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First system advice.

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December 7, 2012 2:54:41 PM

Trying to build a budget gaming PC. I want to stay within a budget because I have never done gaming on a PC before so I thought I should try it. If I don't enjoy as much as I did when I had a console, then it would still be a pretty decent machine even when newer hardware and stuff comes out.
I tried to keep expandability and longevity in mind to build this system. Also, if things go i well, I would like to start doing video editing as a hobby. So I would also like to be able to upgrade my system into a better video editing machine if it becomes a substantial part of my day in the future.

so in short I need a long-lasting, budget PC that could easily upgrade to gaming rig, or a video editing system. Why didn't I just say that at first? lol

okay so here it goes
Case:HAF 912
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Mobo: MSI Z77A
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

PSU: Raidmax Hybrid 630W
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

CPU: Intel i5 3570K
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

RAM: GSkill Sniper 2x4 gig (8gig)
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

HDD: Seagate Barracude 500gig
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

DVD Drive: Asus black DVD Burner
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

So what do you guys and gals think? is there any way I can cut back on the price but still get good performance? and is this gonna be a good starting place for what I may want in the future.

More about : system advice

a c 271 4 Gaming
December 7, 2012 3:57:58 PM

Do *NOT* - repeat do *NOT* purchase a Raidmax power supply - they are among the industry's absolute worst vendors. Get this instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

A bit more expensive but a good power supply is something you don't want to cheap out or cut corners on.

Also don't bother with low voltage RAM on Ivy Bridge builds, you will need something like this instead: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I also didn't see a cooler or GPU listed - what do you plan to use there?
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a b 4 Gaming
December 7, 2012 4:42:52 PM

^+1 to everything g-unit1111 said.
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December 7, 2012 4:50:33 PM

wanderer11 said:
^+1 to everything g-unit1111 said.


+2? lol

Also consider what size monitor/resolution you're planning to work at. That will help reflect on what specs. you'll want to look at more specifically.
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December 7, 2012 7:48:41 PM

I was planning on buying a GPU or cooler until I figure out if I am actually going to be working this thing to death, or if I'm just going to be surfing the web with it.
If I want to invest in a GPU, which do you suggest? I've been seriously considering it but I have absolutely no idea where to start.
and I'm looking at a 21.5 inch full HDMI monitor
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December 7, 2012 10:01:02 PM

Small monitor with HDMI cable means 1920x1080, so you won't need a super powerful card. Could probably get away with something in the ~$100 range, like a 7770 or a GTX 550ti, and still have more than enough graphics power unless you're trying to run games like Crysis2 or BF3 at super high resolutions. For the cpu cooler, unless you're going to overclock you can just stick with the included heatsink, it will do the job just fine at stock clocks, and frankly you won't need that good of a processor with a single monitor and just that res, but it IS a good cpu (I have one in my current system) and I can't say anything bad about it.

Come up with a total budget you want to work within, pick parts you like or want to use, and then upgrade components or downgrade as you adjust to get to the price you want.

One last thing to consider is if you intend on using a higher resolution monitor, multi-monitor setup, or ultra high graphics in games. Those will all affect where you're going to want to look as far as a video card. Best places to start are either the cpu, gpu, or a combo of them that will give you approximately the desired results, and then build around them, adjusting options as you go. Hope that helps.
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December 7, 2012 10:33:06 PM

"easily upgrade to a gaming rig or video editing system"

A video editing system requires a very powerful CPU, so there is a need for an aftermarket cooler.

If you were to get an i5-3570k, I'm assuming you'd be overclocking (otherwise, don't get the "k"), another reason you'd need an aftermarket cooler.

You need to decide what kind of computer you want to start with, because there really isn't an "easy" upgrade to a video editing system.

Gaming rig is another story. From the build you have (with a better PSU, as suggested above, and an aftermarket cooler) all you'd need to do is drop $150-300 on a GPU.
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