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Focus area on D70

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Anonymous
May 12, 2005 8:54:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

I have been using a Nikon 801s for many years and am used to having the
focus on the centre of the frame, by default. It took me a while to
realise that with the D70 when you set to centre focus, it doesn't
always stay, but moves back to the default of centering on the closest
subject. I find this extremely annoying and wondered if I have just
missed something and there is a way to change this default setting.

Thanks for any help anyone can provide with this one, as I keep
forgetting to look before I shoot!

Jenny

More about : focus area d70

Anonymous
May 12, 2005 11:54:03 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"BuzzyBee" <jenny@dezignit.com> wrote in news:1115942087.921860.288450
@g14g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

> I have been using a Nikon 801s for many years and am used to having the
> focus on the centre of the frame, by default. It took me a while to
> realise that with the D70 when you set to centre focus, it doesn't
> always stay, but moves back to the default of centering on the closest
> subject. I find this extremely annoying and wondered if I have just
> missed something and there is a way to change this default setting.

This I don't understand - if under the CSM menu (the pencil) item 03 AF-
area mode is set to Single Area (or even Dynamic Area for stuff that's
not moving), then the D70 should never adjust your focus choice. It's
whatever focus area is dark, and you can adjust that with the little
cross-pad to the right of the LCD, but it should never jump by itself to
another area. I don't think I've ever seen it do that in practice either
and it would certainly be very noticable to have the wrong thing in focus
all the time.

I've just verified this by focusing on a scene with things at various
levels of distance and it always focuses wherever my focusing cursor is
and never jumps to another focus area. Are you sure your 03 AF-area mode
setting isn't set to Closest Subjct?
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 12:20:04 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 12 May 2005 16:54:47 -0700, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems "BuzzyBee"
<jenny@dezignit.com> wrote:

>I have been using a Nikon 801s for many years and am used to having the
>focus on the centre of the frame, by default. It took me a while to
>realise that with the D70 when you set to centre focus, it doesn't
>always stay, but moves back to the default of centering on the closest
>subject. I find this extremely annoying and wondered if I have just
>missed something and there is a way to change this default setting.
>
>Thanks for any help anyone can provide with this one, as I keep
>forgetting to look before I shoot!

What AF Area Mode are you setting? This shouldn't happen if set to Single
area under Custom Setting 3.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
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May 13, 2005 4:13:46 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

BuzzyBee wrote:
> I have been using a Nikon 801s for many years and am used to having the
> focus on the centre of the frame, by default. It took me a while to
> realise that with the D70 when you set to centre focus, it doesn't
> always stay, but moves back to the default of centering on the closest
> subject. I find this extremely annoying and wondered if I have just
> missed something and there is a way to change this default setting.
>
> Thanks for any help anyone can provide with this one, as I keep
> forgetting to look before I shoot!
>
> Jenny
>
Set the default mode via the CSM menu item 3. Default is _not_ closest
subject. Reset your menus if you don't believe me.
Closest subject is probably the default mode of some of the point &
shoot auto modes. As an ex-slr user, you probably don't want to use
those anyway. The focus mode resets to what you have set as default
when you switch back to S,A, or M.
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 4:13:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Frederick wrote:
>
> Closest subject is probably the default mode of some of the point &
> shoot auto modes.


I believe it is.


--
Paul Furman
http://www.edgehill.net/1
san francisco native plants
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 4:13:47 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <1115943177.497830@ftpsrv1>,
Frederick <nomailplease@nomail.com> wrote:
>BuzzyBee wrote:
>> I have been using a Nikon 801s for many years and am used to having the
>> focus on the centre of the frame, by default. It took me a while to
>> realise that with the D70 when you set to centre focus, it doesn't
>> always stay, but moves back to the default of centering on the closest
>> subject. I find this extremely annoying and wondered if I have just
>> missed something and there is a way to change this default setting.

[ ... ]

>Set the default mode via the CSM menu item 3. Default is _not_ closest
>subject. Reset your menus if you don't believe me.
>Closest subject is probably the default mode of some of the point &
>shoot auto modes. As an ex-slr user, you probably don't want to use
>those anyway. The focus mode resets to what you have set as default
>when you switch back to S,A, or M.

Also with the 'P' setting.

