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Graphic card video editing

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 19, 2012 2:25:34 PM


Hardware:
Asus M4A89GTD_Pro_USB3
AMD Phenom X6 1075T
Corsair DDR3 16GB XMS3 (4x4GB)
Video card - on-board graphics 4290
PSU - 620W Neo Eco
ATI TV Card
Generic DVD Burner
LG Blu-Ray Burner
Samsung HD103SJ 1TB
Hitachi Deskstar 1TB
Hitachi Deskstar 2TB

I'm not a gamer and don't plan to play 3d games later, so no need to suggest high end card.
I'm considering upgrading some components but don't want to spend too much. I use this computer for all my needs. I like it quiet since I use it to play blu-ray and DVD. I edit HD video content and render home videos, which has been my most taxing on my system. I currently use on-board graphics 4290, which play the blu-ray without problems. I have read that the graphic card can assist Adobe Encore in rendering content. My question - will I see enough difference that it will be worth while? Will the noise increase so much to be disturbing watching video?
Considering HD6670
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...
October 19, 2012 2:38:38 PM

you're suppose to be choosing nvidia cards for rendering coz you need the cuda cores....
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a b U Graphics card
October 19, 2012 2:49:52 PM

Get a 7750. The new southern island GPU's are very good at computational work. It has a much better architecture and would be a significant improvement over the 6670.
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a b U Graphics card
October 19, 2012 3:49:35 PM





AMD FirePro V4900 bundled with Vegas Movie Studio Platinum 12 - OEM: $205

Otherwise, you need to determine which version of Encore you are using, and what specific GPU acceleration function in that version might be available to you.

That suite of Vegas will render to DVD Architect. From there you may build your disc menus. There is serious support for GPU-accelerated AVC rendering in addition to GPU acceleration for editing, video FX, transitions, compositing, pan/crop, track motion, preview and encoding.

Do not depend upon anything less than CS5 Encore to provide much GPU acceleration in any specific function you may need in your workflow.

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a b U Graphics card
October 19, 2012 4:02:03 PM

Wow, thats a good deal for a pro card. That is what I would go with. I use a v5900 and its great, although Nvidia cards seem to be compatible with more software rendering. If you do decide to go the Nvidia route, go with a 4 or 5 series card with a 460gtx being the lowest I would go.
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a b U Graphics card
October 19, 2012 4:35:55 PM


Benchmarking Vegas Using GPU on FirePro V4900 ... vs Quadro

Quote:
...take advantage of GPU acceleration for video FX, transitions, compositing, pan/crop, track motion and encoding. The series of test discussed below used an AMD FX 8150 8-core processor, 3.6 GHz, 8GB RAM, running Microsoft Windows 7 64-bit.

The benchmarks evaluated preview and rendering with OpenCL GPU acceleration enabled on the AMD FirePro v4900, V5900 and V7900 and compared to the comparably priced NVIDIA Quadro 600, 2000 and 4000.





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October 19, 2012 7:55:09 PM

Thanks everyone. For more information, I'm using Adobe creative suite CS5. Premiere apparently does just Cuda for GPU acceleration but I use Encore and Photoshop more.
http://www.adobe.com/products/premiere/tech-specs.html
I found this article review of GPU performance and Adobe products.
http://www.cgchannel.com/2011/03/review-gpu-acceleratio...
Here's a quote
my tests suggest that the Adobe CS5 applications run equally happily on less expensive consumer cards. The only exception is Premiere Pro; and even then, only if you are working with large projects.

With Photoshop, I feel that it is safe to say that any recent Nvidia or ATI card with at least 1GB of RAM is more than enough computing horsepower for all of the GPU-accelerated features, even with the very largest images.

With After Effects, if you are using the OpenGL preview renderer, any recent Nvidia or ATI card with 1-2GB of RAM should suffice, unless you are working with long compositions at resolutions of 2K or higher.

Adobe suite can use the OpenGL from any of the newer cards
http://helpx.adobe.com/photoshop/kb/tested-video-cards-...

I was originally thinking under $100 and I would like it to be as quiet if possible, since I play the videos too. This is for my home computer doing home videos.

My question - will I see enough difference that it will be worth while? Will the noise increase so much to be disturbing watching video?
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a b U Graphics card
October 19, 2012 9:55:48 PM

Get a 7750. Noise won't increase much at all.
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!