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First Build ($1000-$1500 budget)

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December 8, 2012 3:38:25 AM

Hello, I decided to switch to pc gaming from consoles. I want to take on the task of building my own, and I have done the basic research and all I have left to do is select all of the components.

I'll be using It with a 40 inch 1080p tv. I don't need to have Highest settings so long as i am not on low settings. I would like the possible parts for my money and would like them to last as long as possible. I would like to stay around the $1000 range but I'm willing to go up to $1500. Any and all help is greatly appreciated!


Thanks,
Jacob

More about : build 1000 1500 budget

December 8, 2012 4:43:37 AM



CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Crucial M4 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7970 GHz Edition 3GB Video Card ($454.98 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 650W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1345.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-08 01:43 EST-0500)
December 8, 2012 4:54:12 AM

Here a cheaper build if you prefer to keep it around 1,000

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Samsung 830 Series 128GB 2.5" Solid State Disk ($112.98 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($247.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Enforcer ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($99.99 @ Newegg)
Total: $1054.31
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-08 01:53 EST-0500)
Related resources
December 8, 2012 5:02:53 AM

Thanks for the reply, I already have a copy of windows 7. What what you upgrade with the extra $100?

Also is the ssd neccisary?
December 8, 2012 5:15:19 AM

No ssd is just what most us gamers install our os on it's not a must here i redid it if you want cheaper here

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($247.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Enforcer ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $841.34
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-08 02:23 EST-0500)
December 8, 2012 5:23:05 AM



CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1090.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-08 02:21 EST-0500)
December 8, 2012 5:36:00 AM

This build allows you to add another one of those cards later on in SLI if you ever feel the need.



http://www.amazon.com/Corsair-Carbide-Mid-Tower-Compute... $71.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
Corsair Carbide Series Black 300R Mid-Tower Computer Case (CC-9011014-WW)

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008RJZQSW/ $84.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
Corsair CX750 Builder Series ATX 80 PLUS Bronze Certified Power Supply

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $109.99
ASRock Z77 Extreme3 LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard

http://www.amazon.com/Intel-Core-i5-3570K-Quad-Core-Pro... $214.97 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
Intel Core i5-3570K Quad-Core Processor 3.4 GHz 4 Core LGA 1155 - BX80637I53570K

http://www.amazon.com/Cooler-Master-Hyper-212-RR-212E-2... $31.95 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO - CPU Cooler with 120mm PWM Fan (RR-212E-20PK-R2)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $35.99
Crucial Ballistix Sport 8GB (2 x 4GB) 240-Pin DDR3 SDRAM DDR3 1600 (PC3 12800) Desktop Memory Model BLS2KIT4G3D1609DS1S00

http://www.amazon.com/Lite--Super-AllWrite-Layer-Drive/... $16.99 & eligible for FREE Super Saver Shipping on orders over $25
Lite-On Super AllWrite 24X SATA DVD+/-RW Dual Layer Drive - Bulk - IHAS124-04 Version C (Black)

http://www.amazon.com/GIGABYTE-WINDFORCE-PCI-Express-Gr... $379.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping | Price after rebate: $359.99
GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 670 WINDFORCE 2X OC Edition 2048MB GDDR5 PCI-Express 3.0 2x DVI/HDMI/DP SLI Ready Graphics Card GV-N670WF2-2GD

http://www.amazon.com/SanDisk-Extreme-2-5-Inch-Solid-SD... $168.53 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
SanDisk Extreme SSD 240 GB SATA 6.0 Gb-s 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive SDSSDX-240G-G25

http://www.amazon.com/Windows-Premium-64bit-System-Buil... $91.99 & this item ships for FREE with Super Saver Shipping
Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 64bit (Full) System Builder DVD 1 Pack


$1,207.38 *not including rebates



http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168... $99.99
SanDisk SDSSDP-128G-G25 2.5" 128GB SATA III Internal Solid State Drive (SSD)
December 8, 2012 5:57:41 AM

bigcyco1 said:
CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($214.99 @ Newegg)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: Asus P8Z77-V LK ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($124.99 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: Gigabyte GeForce GTX 670 2GB Video Card ($379.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 300R ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: SeaSonic 620W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($89.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $1090.90
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-08 02:21 EST-0500)



How much would the gigabyte outperform the MSI?

