49:06 AM

and one more, if you have a network card in your system, disable DHCP, it takes a long time to timeout if you dont have any DHCP server in your network or your PC is standalone!

<font color=red>Nothing is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
January 26, 2002 7:01:35 AM

Right-click on Network Neighborhood, select Properties from the menu. In that list you'll find TCP/IP for your network card (whatever it happens to be.. ie TCP/IP --> D-Link 530TX). If you hilight that TCP/IP and check its properties, you'll see what I'm talking about... hope that helps!
Anonymous
January 26, 2002 10:00:11 AM

I got the boot up down to 40 secs. Thanks
Any other optimisation tips you could give me.
I have an Athlon 550 (slot A)
17.3 GB Hard drive partitioned 50/50
ATI rage128 graphic card
soundblaster live 1024 sound card
56k modem.
Win 98se
any tips and I would be grateful.
January 26, 2002 12:59:55 PM

Thats dangerous, the address you set should not interfere with the addresses the DHCP server of your DSL server issues else you wont be able to connect to the net. You can of course, ask the admin about the IP address range, and set the one that doesnt interfere with the range of IPs that the server leases.

Or you can keep a record of the IP addresses you get everytime you connect (you can get the address by the command <b>winipcfg</b> on the run box or <b>ipconfig</b> on the command prompt, and set the node address a bit higher than the usual range.

Remember, if you specify a static address, and it interferes with one that is already given to somebody else, you will get an error message for suplicate IP address and you will need to reboot the system to set a new IP!

You might refer to TCP/IP documentation and assigned ranges to decide on the IP.

girish

<font color=red>Nothing is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
January 26, 2002 1:07:07 PM

40 secs for a Athlon 550 is quite reasonable, considering the rest of the parts.

You can reduce the number of icons on your desktop to minimum, the respective file is read to get the appropriate icon, that increases the time to paint the desktop.

defrag the C drive, and make sure you have the latest IDE drivers. Most AMD 760 boards use the VIA 82686A/B southbridge, so you can get the latest version of 4in1 drivers from the VIA site. And update to the latest BIOS version.

girish

<font color=red>Nothing is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
January 26, 2002 2:17:54 PM

That's great! Thanks

I was so close too. I just have one more question for you. With these addresses out for everyone to see can't they get into our computer?



<b> btvillarin</b>

Thanks for the link, it looks interesting I'll have to check that out.
January 26, 2002 2:21:24 PM

Change your boot sequence to "C: only".

:cool: <b><font color=blue>The Cisco Kid</font color=blue></b> :cool:
January 26, 2002 4:18:37 PM

They'll try to get in regardless.. heh. The IP address you assign the NIC will be different than the IP address your ISP assigns you for your modem. Best thing to do on a broadband connection is to have a firewall running; I've had people try to get into my computer and they didn't know my IP address... they have ways of finding those sorts of things out.
January 26, 2002 4:40:32 PM

Dangerous huh? Would be the first time my ISP told me to do something that was dangerous... lol. This address range is what they told me to use, and I have had no issues connecting to anything. Nor have I ever received a message that someone had the same IP address as mine. (I've set up more than one computer with the same IP address for the NIC).

As for IP addresses, the ones my ISP assigns are static. I've disconnected and reconnected numerous times and have always received the same IP address. Only dial-up users have a dynamic IP.

The only thing you have to worry about is if you're computer is on a local network and you assign the same IP to your NIC as someone on the local network. The IP address you specify for your NIC is different than the IP address you ISP will assign you for your modem. Trust me, I've checked. Put it this way; try it and if it doesn't work, you can always change it back. I've set up every DSL user in town (I do installs for our ISP) with a static IP for their NIC and have had no complaints... in fact they're quite happy that their computer now boots much quicker.
January 26, 2002 5:10:14 PM

This is weird, I all ready responded but I do not see it. I had said as long as the IP addresses are different then I'm not worried and I do have firewall.
Thanks again.
By the way that shaved 15 seconds off.

<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by jiffy on 01/26/02 05:40 PM.</EM></FONT></P>
Anonymous
January 26, 2002 8:28:32 PM

My motherboard is a gigabyte GA-71XE, using the AMD 750 chipset, where can I download the latest IDE driver from?
I intend to upgrade my motherboard to a Socket A board and get a better athlon somthing in the region of 1.4Ghz using DDR sdram With ata100, also want to get a better graphics card. This will have to wait though as I cant afford it. We British are ripped off everything is more expensive here!
January 27, 2002 11:03:03 AM

So it would work only if your ISP gives static IPs, thats a lame thing to <i>assume</i> in general, isnt it? As a comedian put it, do not ASSUME things, they make a ASS of U and ME!

Anyway, so if the IPs <i>are</i> static then theres no problem setting them permenantly. The cable ISP I connect to gives dynamic IPs so I cannot use a static one.

<font color=red>Nothing is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
January 27, 2002 11:18:21 AM

you can get the latest drivers on AMD site, <A HREF="http://www.amd.com/us-en/Processors/TechnicalResources/..." target="_new">here</A>. Dont know whether they are latest, even those are pretty old.

You can have the Asus A7A266-E for your new processor, I rate this mobo the best, but if you ar eoverclocking freak then the Iwill XP333 would be much better.

girish


<font color=red>Nothing is fool-proof. Fools are Ingenious!</font color=red>
January 27, 2002 5:07:44 PM

I never assume anything when it comes to IP addresses. Instead of being a doubting Thomas, try it... as I said if it doesn't work, you can always change it back. I'm pretty much 100% certain it will work. Again, you're assigning an IP to your NIC.. not your MODEM. Connections using PPPoE are a little different that connections using the always-on method. When you assign an IP address to your NIC, that is being used for your local network, not the internet. When I ping my computer's name it tries to ping my local address, but the request times out.... now if I ping the address for my modem, then I will get a response. Again, if it doesn't work you can change it back.. it's not like your screwing anything up permanently.. and as Jiffy said, he shaved 15 seconds off his boot-up time. I've seen some computers take over a minute for the NIC trying to obtain an IP address. As soon as the address was static, the computers booted up a lot faster.

<font color=red> If you design software that is fool-proof, only a fool will want to use it. </font color=red>
!