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(New Build) Gaming rig for $800

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  • Battlefield
  • Gaming
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December 16, 2012 2:38:12 PM

I want a custom gaming rig for around 750 - 800. If you include a OS then 900

I want to be able to play games from minecraft to BF3 to skyrim.

I don't need crazy fps like 70 for BF3. But at least good enough that I can get 40 - 50 on high settings for battlefield 3.

Im a complete newbie when it comes to custom building pc's.

I don't need a mice or keyboard. Im also fine when it comes to the monitor.

Im in the us

More about : build gaming rig 800

a b 4 Gaming
December 16, 2012 4:28:46 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.99 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock B75M-DGS Micro ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($61.97 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($31.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.98 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX ProSeries 450W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($42.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On IHAS324-98 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $751.87
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-16 13:20 EST-0500)

you can also reuse optical drive from your old computer to save that $14 or you can just burn the win7 on to a USB

also leaves you room to upgrade some parts here and there.
the ones that i do recommend upgrading
1)SSD - may be a painfully expensive upgrade but i do say that it makes your system a lot more responsive.
would pick up this
http://pcpartpicker.com/part/samsung-internal-hard-driv...

2)Case- this one is somewhat important the 200R is pretty well rounded for its price but i would invest on getting a 400R or 500R for better airflow and better cable management

3)CPU - doesnt really need to be upgraded since it might make your price jump a lot because you will need to spend about $30 on an aftermarket heatsink for overclocking

4)PSU - the PSU i picked out is fine but it is not modular so it is an option to upgrade that too. Also at the 450W mark, you won't really have that much cables anyways so i think you are good here
December 16, 2012 4:39:00 PM

About that PSU... the wattage is too low to be comfortable with. Stick to a good 650+ if youre making a gaming build.
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a b 4 Gaming
December 16, 2012 5:48:13 PM

PoplicoMan said:
About that PSU... the wattage is too low to be comfortable with. Stick to a good 650+ if youre making a gaming build.


not needed

he is not OCing CPU and if he does OC GPU it will be good enough. The GPU says minimum of 500W but its actually not true as it doesnt pull a lot of power even though it pulls the most out of the system. so 650W is out of the question(unless you have 7970 GHz). Besides that, even though it says 450W it doesnt pull out a maximum of 450W it actually pulls out around 500-550W+ if needed
a b 4 Gaming
December 16, 2012 6:00:29 PM

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($149.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($31.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.49 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On IHAS324-98 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $738.96
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-16 14:55 EST-0500)

It's similar to boulbox's build. I just picked out a better motherboard and bumped up the PSU a bit. If you want to spend a little more for more performance, I recommend this...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro3 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Source 210 Elite (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.49 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.89 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $790.28
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-16 15:04 EST-0500)
a b 4 Gaming
December 16, 2012 6:44:13 PM

DeusAres said:
PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3470 3.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($149.99 @ Microcenter)
Motherboard: ASRock H77 Pro4/MVP ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($87.55 @ Newegg)
Memory: Patriot Intel Extreme Master, Limited Ed 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($31.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.49 @ SuperBiiz)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On IHAS324-98 DVD/CD Writer ($14.99 @ Newegg)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $738.96
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-16 14:55 EST-0500)

It's similar to boulbox's build. I just picked out a better motherboard and bumped up the PSU a bit. If you want to spend a little more for more performance, I recommend this...

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant / Benchmarks

CPU: Intel Core i5-3570K 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.99 @ Microcenter)
CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($29.98 @ Amazon)
Motherboard: ASRock Z77 Pro3 ATX LGA1155 Motherboard ($89.99 @ Amazon)
Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($39.99 @ Newegg)
Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ NCIX US)
Video Card: Sapphire Radeon HD 7870 GHz Edition 2GB Video Card ($194.99 @ Newegg)
Case: NZXT Source 210 Elite (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($37.49 @ Newegg)
Power Supply: XFX 550W 80 PLUS Bronze Certified ATX12V / EPS12V Power Supply ($49.99 @ NCIX US)
Optical Drive: Lite-On iHAS124-04 DVD/CD Writer ($17.89 @ Outlet PC)
Operating System: Microsoft Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 (OEM) (64-bit) ($89.98 @ Outlet PC)
Total: $790.28
(Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available.)
(Generated by PCPartPicker 2012-12-16 15:04 EST-0500)



nice, i would definitely go with the first one and add an SSD since he said the budget can go up to 900 because of the OS
December 16, 2012 10:02:00 PM

boulbox said:
not needed

he is not OCing CPU and if he does OC GPU it will be good enough. The GPU says minimum of 500W but its actually not true as it doesnt pull a lot of power even though it pulls the most out of the system. so 650W is out of the question(unless you have 7970 GHz). Besides that, even though it says 450W it doesnt pull out a maximum of 450W it actually pulls out around 500-550W+ if needed

I understand that its ok right now, but low watt PSU's dont provide any upgradability. Dish out some extra money now and avoid a full replacement
a b 4 Gaming
December 16, 2012 11:58:12 PM

PoplicoMan said:
I understand that its ok right now, but low watt PSU's dont provide any upgradability. Dish out some extra money now and avoid a full replacement


full replacement for what? if he upgrades it has to be at least next generation or the one after that and by then i would actually be using less power as what has been going on for the current generations of GPUs. you rarely see a generation that uses 500W for 1 GPU then the next generation jumping up to 600W especially now when the chips are getting smaller and smaller for power efficiency.
!