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Flash reccommendations for Maxxum 7D

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Anonymous
May 8, 2005 6:08:30 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Just wondering if anybody had any opinions on or recommendations for flashes
for the Maxxum 7D. I'm looking for something that will eliminate red eye and
the red eye reduction preflash as well as just be an all around better
flash than the one on the camera. Flash is one of my weaknesses. I don't
fully understand guide number and the finer points of TTL flash metering and
such.

Any input greatly appreciated.

TIA.

mike
Anonymous
May 8, 2005 6:30:38 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

mike regish wrote:

> Just wondering if anybody had any opinions on or recommendations for flashes
> for the Maxxum 7D. I'm looking for something that will eliminate red eye and
> the red eye reduction preflash as well as just be an all around better
> flash than the one on the camera. Flash is one of my weaknesses. I don't
> fully understand guide number and the finer points of TTL flash metering and
> such.
>
> Any input greatly appreciated.

Maxxum 5600HS. Powerful, compatible. Get a couple sets of NiMH's and
you are all set.

Redeye reduction is best accomplished by getting the flash head away
from the axis of the lens.

1) Point the flash head at a white ceiling or wall. No red eye at all.

2) Get the flash off camera. With the 7D and 5600, drive the 5600HS
wirelessly or with a cable. Use a stroboframe bracket to help in this
regard.

I hate redeye reduction lights. Whether a pre flash or constant light,
these ruin the sponteneity of shots.

Guide number indicates how much aperture is available to you at full
flash power. The GN of the 5600HS is 56 meters at ISO 100 for an 85mm
lens. At wider lens angles, the GN is less (as the head zooms to spread
the light wider).

Divide the GN by the aperture number to get the max distance at that
aperture.

GN of 56 means, for example, that at ISO 100 you can shoot f/5.6 to a
distance of 10 meters. Or, at f/11 ( 56 / 11 ) = 5 meters. (But, keep
in mind that as the FL gets smaller, the GN goes down as the light is
spread out more. OTOH, you can shoot at ISO 400 and double the GN).

TTL flash metering on digital cameras basically means that the flash
will shoot a weak pre-flash and the TTL metering will calculate how much
power is needed for the shot at the chose aperture for the returned
reflectivity. That power will be expended when the shutter opens.

A problem with this, like all TTL metering, is that subject reflectivity
comes into play. So whites go grey and darks get over exposed. You
have to evaluate this and use the flash compensation to correct.

It's worse than that as objects that are closer reflect more light back
than objects that are further away. So depending where your meter is
weighted and the reflectivity of objects, results are less consistent
than you will like.

The savior is the chimp-o-meter. (Use the histogram to help set the
flash comp and then re-shoot). Personally I tend to favour manual flash
power settings over TTL, esp. with the DSLR as I get the feedback right
away. But if its a one off shot, I evaluate the scene and flash comp
for it.

Cheers,
Alan

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