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Bandwith of specific types of video cables?

Last response: in Graphics & Displays
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October 21, 2012 7:52:25 AM

I'm going to buy some cables and redundant converters to the point where I can run almost all of my audio and video through few S-video cables. Would there be and problems with bandwith, quality degration, or anything else? I was thinking of buying a 2 video cable and then some female pins and soldering each wire to whatever purpose that suits me.
Something like:
-Audio
3.5mm RCA > Component> S-video (longest cord) >component > 3.5mm RCA
-Video
HDMI > VGA > S-video (longest) > Vga > Hdmi

Would I lose any features that may some with the cables by ludicrous amounts of conversions?
sidenote: Also when splitting is there any way to keep a signal on one direction? I like to hook up a component relay of audio computer(rca> component), xbox for game audio, and the last component goes to my tritton headset. Normally My xbox is off and whenever I'm not play I have to unplug the xbox because it acts as a ground and dampens the signal heavily.

Sidenote 2: (sorry for the jumpbling) On my trittons I want to split the male imput to both my controller (so friends can hear me) and my computer (for recording on computer) and also split the 3.5mm RCA out on the back of my computer to the component for my trittons ans speakers. Unfortunately if I do either one of the devices on either end will either have extremely low quality, or the other will have a persistent buzzing noise, and if I flip the connection the other gets the buzzing/degraded quality. Is there any way to make a 1 way connection or get rid of buzzing?
a c 116 U Graphics card
October 21, 2012 8:01:35 AM

1zacster said:
I'm going to buy some cables and redundant converters to the point where I can run almost all of my audio and video through few S-video cables. Would there be and problems with bandwith, quality degration, or anything else? I was thinking of buying a 2 video cable and then some female pins and soldering each wire to whatever purpose that suits me.
Something like:
-Audio
3.5mm RCA > Component> S-video (longest cord) >component > 3.5mm RCA
-Video
HDMI > VGA > S-video (longest) > Vga > Hdmi

Would I lose any features that may some with the cables by ludicrous amounts of conversions?
sidenote: Also when splitting is there any way to keep a signal on one direction? I like to hook up a component relay of audio computer(rca> component), xbox for game audio, and the last component goes to my tritton headset. Normally My xbox is off and whenever I'm not play I have to unplug the xbox because it acts as a ground and dampens the signal heavily.

Sidenote 2: (sorry for the jumpbling) On my trittons I want to split the male imput to both my controller (so friends can hear me) and my computer (for recording on computer) and also split the 3.5mm RCA out on the back of my computer to the component for my trittons ans speakers. Unfortunately if I do either one of the devices on either end will either have extremely low quality, or the other will have a persistent buzzing noise, and if I flip the connection the other gets the buzzing/degraded quality. Is there any way to make a 1 way connection or get rid of buzzing?


There are so many problems with this that I don't even know where to begin.

Most of those formats are not even compatible. You cannot convert HDMI to VGA without an active converter, much less to S-Video and back. Similarly, Component and S-Video are not designed for audio.

You can get long HDMI cables (50+ feet) which will carry 1080p. If you are not working with resolutions over 1080p use HDMI and only HDMI. You can also get HDMI switches (arbitrating one output from 2+ sources) for cheap.
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October 21, 2012 9:15:58 AM

Pinhedd said:
There are so many problems with this that I don't even know where to begin.

Most of those formats are not even compatible. You cannot convert HDMI to VGA without an active converter, much less to S-Video and back. Similarly, Component and S-Video are not designed for audio.

You can get long HDMI cables (50+ feet) which will carry 1080p. If you are not working with resolutions over 1080p use HDMI and only HDMI. You can also get HDMI switches (arbitrating one output from 2+ sources) for cheap.


Well vga was a bad example choice. But what about rca cables? How long does it generally take before signal degrades? Also thats why I said the soldering, I might not necessarily have to convert but rather just use it as a "placeholder" (for lack of a better word) to just make it compact and the fact that it can save space
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a c 116 U Graphics card
October 21, 2012 3:43:11 PM

1zacster said:
Well vga was a bad example choice. But what about rca cables? How long does it generally take before signal degrades? Also thats why I said the soldering, I might not necessarily have to convert but rather just use it as a "placeholder" (for lack of a better word) to just make it compact and the fact that it can save space


You'll run into the same problem with RCA.

Signal degradation is only one problem that you may run into. If the signal reflects too much due to non-matched impedance and soldering (which is extremely likely to happen) then it won't work at all.
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a b U Graphics card
October 21, 2012 3:54:19 PM

For really long cable runs, use Cat 5e or 6 cable with convertors. You can get pretty long HDMI cables too, like 100 feet.
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