However, another thing to watch out for is that the
thumb-operated selector (tilts different ways to do different things)
can be used to move the focus area around, unless you are in a mode
which is using it for something else, such as selecting an image, or
a menu entry, or scrolling around in an image on the display.

To *prevent* that, there is a slide switch just below the
selector which can be moved to a '.' or a 'L'. In the L position, an
accidental touch on the selector will not move the focus ares. With it
set to '.', you can move the focus area to where you want it (once you
get comfortable with focusing in other areas).

I know that the "A" setting on the knob to the left of the
pentaprism will always go to "closest subject" mode, which is very often
something which I do not desire. It will also pop up the flash when you
are trying to take unobtrusive available-light photos, so I almost never
use the 'A' setting. P, S, A, or M are much better. (And with 'P' you
can have the auto exposure, but can adjust either the shutter speed or
the aperture to what you want, and have the other track as needed.

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 13, 2005 4:13:48 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 12 May 2005 21:54:19 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:


> I know that the "A" setting on the knob to the left of the
>pentaprism will always go to "closest subject" mode, which is very often
>something which I do not desire. It will also pop up the flash when you
>are trying to take unobtrusive available-light photos, so I almost never
>use the 'A' setting. P, S, A, or M are much better. (And with 'P' you
>can have the auto exposure, but can adjust either the shutter speed or
>the aperture to what you want, and have the other track as needed.

You are describing the green Auto setting, not A for Aperture priority mode
you allude to later.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 12:21:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <r3r881d88uf7hlorurek8s4jgv45da4i2s@4ax.com>,
Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>On 12 May 2005 21:54:19 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
>dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:
>
>
>> I know that the "A" setting on the knob to the left of the
>>pentaprism will always go to "closest subject" mode, which is very often
>>something which I do not desire. It will also pop up the flash when you
>>are trying to take unobtrusive available-light photos, so I almost never
>>use the 'A' setting. P, S, A, or M are much better. (And with 'P' you
>>can have the auto exposure, but can adjust either the shutter speed or
>>the aperture to what you want, and have the other track as needed.
>
>You are describing the green Auto setting, not A for Aperture priority mode
>you allude to later.

Correct. Sorry for not making that clear. Two 'A' settings
only distinguished by color. Something more to complain about. :-)

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 10:15:47 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 13 May 2005 20:21:51 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

>Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>>On 12 May 2005 21:54:19 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems

>>You are describing the green Auto setting, not A for Aperture priority mode
>>you allude to later.
>
> Correct. Sorry for not making that clear. Two 'A' settings
>only distinguished by color. Something more to complain about. :-)

Actually, not on my D70. The Auto function is denoted by the word AUTO in
caps above a camera icon both in green. Quite easy to distinguish from the
white A for Aperture priority mode. Though imo, using red to warn folks off
it's use would have been a better choice of color.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 9:03:27 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <mmjb811917cp0274hm06avn58bu0pbjfp1@4ax.com>,
Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>On 13 May 2005 20:21:51 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
>dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:
>
>>Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>>>On 12 May 2005 21:54:19 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
>
>>>You are describing the green Auto setting, not A for Aperture priority mode
>>>you allude to later.
>>
>> Correct. Sorry for not making that clear. Two 'A' settings
>>only distinguished by color. Something more to complain about. :-)
>
>Actually, not on my D70. The Auto function is denoted by the word AUTO in
>caps above a camera icon both in green.

Same as mine. I should have actually reached out and picked up
the camera and examined it before posting, instead of going by memory.

> Quite easy to distinguish from the
>white A for Aperture priority mode. Though imo, using red to warn folks off
>it's use would have been a better choice of color.

