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Want to build a dedicated game server at home.

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December 8, 2012 9:56:14 PM

I'm starting up a gaming community, and want to buy a server to host a few dedicated game servers (minecraft, CS:GO, possibly DayZ and some others.) at home. I want to do this, because all of the cost is upfront, and in the long run will quickly become the cheaper alternative to paying monthly to rent several large game servers. Plus, if things fall through, and I end up closing the server, I still have a set of good new parts to put into my aging gaming PC. (Just updated the graphics, but everything else is overdue.) Because of that backup plan, I've decided to use standard PC parts, and not server parts. That said, I wonder if they'll be able to handle running 23.99/7 year round? I don't know much about PC hardware, and certainly not anything about server hardware, so I'm definitely looking for advice on what I should be looking at in that department. As far as operating system for the server, I've picked out Debian Linux without X, (so it's basically nothing but command prompt for you windows users) and have it installed on an old PC for testing. So far, everything working fine, and I have minecraft and CS:GO servers successfully running on that PC.

I've already planned out a setup on pcpartpicker, but I don't actually know what I'm doing, so I'm definitely looking for advice on this build. I originally had a budget of $500, and would like to pull it down to that, if possible (or even lower), but I want to still be sure that I will be able to host all of these servers on the same machine without any problems.
Here's that build: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rx6v

Other Notes:
-Will my home internet be fast enough for this, and how much of a drain will it put on my own internet usage? Should I consider buying a second internet line, or just upgrading mine? Here's a speedtest of my current internet: http://www.speedtest.net/result/2360312144.png

-From what I've heard, minecraft is hugely RAM dependent, but everything else doesn't really need much of it. Is the 32GB overkill?

-Pcpartpicker listed that case as a mid size tower, so I just picked it without actually looking at the dimensions, and as it turns out, it's actually ginormous. Even bigger than my full size gaming PC. I'm hoping I can find a smaller case, but I'm worried that the lack of space could cause issues with overheating and the like.

-Speaking of overheating, what should I worry about when it comes to taking care of the hardware? Is it safe to just sit it on a table in my room, or does it need more special treatment?

-I'll also probably use it as a storage server for my home network, unless you think that's a terrible idea.

-Computer fans are the absolute bane of my existence. My laptop's single mini-fan was so loud that I literally opened it up and taped the fan down so it couldn't move, and bought a lap fan to replace it. It was louder than my lawn mower, and replacing it twice didn't change anything. Point is, I don't really know how to tell without actually hearing it, but I want to make sure this isn't going to be really loud. lol


And I think that's about it. Let me know what you think of the build, and please don't hesitate to yell at me, if I'm doing anything stupid. lol
December 9, 2012 3:19:15 AM

Bump. Really need help with this asap. Most important thing for me atm is determining whether my internet is fast enough for this, and if the hardware is good enough.
December 9, 2012 3:33:37 AM

The biggest question is how many people are going to be using the server concurrently. This will greatly determine if you internet connection is fast enough. As for RAM are you planning on having all of the above game servers running at the same time or one at a time. As for minecraft ( the one i have the most experience with ) you should be able to have about 10-20 playing will that upload and little to none other upload traffic.
Related resources
December 9, 2012 4:18:45 AM

Well the Dayz one you will have to pass on since they modified the requirements to be on the official server listing. You need at least a pipeline of 100mb up and down which needs to be on 99% of the month; a quad-core and 8gb of ram minimum and it recommends a SSD for the data otherwise if you don't meet these requirements they will not allow you to participate in hosting a server on the official server lists.

You would need about $2000-4000 for a nice server for those games running all at once and for internet you might be looking in the range of $700-800 a month.
December 9, 2012 4:22:11 AM

Yes, I'm planning to have them all run at once, as well as use the internet for my own streaming/gaming/video uploading, which is probably a recipe for disaster, I'm sure. Although, (aside from the youtube uploading) 99% of what anyone on my network would be doing is downloading, so in reality, the server and the rest of our usage is actually more or less separate, right? Or am I misunderstanding how it works?

mightymaxio said:
You would need about $2000-4000 for a nice server for those games running all at once and for internet you might be looking in the range of $700-800 a month.