Also are the MSI and gigabyte off brands? I know the GeForce series in Nvidia.
Thanks
December 8, 2012 6:25:39 AM

bigcyco1 said:
Here my MSI 670 PE in action i have two but only using one in video for example you can see my fps top left side of screen http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BnLUJxCBZUg&feature=plcp



Hmmmm the 670 does seam quite a bit better. How long would a card like that last before needing to be upgraded?
December 8, 2012 6:29:45 AM

I am guessing two or three years nobody can say for sure how demanding future games will be.
December 8, 2012 6:34:15 AM

Next question, what is the difference between a quad core and dual core processor.
December 8, 2012 7:37:05 AM

Architectures

Although dual core processors and quad core processors have a different number of processing cores, that is where the differences end. Both Intel and AMD dual and quad core processors are based off architectures that can be used either as dual core or quad core processors.

Productivity Applications

There is little difference in the way quad core and dual core processors perform in simple applications like Microsoft Word or Internet Explorer.

Games

While quad cores are theoretically better for games, not all game developers program to take advantage of the two extra cores. Older games tend to run best on dual core processors, while most newer games take full advantage of quad core processors.

Rendering/Video Editing

Quad core processors have a serious performance advantage when it comes to performance in 3D rendering and video editing. The performance advantage of a quad core is typically between twenty and fifty percent.

Energy Consumption

Quad core processors typically consume more power than dual cores. There are some exceptions, however, such as the Intel Core i5 and Core i7 quad cores, which are more energy efficient than Core 2 Duo or AMD Athlon X2 dual core processors.


For many consumers shopping around for a new desktop or laptop PC, one of the biggest considerations is the type of processor, and the two most often in contention are the Intel Core i5 and Core i7. Discounting Core i3 (mainly found in budget systems) and AMD processors the difference between Intel Core i5 and Core i7 can seem daunting, especially when the prices seem so close together once they're in completed systems. I will break down the differences for you.

Price and Marketing
Simply put, Core i5-equipped systems will be less expensive than Core i7-equipped systems. Intel has moved away from the star ratings it used with previous-generation Core processors in favor of a capability-driven marketing message. Essentially, the Core i7 processors have more capabilities than Core i3 and Core i5 CPUs. Core i7 will be better for multi-tasking, multimedia tasks, high end gaming, and scientific work. Core i7 processors are certainly aimed at people who complain that their current system is "too slow." Spot-checking a system like the midrange Dell XPS 8500 desktop, you'll find the Core i5 about $150 less expensive than a similarly equipped Core i7 system.

Core Confusion
For the most part, you'll get faster CPU performance from Core i7 parts than Core i5. The majority of desktop Core i7 CPUs are quad-core processors, while many mobile Core i5 processors are dual-core. This is not always the case, as there are mobile dual-core Core i7 processors, and likewise several desktop quad-core Core i5 processors. Then of course you'll see the rare six-core Core i7, which are usually found with the desktop-only Extreme Edition top-of-the-line models.

The Core nomenclature has been used for several generations of CPUs. Nehalem and Westmere use three-digit model names (i.e. Core i7-920), while Sandy Bridge and Ivy Bridge CPUs use four-digit model names (Core i7-2600). Thankfully, unless you're shopping the used PC market, you'll find Sandy Bridge processors in closeout systems and budget PCs while you'll find Ivy Bridge processors in most new PCs. The essential takeaway is that to get better performance in each generation, buy a processor with a higher model number (e.g., a Core i7-3770 generally has better performance than a Core i5-3450).

In addition to generally faster base clock speeds, Core i7 processors have larger cache (on-board memory) to help the processor deal with repetitive tasks faster. If you're editing and calculating spreadsheets, your CPU shouldn't have to reload the framework the numbers sit in. This info will sit in the cache so that when you change a number the calculations are almost instantaneous. Larger cache sizes help with multitasking as well, since background tasks will be ready for when you switch focus to another window. On currently available desktop processors, i5 CPUs have 3MB to 6MB of L3 cache, while i7 processors have 8MB to 15MB.

A Word on Turbo Boost
Turbo Boost refers to Intel's "overclocking" feature built into its processors. Essentially, it allows the processor to run faster than its base clock speed when only one or two processor cores are needed (like when you're running a single-threaded task that you want done now). Both Core i5 and Core i7 processors use Turbo Boost, with Core i7 processors achieving higher clock speeds, of course.

Hyper-Threading
Intel Hyper-Threading uses multi-threading technology to make a processor appear to have more cores than it physically has to the operating system and applications. Hyper-Threading technology is used to increase performance at multi-threaded tasks. The simplest multi-threaded situation is a multi-tasking user running several programs simultaneously, but there are other tasks that take advantage of Hyper-Threading like multimedia operations (like transcoding, rendering, etc.) and Web surfing (loading different elements like Flash content and images simultaneously).