Agreed -- but for the target audience, they want to mark it as
the "safe" mode, where the camera does *everything* for you, except
point it and push the shutter release. :-)

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 14, 2005 11:05:33 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 14 May 2005 17:03:27 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

>In article <mmjb811917cp0274hm06avn58bu0pbjfp1@4ax.com>,
>Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:

>>Quite easy to distinguish from the
>>white A for Aperture priority mode. Though imo, using red to warn folks off
>>it's use would have been a better choice of color.
>
> Agreed -- but for the target audience, they want to mark it as
>the "safe" mode, where the camera does *everything* for you, except
>point it and push the shutter release. :-)

Except, ther are all the caveats associated with it. All the in camera
processing done dependent upon the image content, so a newbie can't see how
various settings make a difference.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 3:38:51 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

In article <qs0d81tdm68j3jv3ap2fao42ou8replaht@4ax.com>,
Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>On 14 May 2005 17:03:27 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
>dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:
>
>>In article <mmjb811917cp0274hm06avn58bu0pbjfp1@4ax.com>,
>>Ed Ruf <egruf_usenet@cox.net> wrote:
>
>>>Quite easy to distinguish from the
>>>white A for Aperture priority mode. Though imo, using red to warn folks off
>>>it's use would have been a better choice of color.
>>
>> Agreed -- but for the target audience, they want to mark it as
>>the "safe" mode, where the camera does *everything* for you, except
>>point it and push the shutter release. :-)
>
>Except, ther are all the caveats associated with it. All the in camera
>processing done dependent upon the image content, so a newbie can't see how
>various settings make a difference.

Agreed. It is the setting for someone who wants point-and-shoot
behavior out of a DSLR. If I hand my D70 to my wife, I want to minimize
things that she has to consider, so it will go in "Auto" mode, unless
something really calls for control, at which point I will probably try
to preset as much as possible for her. This leaves her needing to aim,
select an appropriate zoom (if so fitted), and shoot. If she needs
flash, the flash will pop up and turn itself on.

She is good with computers, and is sitting at her Unix machine
at the moment. But she has never owned a camera with the kind of
controls available here -- just (originally) Brownie style cameras, and
more recently, a CoolPix 950 which she is quite comfortable with.

I've used cameras with a reasonable set of adjustments since
about 1955, when I got a Ziess Ikon Ikonta 520 folding camera (16
2-1/4x1-7/8" exposures on 620 or 120 roll film) and started doing my own
processing.

I've had lots of cameras since then, with the first
interchangeable lens SLR being a Miranda F (I couldnt' afford a Nikon F
at the time. :-)

So -- for *me*, the Auto setting is unlikely to be used. 'P' is
the most common, since I can tune aperture or shutter speed at need
there, or 'M', when using one of the pre-CPU lenses from my collection.

But -- for someone who wants to pick up the camera for the first
time, and get at least reasonable shots, the Auto mode does serve a
function. Nikon put it there for those first-time buyers, to minimize
the "my camera is broken" complaints, I think.

Once someone wants more control, s/he can turn off Auto, and
start learning what controls are available, what they do, and how they
interact.

One of the first things which I would turn off is the "Closest
Subject Focus", which started this discussion, as I am likely to have
things which I *want* out of focus in the foreground. :-)

Enjoy,
DoN.
--
Email: <dnichols@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
(too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
--- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
Anonymous
May 15, 2005 11:28:53 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 14 May 2005 23:38:51 -0400, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems
dnichols@d-and-d.com (DoN. Nichols) wrote:

> Agreed. It is the setting for someone who wants point-and-shoot
>behavior out of a DSLR. If I hand my D70 to my wife, I want to minimize
>things that she has to consider, so it will go in "Auto" mode, unless
>something really calls for control, at which point I will probably try
>to preset as much as possible for her. This leaves her needing to aim,
>select an appropriate zoom (if so fitted), and shoot. If she needs
>flash, the flash will pop up and turn itself on.
>
> She is good with computers, and is sitting at her Unix machine
>at the moment. But she has never owned a camera with the kind of
>controls available here -- just (originally) Brownie style cameras, and
>more recently, a CoolPix 950 which she is quite comfortable with.
>
> I've used cameras with a reasonable set of adjustments since
>about 1955, when I got a Ziess Ikon Ikonta 520 folding camera (16
>2-1/4x1-7/8" exposures on 620 or 120 roll film) and started doing my own
>processing.
>
> I've had lots of cameras since then, with the first
>interchangeable lens SLR being a Miranda F (I couldnt' afford a Nikon F
>at the time. :-)
>
> So -- for *me*, the Auto setting is unlikely to be used. 'P' is
>the most common, since I can tune aperture or shutter speed at need
>there, or 'M', when using one of the pre-CPU lenses from my collection.
>
> But -- for someone who wants to pick up the camera for the first
>time, and get at least reasonable shots, the Auto mode does serve a
>function. Nikon put it there for those first-time buyers, to minimize
>the "my camera is broken" complaints, I think.
>
> Once someone wants more control, s/he can turn off Auto, and
>start learning what controls are available, what they do, and how they
>interact.
>
> One of the first things which I would turn off is the "Closest
>Subject Focus", which started this discussion, as I am likely to have
>things which I *want* out of focus in the foreground. :-)