I might as well buy a second house at that price. Is that including DayZ's minimum requirements, or all of the games other than DayZ?
December 9, 2012 4:28:49 AM

Some links to read:
http://www.techradar.com/news/gaming/how-to-set-up-a-de...

http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/build_it_ulti...

The second link isn't a gaming server, and the parts aren't optimal now but it was nicely explained.

RAM:
The first article recommends at least 4GB of RAM. Since it's cheap now, get at least 8GB. Is 16GB overkill for a small server? Possibly. Probably. I don't know for sure though.

Pay or Build?
The first article recommends paying. I wonder if you can get a few friends together to share the cost? Worth investigating, and the hardware's not in your house making noise and using power 24/7.

As for FANS. That's simple, look to build with 4-pin PWM fans that you can control the speed through the motherboard BIOS and software. You should have:
- a front fan (i.e. 12cm, 500RPM to 1500RPM)
- a rear/top fan (same specs)
- a CPU Heatsink/Fan (12cm fan if possible and a half-decent heatsink)

If you do this correctly, there should be very little noise.
December 9, 2012 4:34:35 AM

STREAMING:
You really need to limit the type of data being uploaded and downloaded. Avoid video completely as that will kill your speed.

There are T1 high-speed connections but I wouldn't start there. Try starting SMALL with an inexpensive server hosting game play but no video content. After you figure out what you're doing and if you intend to go larger you'll have the experience to do so.

Why not buy a $600 laptop and start there. It's not a perfect server but it might host quite a few people. Then when you figure out your RAM, Processing, Network bandwidth requirements you can BUILD something dedicated and then just keep the laptop to use as normal.

Plus the laptop would be very quiet and also has a battery in case of power interruptions (so your server doesn't crash).
December 9, 2012 4:41:05 AM

That would just be DayZ's requirements. As for more games I would recommend at least a hex core AMD processor. At school we run a game server with 2 hexcore AMD Opterons at 3.1ghz per core and 32gb of ram with a dedicated pipeline of 1gb up/1gb down

Quote:
What are the hardware requirements for a DayZ server?



Dedicated server hardware is now required to host a DayZ server. A home PC is not allowed. If you do not know if your hardware is a dedicated server, you don't have one.





CPU: Modern Quad Core @ 2.0Ghz+ (CPU is the main bottleneck for an ArmA server, so the more powerful the better)
RAM: 8GB (RAM isn't a big issue in an ArmA server, so don't be overly concerned with having copious amounts)
Storage: 50GB+ HDD - 500 IOPS minimum. SSD or 15k RPM SAS is recommended.
Network: 100Mbps+ dedicated. Bandwidth cap must be at least 2TB or more.
Slots: All servers must be running at 40+ slots, or 30+ in areas where bandwidth is expensive and where permitted. (Usually reserved for developing countries or remote regions)
Operating System: Windows 2003, 2008, 2008 R2
December 9, 2012 4:45:02 AM

So, if I were to forget DayZ altogether, and say I just want to run nothing but Minecraft and CS:GO, where do I stand? I could probably get a starting userbase of 10-20 from friends/other contacts, and hopefully a reasonable amount more from serverlisting and advertisements. Probably wouldn't expect a need for more than 16 slots on either server for awhile though.
December 9, 2012 4:47:32 AM

If you want to run Minecraft and CS:GO I recommend a quadcore with at least 3.4ghz or higher clock speeds since Minecraft only uses one core for servers so the faster the better. As for CS:GO dedicating that to the other cores would be the best solution and for ram you should look at about 8gb minimum 16gb recommended.

Minimums would be a quadcore at 2.4ghz with 8gb of ram and a 250gb hard drive since Minecraft depending on the mods you get can take up a large chunk of space for the maps
December 9, 2012 4:56:17 AM

Okay, so I'm probably in the right ballpark with the parts I've already picked out then.
December 9, 2012 5:06:37 AM

photonboy said:
STREAMING:
You really need to limit the type of data being uploaded and downloaded. Avoid video completely as that will kill your speed.

There are T1 high-speed connections but I wouldn't start there. Try starting SMALL with an inexpensive server hosting game play but no video content. After you figure out what you're doing and if you intend to go larger you'll have the experience to do so.