The quick explanation is that all Core i7 CPUs use Hyper-Threading, so a six-core CPU can handle 12 streams, a four core handles eight streams, and a dual-core handles four streams. Core i5 uses Hyper-Threading to make a dual-core CPU act like a four-core one, but if you have a Core i5 processor with four true cores, it won't have Hyper-Threading. For the time being, Core i5 tops out at handling 4 streams, using four real cores or two cores with Hyper-Threading.

Integrated Graphics
The Westmere generation of Core processors introduced Intel HD graphics, integrated graphics built into the processor core itself. Previous Intel integrated graphics were built onto the motherboard chipsets, rather than on the processor. You'll find DX10 Intel HD Graphics 2000/3000 in currently shipping Sandy Bridge processors, and new DX11-compatible Intel HD Graphics 2500/4000 in the newer Ivy Bridge processors. Same numerical rules apply, so Intel HD Graphics 4000 performs better than Intel HD Graphics 2000. You'll find 3000 and 4000 on Core i7, while Core i5 features one of all four versions of Intel HD graphics, depending on the part number. Integrated graphics saves power, since there won't be an extra graphics chip on your laptop or desktop's motherboard using power.

So, long story short: Core i5 is made for mainstream users who care about performance, and Core i7 is made for enthusiasts and high-end users.

here is an article that gives the best cpu's as of this month.
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-cpu-review-o...
December 8, 2012 2:32:01 PM

You mentioned that you rub two graphics cards? Is that something I can do later on if I upgrade?

Also speaking of upgrading, a couple years down the line when it's time to upgrade the graphics card. Are there certain cards that would not be compatable with my system? Or will any work?

Thanks for all of your help
December 8, 2012 3:02:57 PM

Yes you could if you have a motherboard that supports running two cards .Second question your system would most likely be compatible however i cannot see into the future lol
December 8, 2012 3:57:32 PM

Im going to go out today and pick a couple of components up today at the micro center because I found some great deals there. Just wondering, how do you know what parts are compatable? Just experience?
December 8, 2012 4:03:32 PM

Yeah pretty much.
December 8, 2012 4:10:09 PM

Ok, I found the CPU at micro center for $169! I'm excited to get this underway

Thank you for all of your help, you've been amazing! Ill come back if I have any issues.

Jacob
December 8, 2012 4:21:09 PM

No problem.Your welcome!Here this might help you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPIXAtNGGCw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_56kyib-Ls&list=PLB029F...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RxaVBsXEiok&list=PLB029F...
I often get questions such as:
- Who are you to tell me which parts to choose?
- Can you suggest me a step by step guide to build a computer?
- Why should I build a PC instead of buying one in a store?
- And many more… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v7wOl7XS4ps&list=PLB029F...
http://www.pcper.com/article.php?aid=824
http://bit.ly/4bhlwb
December 8, 2012 9:04:59 PM

Quick question, overclocking. I know the general idea but is it hard to do? And would overclocking make th 7870 on par with the 670?
December 8, 2012 9:20:41 PM

No a 7870 can not be overclocked to be on par with a 670.No it's not hard once you learn how to do it and understand it.I did a lot of research and learn all i can about it till i finally try it.
December 8, 2012 9:47:47 PM

Ok watching the videos you linked, mentioned the importance of air flow. Is that something I should be thinking about?
December 8, 2012 10:32:45 PM

No as long as you have a case with good air flow and a after market cpu cooler your good.You actually do not need a aftermarket cpu cooler if you do not intend to overclock your cpu the stock one works fine as long as your not overclocking.
December 8, 2012 10:43:40 PM

I just noticed in the newegg video that guy Paul skips important steps when building a computer that's not very responsible considering it's suppose to be a full tutorial this is more detailed http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1y8T8QAsDZs&list=SP28C18...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rND_LSux61M&list=SP28C18...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a2k0iKBvFhw&list=SP28C18...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVNtR42azyc&list=SP28C18...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EBr7RzxsuLg&list=SP28C18...
December 8, 2012 11:37:07 PM

I was looking at the asus motherboard reviews on newegg and people seamed to be having issues with it being doa. Should I be concerned?
December 9, 2012 12:11:00 AM

No i wouldn't be you half to understand half those posts are by people that have no clue what their doing and allot of the very issues they cry about were caused by them.Anyway if it make you feel better here are some other recommendations mobo:GIGABYTE GA-Z77X-UD5H LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

http://www.techspot.com/review/521-intel-z77-motherboar... <--- review w/benchmarks

http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/motherboards/2012/05/0... <--- review w/benchmarks


mobo:ASUS P8Z77-V PRO LGA 1155 Intel Z77 HDMI SATA 6Gb/s USB 3.0 ATX Intel Motherboard
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...


