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Luxury System Build $2-3k for Gaming/Scientific Computing/Simulations

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December 7, 2012 5:15:52 PM

Any suggestions???

$180 COOLER MASTER HAF X Black Steel/ Plastic ATX Full Tower Computer Case
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$429.99 ASUS Rampage IV Extreme LGA 2011 Intel X79 SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 Extended ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$569.99 Intel Core i7-3930K Sandy Bridge-E 3.2GHz (3.8GHz Turbo) LGA 2011 130W Six-Core Desktop Processor
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$349.99 CORSAIR Vengeance 64GB (8 x 8GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1866
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$185.99 ASUS Xonar Essence STX Virtual 7.1 Channels 24-bit 192KHz PCI Express x1 Interface 124 dB SNR / Headphone AMP Card
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

$89.99 Noctua NH-D14 SE2011 140mm and 120mm SSO CPU Cooler
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

I should preface this by saying I'm doing less gaming and more programming today than I was while I was in college so I'm planning on keeping my Geforce GTX 560 and waiting until the next generation of cards arrive from Nvidia (7-series?). I'm really in favor of having an LGA 2011 socket because the upcoming Ivy Bridge-E CPUs will support it (looking to upgrade to hex-core Ivy Bridge when it comes out). I'm pretty set on having a six-core CPU since I do scientific computing projects that are highly multi-threaded involving heavy-duty linear algebra and the like as a professional electrical and aerospace engineer.

The motherboard and RAM might be overkill (call me out if they are)!!!

The high-end sound card is definitely not overkill though since I am a headphone/music addict. The Cirrus Logic DAC on that sound card, along with an actual impedance-matched headphone amplifier, swappable opamp chip socket, and EMI shielding make it THAT much better for me than integrated or any brand-name *** from Creative.

PROBLEM: I can't seem to find the perfect case. The HAF X is pretty good -- everyone speaks highly of it -- except the front panel is made out of plastic and it is not so silent. I do like its large cooling fans though (> 200 mm). I'm really looking for a quiet aluminum full-tower case with USB 3.0 front panel. A built-in SSD mount would be nice as well. If you have any suggestions for something that would better fit these criteria, please let me know.

You might notice a missing optical drive, hard drive, and SSD. I already have these items from my old build, and so I am recycling them. I don't care for Bluray (shiver me timbers! ). I also have a 750W Corsair power supply (made by Seasonic) that I plan on using. Let me know if this is not adequate power for what I'm doing.

NOTE: I plan on OC'ing the CPU to 4.5 GHz on air cooling -- notice the Noctua fan. Is there a better air cooler out there? I don't plan on going to water.
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December 7, 2012 6:03:35 PM

As a fellow professional, I also run massive simulations. I find 16GB usually is good, even for simulations that can last days, but we are running different things, I'm an IC designer. The really massive simulations others do can use 32G, but these are of hundreds of thousands of transistors. We have 64GB computers in our "server farm" but normally they are running several simulations at once. About the ram, how much do your simulations need? How many will you be running at once?
December 7, 2012 6:16:06 PM

babernet_1 said:
As a fellow professional, I also run massive simulations. I find 16GB usually is good, even for simulations that can last days, but we are running different things, I'm an IC designer. The really massive simulations others do can use 32G, but these are of hundreds of thousands of transistors. We have 64GB computers in our "server farm" but normally they are running several simulations at once. About the ram, how much do your simulations need? How many will you be running at once?


Mine only take 16 GB as well, but emphasis on the word "luxury."
December 7, 2012 6:20:49 PM

TheChuckster said:
Mine only take 16 GB as well, but emphasis on the word "luxury."



You want luxury? I'll give you luxury, a big 24-30 inch screen running a modern game. Get yourself a GTX 680 or AMD 7970 and play some modern games, they are amazing. I go way back to, believe it or not, Pong. Games nowdays do what was a pipe-dream of mine back in the seventies.
December 7, 2012 6:50:23 PM

babernet_1 said:
You want luxury? I'll give you luxury, a big 24-30 inch screen running a modern game. Get yourself a GTX 680 or AMD 7970 and play some modern games, they are amazing. I go way back to, believe it or not, Pong. Games nowdays do what was a pipe-dream of mine back in the seventies.


Pardon my defensiveness, but I'm sticking with my 22" monitor and my GTX 560 though. I would rather wait until > 1080P desktop consumer monitors come out, along with the NVIDIA GTX 7-series before upgrading. My existing computer is six years old. Things that will be running on my system: multiple concurrent VMs, testing a cloud GPU computing service, simulated load testing a commercial web service used by social gaming apps with millions of users. These things require a TON of RAM. Believe me, between my full-time job and my side ventures, I will be taking full advantage of this machine's power. Now that I have the funding to spend on this, why shouldn't I get the best machine possible? I'm spending about as much as someone would on a new Retina Macbook Pro for this machine and getting so much extra computing power out of it, rather than buying a fashion accessory in gadget form.
December 7, 2012 6:57:07 PM

At work I have dual monitors, but just use them for work, not gaming. At home I have a 24 inch 1920X1200 display for gaming and some work too and it is great. You can get a 27 inch 2540X1440 display for about $400 dollars nowadays. For about $600-700 you can get a 2540X1600 display.
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