Why not buy a $600 laptop and start there. It's not a perfect server but it might host quite a few people. Then when you figure out your RAM, Processing, Network bandwidth requirements you can BUILD something dedicated and then just keep the laptop to use as normal.

Plus the laptop would be very quiet and also has a battery in case of power interruptions (so your server doesn't crash).

I meant that I would be streaming youtube videos on my own computer, not hosting a streaming service on the server.
December 9, 2012 5:34:36 AM

You can probably pull off one 16 person server. I've done a couple l4d2 servers and COD4 on my similar connection. But it only makes sense if you have parts lying around. I have an old dual xeon server that handles it just fine. It doesn't take much for games like those.

But servers are $1 a slot... I suppose if you use it for four years you might save a buck or two. doesn't make any sense to me. Never mind the electricity or any other issues
January 18, 2014 2:55:28 AM

LemonyLime said:
I'm starting up a gaming community, and want to buy a server to host a few dedicated game servers (minecraft, CS:GO, possibly DayZ and some others.) at home. I want to do this, because all of the cost is upfront, and in the long run will quickly become the cheaper alternative to paying monthly to rent several large game servers. Plus, if things fall through, and I end up closing the server, I still have a set of good new parts to put into my aging gaming PC. (Just updated the graphics, but everything else is overdue.) Because of that backup plan, I've decided to use standard PC parts, and not server parts. That said, I wonder if they'll be able to handle running 23.99/7 year round? I don't know much about PC hardware, and certainly not anything about server hardware, so I'm definitely looking for advice on what I should be looking at in that department. As far as operating system for the server, I've picked out Debian Linux without X, (so it's basically nothing but command prompt for you windows users) and have it installed on an old PC for testing. So far, everything working fine, and I have minecraft and CS:GO servers successfully running on that PC.

I've already planned out a setup on pcpartpicker, but I don't actually know what I'm doing, so I'm definitely looking for advice on this build. I originally had a budget of $500, and would like to pull it down to that, if possible (or even lower), but I want to still be sure that I will be able to host all of these servers on the same machine without any problems.
Here's that build: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rx6v

Other Notes:
-Will my home internet be fast enough for this, and how much of a drain will it put on my own internet usage? Should I consider buying a second internet line, or just upgrading mine? Here's a speedtest of my current internet: http://www.speedtest.net/result/2360312144.png

-From what I've heard, minecraft is hugely RAM dependent, but everything else doesn't really need much of it. Is the 32GB overkill?

-Pcpartpicker listed that case as a mid size tower, so I just picked it without actually looking at the dimensions, and as it turns out, it's actually ginormous. Even bigger than my full size gaming PC. I'm hoping I can find a smaller case, but I'm worried that the lack of space could cause issues with overheating and the like.

-Speaking of overheating, what should I worry about when it comes to taking care of the hardware? Is it safe to just sit it on a table in my room, or does it need more special treatment?

-I'll also probably use it as a storage server for my home network, unless you think that's a terrible idea.

-Computer fans are the absolute bane of my existence. My laptop's single mini-fan was so loud that I literally opened it up and taped the fan down so it couldn't move, and bought a lap fan to replace it. It was louder than my lawn mower, and replacing it twice didn't change anything. Point is, I don't really know how to tell without actually hearing it, but I want to make sure this isn't going to be really loud. lol


And I think that's about it. Let me know what you think of the build, and please don't hesitate to yell at me, if I'm doing anything stupid. lol


January 18, 2014 2:56:12 AM

Cheap Dedicated Server
April 15, 2014 1:53:54 PM

Hey, Trinity Games has a great Dedicated Server Hosting service. They can host just about anything you need to be hosted. They allow you to go into their TeamSpeak to talk and get the help you need if you are in need of anything. They allow you to control your box and pay for what you need. They have a amazing customer support that is always ready to help you out. They have a wide range of Payment plans and you can get what you need. Visit them at www.trinitygames.com
Hope you find what you are looking for.
April 24, 2014 1:17:08 PM