I come from a CP-900 and 5700, as well. To be honest I never understood the
"fully automatic mode" in these at the time top of the line P&S cameras.
As you have said, you can get near the same fully auto everything from
Program mode, except the flash on the D70. But, if you want you can also
have control over every other setting in the camera, including the AF area
setting,

It seems there are a lot of questions in these forums from folks confused
over exactly what setting are being set in the fully auto or scene modes
which would not be here if they just took a small amount of time to
familiarize themselves with the camera and manual the first few days they
own it. The default continuous AF of the P&S Nikon's is a blaring example.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
Anonymous
May 16, 2005 10:12:40 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

Thank you for everyone's replies, sorry I have been away and haven't
been able to reply sooner.

The problem I have is when I shoot in fully AUTO, for quick snapshots,
the default always seems to be Closest Subject, when I change it to
Centre focus and then use another mode on the camera, such as Shutter
or Aperture Priority, then when I go back to AUTO it has defaulted back
to Closest Subject again. I would have expected the default to be
CENTRE focus, or at least remembered my last setting.

Jenny
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 9:48:25 AM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

On 16 May 2005 18:12:40 -0700, in rec.photo.digital.slr-systems "BuzzyBee"
<jenny@dezignit.com> wrote:

>Thank you for everyone's replies, sorry I have been away and haven't
>been able to reply sooner.
>
>The problem I have is when I shoot in fully AUTO, for quick snapshots,
>the default always seems to be Closest Subject, when I change it to
>Centre focus and then use another mode on the camera, such as Shutter
>or Aperture Priority, then when I go back to AUTO it has defaulted back
>to Closest Subject again. I would have expected the default to be
>CENTRE focus, or at least remembered my last setting.

Forget auto mode completely. Just use Program mode. You can't change any of
the settings in Auto mode including which AF are setting is being used.
----------
Ed Ruf Lifetime AMA# 344007 (Usenet@EdwardG.Ruf.com)
See images taken with my CP-990/5700 & D70 at
http://edwardgruf.com/Digital_Photography/General/index...
May 17, 2005 8:32:20 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

BuzzyBee wrote:
> Thank you for everyone's replies, sorry I have been away and haven't
> been able to reply sooner.
>
> The problem I have is when I shoot in fully AUTO, for quick snapshots,
> the default always seems to be Closest Subject, when I change it to
> Centre focus and then use another mode on the camera, such as Shutter
> or Aperture Priority, then when I go back to AUTO it has defaulted back
> to Closest Subject again. I would have expected the default to be
> CENTRE focus, or at least remembered my last setting.
>
> Jenny
>
It isn't "defaulting" - the auto mode is an auto mode. God knows what
else it changes - I never use it.
Try using A, S, M, or P modes. They are the ones where your default
settings will work. Failing that use any of the custom program modes.
Use Auto mode as a last resort only.
Anonymous
May 17, 2005 11:52:02 PM

Archived from groups: rec.photo.digital.slr-systems (More info?)

"BuzzyBee" <jenny@dezignit.com> wrote in news:1116292360.792999.150420
@g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
> The problem I have is when I shoot in fully AUTO, for quick snapshots,
> the default always seems to be Closest Subject, when I change it to
> Centre focus and then use another mode on the camera, such as Shutter

Ah yes, okay. Auto is auto. You're supposed to let the camera make all the
decisions and not worry. Which of course means you run smack into the
limitations. And I don't think you can get it to remember changes.

I would use the 'P' mode instead - set things as you like them and it will
remember them while still taking care of the auto white balance, light
metering and all that. It's 'auto with override' mode - so as a bonus you
can still use the dial to override the speed/aperture setting or change the
ev settings if you like but you are by no means obligated to.
!