http://www.overclock3d.net/reviews/cpu_mainboard/asus_p... <--- review w/benchmarks http://www.techreaction.net/2012/06/28/review-asus-p8z7... <--- review w/benchmarks
December 9, 2012 1:43:25 AM

I'm going through and adding some of the parts to my newegg shopping cart when I realized there is no thermal paste, should I just pick a brand or do you have suggestions?
December 9, 2012 4:43:49 AM

After talking to some people on this forum and others, I've come to a tennitive build. I decided to with the lower end graphics card but changed the CPU for one that can be overclocked later along with the gpu. I wanted your opinion on the build

PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rBWG
Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rBWG/by_merchant/
Benchmarks: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rBWG/benchmarks/

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)

Motherboard: MSI Z77A-G41 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($94.98 @ Newegg)

Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)

Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)

Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($267.86 @ Newegg)

Case: Cooler Master Storm Enforcer ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.99 @ Newegg)

Power Supply: OCZ ModXStream Pro 500W 80 PLUS Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($73.98 @ Newegg)

Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)

Total: $862.76

(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-09 01:43 EST-0500)

Thanks!
December 9, 2012 4:56:41 AM

I am not a fan of the motherboard had bad luck with it that does not mean you will though i think it's a decent build.You need a aftermarket CPU cooler though
December 9, 2012 2:38:17 PM

The 7870 says it comes factory overclocked, can I overclock it more? And do I need to overclock the CPU if the gpu is?
December 9, 2012 3:02:48 PM

You do not have to overclock the CPU then again why buy a unlocked cpu if you don't intend to overclock.The MSI 7870 hawk can be overclocked further yes again you do not have to if you do not want to it's up to you.I would recommend you do not try it until you do enough research to understand it
December 9, 2012 4:41:25 PM

I would build it in a mATX form factor so that you don't have to have a huge case next to your entertainment center.
Case: Silverstone Temjin TJ08E
Motherboard: Gigabyte g1.Sniper M3
December 9, 2012 7:50:34 PM

I want to eventually overclock it but not now, not until I know what I'm doing. Btw you said you didn't have a good experience with that other mobo, have you had good results with the other one you posted?
December 9, 2012 8:54:44 PM

Ok thank you, how do you tell if a graphics card is compatable with a mobo? Why couldn't I throw a gt 670 in this build?
December 9, 2012 9:29:27 PM

I do not know why couldn't add a 670? As for the other question
Differences between Z77 Z75 and H77
intel ivy bridgeH77 = Not capable of Overclocking and Sli/Crossfire. Supports Ssd Caching.

Z75 = Overclockable and Sli/Crossfire Support but No Ssd Caching.

Z77= Flagship Ivy Bridge Chipset - Full Overclocking potential Tri Sli/CrossfireX support and all other features. this should help make sure to read it when you feel up to it http://www.overclock.net/t/1184241/socket-1155-chipset-...
December 11, 2012 6:44:08 PM

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.99 @ Newegg)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($40.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($109.99 @ Newegg)
Video Card: MSI Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($247.86 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master Storm Enforcer ATX Mid Tower Case ($69.99 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($59.99 @ Newegg)
Optical Drive: Asus DRW-24B1ST/BLK/B/AS DVD/CD Writer ($24.98 @ Newegg)
Total: $841.34
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-08 02:23 EST-0500)

I've been thinking really hard and I feel it's best to go with this setup for now and upgrade down the line if needed. Quick question I live up in the northern u.s. and was wondering if the cold temps will hurt the newegg parts durring shipping?
December 11, 2012 6:47:23 PM

I am not sure you should check with newegg customer service.
December 11, 2012 6:56:05 PM

Ok but you approve of this config? I'm honestly nervous about screwing up in assembly.
December 11, 2012 7:09:10 PM

It looks fine to me.I was nervous my first time as well you 'll be fine.If you are uncomfortable building your own PC and you want that high quality component choice like you have with your own builds a site like www.cyberpowerpc.com would be perfect for you. Obviously cyberpowerpc.com will be a little more expensive then doing it yourself.
December 11, 2012 7:26:00 PM

And order submitted.... I'm excited to be moving past console games.
December 11, 2012 7:28:49 PM

Lol!Cool enjoy!
December 16, 2012 10:56:32 PM

All of my parts are set to arrive tomorrow, I was wondering if there are anything to look for in terms of physical damage before I assemble it all. I'd hate to get it all together and realize the motherboard is shot.
!