LemonyLime said:
I'm starting up a gaming community, and want to buy a server to host a few dedicated game servers (minecraft, CS:GO, possibly DayZ and some others.) at home. I want to do this, because all of the cost is upfront, and in the long run will quickly become the cheaper alternative to paying monthly to rent several large game servers. Plus, if things fall through, and I end up closing the server, I still have a set of good new parts to put into my aging gaming PC. (Just updated the graphics, but everything else is overdue.) Because of that backup plan, I've decided to use standard PC parts, and not server parts. That said, I wonder if they'll be able to handle running 23.99/7 year round? I don't know much about PC hardware, and certainly not anything about server hardware, so I'm definitely looking for advice on what I should be looking at in that department. As far as operating system for the server, I've picked out Debian Linux without X, (so it's basically nothing but command prompt for you windows users) and have it installed on an old PC for testing. So far, everything working fine, and I have minecraft and CS:GO servers successfully running on that PC.

I've already planned out a setup on pcpartpicker, but I don't actually know what I'm doing, so I'm definitely looking for advice on this build. I originally had a budget of $500, and would like to pull it down to that, if possible (or even lower), but I want to still be sure that I will be able to host all of these servers on the same machine without any problems.
Here's that build: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/rx6v

Other Notes:
-Will my home internet be fast enough for this, and how much of a drain will it put on my own internet usage? Should I consider buying a second internet line, or just upgrading mine? Here's a speedtest of my current internet: http://www.speedtest.net/result/2360312144.png

-From what I've heard, minecraft is hugely RAM dependent, but everything else doesn't really need much of it. Is the 32GB overkill?

-Pcpartpicker listed that case as a mid size tower, so I just picked it without actually looking at the dimensions, and as it turns out, it's actually ginormous. Even bigger than my full size gaming PC. I'm hoping I can find a smaller case, but I'm worried that the lack of space could cause issues with overheating and the like.

-Speaking of overheating, what should I worry about when it comes to taking care of the hardware? Is it safe to just sit it on a table in my room, or does it need more special treatment?

-I'll also probably use it as a storage server for my home network, unless you think that's a terrible idea.

-Computer fans are the absolute bane of my existence. My laptop's single mini-fan was so loud that I literally opened it up and taped the fan down so it couldn't move, and bought a lap fan to replace it. It was louder than my lawn mower, and replacing it twice didn't change anything. Point is, I don't really know how to tell without actually hearing it, but I want to make sure this isn't going to be really loud. lol


And I think that's about it. Let me know what you think of the build, and please don't hesitate to yell at me, if I'm doing anything stupid. lol


May 8, 2014 1:35:51 PM

Well, a suggestion if you want a good GAME SERVER computer I suggest that another computer(not an insane build)is used as a router for optimal connection performance NETWORK PROVIDER SPEED UPGRADE SUGGESTED. As for the build itself i suggest:
Intel SSD(new one)
2133 MHz RAM(16-24 GB)
Killer wireless card
This should be enough to help this post out a little
May 13, 2014 6:02:02 AM

Bluetangkid said:
Well, a suggestion if you want a good GAME SERVER computer I suggest that another computer(not an insane build)is used as a router for optimal connection performance NETWORK PROVIDER SPEED UPGRADE SUGGESTED. As for the build itself i suggest:
Intel SSD(new one)
2133 MHz RAM(16-24 GB)
Killer wireless card
This should be enough to help this post out a little


You should never run servers on a wireless connection.
I concur with BlueTangkid that a lot of ram and a SSD is crucial to server performance. I use 16gb of ram, and a Solid State and couldn't believe the performance increase I saw
June 20, 2014 9:53:23 PM

Man, do not loose your time to host server from your home PC. It's impossible in these days. May be 10 years ago was fine, but not now. Trust me! You wont survive 2 days. Now every kid can drop you down with basic DD0s attack and you will have a problems with your network operator because of that. And possible to be kicked off from their network. Also the other aspect is the cost of electricity. You must calculate everything before do something like this. I'm not talking about SQL injections or exploits on your own PC. Don't get me wrong man but this is really stupid to use your home pc for such thing. You must to have a lot of knowlidge to do that even then it will cost a lot and will be pointless.
The only one smart move is to buy some VPS with Ddos protection and unlimited speed. They cost about 30-40$ monthly. I'm using dedicated server but this operator OVH - http://www.ovh.co.uk/ can do the job. Good luck.
!